Category Archives: Get Ready To Move

Potted plants

Moving your Plants to your new Home

If you garden at all-anything from a small succulent in your kitchen window to a full-blown vegetable garden in your backyard you put a lot of time, effort, and care into growing your plants. Because of the hard work you’ve put into them, it may be difficult to leave your plants behind.

Movers typically don’t transport plants because of state regulations and extreme temperature and lack of sunlight in the truck can be fatal. Double check with your local Bekins agents before you pack your plants. After you make sure the place you’re moving to has the right climate and soil for your plants, you can easily pack them up and move them yourself.

Here are a few different common plants and how to best move them.

Perennials/Grasses

First, trim down bigger, sturdier plants to about 6-12 inches. This makes them easier to

gardenguides.com

gardenguides.com

move, it encourages regrowth when you replant them, and it’s actually healthier for the plant. If you leave lots of stems, leaves, or flowers, it can stress out the plant because it’s trying to keep so much more of itself alive.

After trimming down the plants, dig them up-making sure to keep a lot of dirt around the roots-and put them in paper bags.

Make sure you’re using paper bags instead of plastic so the plants can still breathe. If you have to use plastic, poke some holes in it. The plants should be fine for a couple of weeks as long as they don’t get too hot or dry. Just make sure they’re in the shade during the move.

Potted Plants

The first thing to do is to make sure that you’re not moving your potted plants in nice ceramic pots-you don’t want those to break on the road. Move the plants to plastic pots a couple weeks before the move to give them a chance to get used to the new pots. Potted PlantA couple days before the move, water the plants; not too much, not too little. You don’t want them drying out, but you also don’t want them molding.

Next, put the plants in boxes and make sure they’re snug. You can stuff paper or bubble wrap around the pots to make sure they don’t get jostled around. If possible, keep the top of the boxes open to ensure they don’t get crushed by something else.

Also, don’t forget: plenty of your outdoor plants can move to pots. Things like herbs are commonly grown in pots. As long as you give them enough time to readjust to the pots before the move, they should be perfectly fine to travel.

Vegetables

You have two options here, and your choice depends on your space and resources. Your first option is to dig up the entire plant and replant it in a large bucket, such as a five gallon bucket used for food storage. These buckets should sit in your personal vehicle.

Tomato plantThe second option is to cut the plant and put the cutting in a floral tube, making sure it stays moist by covering it with wet paper towels. If you don’t have a floral tube, you can use a potato soaked in water. This method is easier and safer than trying to relocate an entire tomato plant.

When you get to your new home, replant the plants right away. The less time they spend in limbo, the better. Keep in mind that your perennials and vegetables might not look quite as large and beautiful as they did before the move, at least for a while. If they stayed dormant during the move, they can put their energy into root growth once they’re replanted.

If you use these tips to move your plants, next year they should be big and beautiful again-you just have to give them time to recover.

Baby Relocating

Moving with your Infant: 7 Ways to make it Safe & Easy

Have an infant but need to relocate?

Don’t worry. You can achieve a safe and easy move even with your small child in tow. From advanced planning to packing and basic moving tips, the following guide covers everything you need to complete your move with a happy, healthy, and cared-for baby.

Before the Move

Advanced planning is an absolute must when you have an infant. In addition to your regular moving to-dos, add these items to your list:

  1. Create a Meal Plan

Packing boxes and organizing transportation is no easy feat. You might struggle to find time to feed your baby, let alone time to feed yourself. So before your move, take the time to plan a few simple meals to keep up your energy levels. Stick with simple foods you can take on the go, like sandwiches and trail mix.

  1. Book a Babysitter

You and your significant other can take turns packing and watching the baby, but you’ll Moving with a baby 2definitely need help on moving day. You don’t want to worry about your child crawling under foot or crying unnoticed in the corner as you load boxes into the truck.

So hire a professional service, or ask a friend or family member help. Make sure your sitter knows the right date and time, and give plenty of advanced notice. If you worry your go-to sitter might not be available, ask a back-up babysitter to help, just in case.

  1. Find a Pediatrician

Your baby could get sick before, en route, or once you’ve arrived at your new place. To avoid a stressful situation, find a good pediatrician before your move. Ask around, read reviews, and visit your child’s new doctor.

Also, keep copies of your child’s medical records on hand, or mail them in advance to the pediatrician. This way you can keep your child up-to-date on his or her immunizations despite the move.

During the Move

Now that you’ve planned your entire move, it’s time to prepare you and your baby for the official moving day.

  1. Put Together aMoving In Travel Case of Baby Essentials

Think everything you use to care for your baby day and a night. Since moving services may deliver your items before or after you arrive, you’ll want to keep certain essentials with you. This could include:

  • Diapers and wipes
  • Diaper rash ointment
  • Changing pad
  • Changes of clothes
  • Toys and snacks
  • Plenty of baby food
  • First-aid kit
  • Plastic bags for trash
  • Stroller
  • Portable crib
  • One or two blankets
  • Sunscreen

Although packing these items can sometimes seem look more hassle than its worth, you’ll be happy you have them during an emergency.

  1. Take Extra Time En Route

If you are traveling to your new home via road trip or plane, realize that it will take extra time when you have an infant. Plan for frequent stops along the way for feeding, bathroom, or just to take a break.

Bring a noisemaker or recorded sounds that soothe your baby during the trip.

After the Move

Congratulations! You made it through the journey to your new hoSmallerme. But you’re not finished yet.

  1. Enjoy Your First Meal in Your New Home

Upon arrival, plan for an easy takeout meal on the kitchen floor. You can turn this into a fun picnic by spreading a blanket out and taking your meal together with some paper napkins.

  1. Catch Up on Your Sleep

After you’ve eaten and fed your infant, take a few minutes to unpack your basic essentials. This could include a few blankets to sleep on, or finding your toothbrush in your toiletries bag. From there, do what’s necessary to settle in and enjoy your first night in your new home.

If you can, try to remain consistent with your infant’s sleep schedule. Soon you and your family will adjust to your new home and new routine.

Temporary Relocation

Simplifying Your Temporary Move

Whether you’re moving to graduate school or teaching abroad, temporary moves can be tricky. You don’t want to bring your childhood stuffed animal or large antique dresser, but you just can’t throw them away, either. What should you do?

If you’re preparing to embark on an adventure without all your belongings, use our tips below. We’ll help you navigate your journey and make the most of the process.

Step 1: Get Organized to Simplify Packing

Packing for any type of move is stressful, so pack in an organized fashion to make your temporary move much smoother. First, find or buy more moving boxes than you think you’ll need. That way you won’t have to stop halfway through packing if you run out. Next, tape up your boxes and label each box as one of three things:

  • Take
  • Store
  • Throw Awaya box full of clothes to be donated.

Go through your rooms one at a time and sort everything into boxes labeled as one of these three categories. When you fill a box, put it in a designated corner in your living room and start a new one. Don’t leave the room you’re packing until everything is boxed up. Pretty soon your living room will have three different corners filled with organized boxes.

When you’re packing this way, it’s important to be ruthless. All those old college textbooks you’ve been carrying around need to get tossed for good. Plan to pack less than you can technically bring with you in your Take boxes, and you’ll probably pack exactly what you need.

Step 2: Find a Temporary Tenant

If you plan to move back into the house or condo you own, secure a temporary tenant for the time you’ll be gone. It might be a risk to arrange a month-to-month lease since your tenant can technically terminate at any time, but you won’t be homeless if you decide to come back earlier than planned.

You can also hire a property management company to manage any landlord duties while you’re away. They’ll collect rent and handle rental-agreementcomplaints and maintenance tickets for you.

Step 3: Find Temporary Housing in Your New Area

Long-term housing is often easier to find than temporary housing. As a result, when you’re looking for temporary housing in your new city, state, or country, you might have to think outside the box. Can you find a room to rent through websites like Air BNB? Is anyone from your program moving with you? See if you can move in together to cut costs.

If your stay is quite short, you can always book a room in a long-term hotel.

Step 4: Forward Your Mail

The US Post Office makes mail forwarding simple-you just need to fill out their online form. The process costs a dollar or slightly more, so have your credit card handy.

You can forward your mail in 6-month increments. Just remember to revisit the website and extend your mail forwarding after 6 months if you’re staying longer than that.

Step 5: Store Your Belongings

This should be your final step before you fly out. Be sure to label all boxes by room so they’re easier to unpack when you return.

To stay organized and make the process easier, hire a moving company. Plus, some moving companies offer storage units along with their moving services. You can simplify your move Economy Moversby hiring one company to take care of both tasks.

If you live alone in an apartment, you’ll only need a 10 x 10 unit. If you have a family or a house full furniture, plan to rent a unit that’s at least 10 x 20. If you’re leaving your car, you can park it in the unit, too.

If you follow these tips, your temporary move will be much less stressful. Call a moving company to get started on your new adventure.

rental

Moving Out: Getting back your Security Deposit

Moving is emotionally and physically draining-but the biggest burden usually falls on your finances. Between packing supplies and making a down payment for your next abode, your budget may be tight.

For families and individuals making a move, a return on their original deposit can alleviate some of the burden. Unfortunately, many landlords withhold some or all of this return for a variety of reasons. In fact, a 2013 survey by Rent.com shows that 1 in 4 renters have received no refund on their deposit.

house-renting-257202When it comes to factors that impact your refund, some may be out of your control. For example, most renters who lost their deposit report the cause as moving out early. Some factors, however, are entirely in your control. Most tenants will get a return on their deposit when they fulfill the following obligations:

  • Return the property in its original condition
  • Pay off all rents and money owed
  • Establish a history of responsible tenancy

In other words, following the terms of your contract should get you a refund on the deposit. If you have concerns, take these tips into consideration.

  1. Take an Inventory of Existing Damages

Before you move in, take detailed notes about the condition of the rental space. In the rush and excitement of moving to a new place, it can be easy to overlook small imperfections. By documenting the existing damages, you protect yourself from a forgetful (or vindictive) landlord.

As you take inventory, be sure to perform the following tasks:

  • Turn on and off all lights, faucets, and appliances.
  • Lock and unlock all windows and doors.
  • Test all electrical outlets.
  • Evaluate the cleanliness of all window treatments and drapes.

If there are serious existing damages, it may be wise to photograph them. As you evaluate the premises, be sure to check the balcony, yard, storage area, and garage.rental-agreement

  1. Read and Follow the Terms of the Lease

During your stay, you’ll want to be sure you fully understand the terms of your lease. Some tenants make the mistake of skimming over the paperwork. Then, they learn that they could have easily avoided a lost deposit. As a general rule, your rental agreement will require you to:

  • Clean and remove stains before they set in.
  • Abide by any and all pet policies.
  • Follow customization (painting, installations, etc.) guidelines.
  • Move in and out by a certain date.

Knowing and following the rules will make the experience easier on you and the landlord.

If you have a request outside of the agreed-upon terms, be sure to get your landlord’s consent in writing. This way, all guidelines and updates are properly documented.

  1. Return the Property in Its Original Condition . . . At Least

After you move out, take the time to clean up any messes you have made. If you can’t leave the property better than you found it, return it to its original condition at the very least.

Of course, this step will only be possible if you followed the first tip and took detailed notes about the original condition.

As you prepare your rental for the final cleaning check, be sure to:

  • Close and lock all windows.
  • Remove all tenant-owned furniture and garbage.
  • Sweep and vacuum the floor.
  • Wipe down walls, taking care to remove scuff marks.

From there, your apartment should be in good enough condition to withstand evaluation.

Secure the Entire Deposit

Following these three tips should get you on the path toward a refund of the entire security deposit. As you perform each step, a good rule of thumb is to go above and beyond as often as possible. Let your landlord see that you’ve made the effort to document damages, follow the rules, and return the property in its original condition. When your landlord sees your efforts, he or she will be much more likely to give you back your full deposit.

Stress Free Zone

7 Ways to De-stress During a Move

In 1967, two psychiatrists developed a scale for measuring stress. According to their research, different life changes create different levels of stress in our bodies. If these stress levels get too high, we are more prone to injury and illness.

One of the stressors that Holmes and Rahe identified is a change in residence.

Right alongside that stressor are others, like a change in schools, a change in marital status, and a change in work responsibilities.

A move in and of itself may not cause overwhelming stress. But chances are if you’re moving, you are probably also making some other significant life changes as well. Collectively, these changes can produce a storm of stressors.

You may not be able to control the life changes that come your way. But the good news is that managing the stress they create is possible. Simple de-stressing activities can help you keep calm and healthy amidst the packing and planning you’ll be conquering in the coming months.

Keep a regular exercise routine

True, you might be lifting lots of heavy things, carrying items up and down staircases, and scrubbing walls and windows as you get ready to move. But don’t neglect keeping a regular exercise routine. Thirty minutes a day can greatly reduce stress and anxiety, not to mention help you maintain the energy and strength you’ll need for the big move.

Get regular sleep

If you’re moving in the middle of a change in work, the only hours you have to organize, pack, and clean might be late at night.

It’s okay to work late, but remember that your mind and body will work best when they have proper sleep. Try to keep a consistent bedtime so you can get the most out of your waking hours.

Eat a balanced dietAhealthyfooditems

With all the hustle and bustle of moving, it is easy to let good eating go. But your body needs nutrients to manage stress and maintain health. Include fresh vegetables, fruits, and plenty of drinking water in your daily eating.

Take time to play

Go for a walk, play a board game, or cook your favorite meal. Taking time away from the stressors often gives new clarity and energy. You’ll find that when you come back to the tasks at hand, you’ll be much better equipped to manage problems.

Breathe

Practice breathing deeply for a few minutes each day. You might sit on the ground or on a chair. Close your eyes and focus on inhaling and exhaling. Play some soothing music in the background if that helps.

ChecklistMake a to-do list

When you start getting overwhelmed by how many things still need doing, one of the best ways to get that stress off your shoulders is to write it all down. Take fifteen minutes and a pencil and paper. List all the tasks you need to do, small and large.

Then prioritize the tasks. Which must you do today? Which must you do this week? Writing out upcoming tasks and assigning a time for you to do each one will make the work ahead seem much more doable.

Stay on track with this moving checklist and timeline.

Surround yourself with nature

With all the time our brains and eyes spend on screens, a little bit of nature can go a long way to de-stress. Buy a plant. Find a nearby park. Sit outside and watch clouds. Having a few minutes alone with your thoughts and with nature will leave you feeling refreshed and ready to tackle the stress of moving.Walking

Find a hobby

The act of creating can do wonders for our stress levels. Whether you’re a knitter, a painter, or a model car maker, losing yourself in a new (or forgotten) hobby can alleviate anxiety and help you regain perspective. Even setting aside fifteen minutes a day for your hobby will establish a healthy, consistent pattern that you’ll find yourself enjoying more and more.

Now that you have the tools to de-stress, check out some of Bekins’ other blog posts to get more tips for a smooth, manageable move.

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5 Things to Consider When Planning Your Moving Date

Whether you want to move your family to the big city or you need to plan a corporate move, you have lots of things to consider, including timing. If you go into your moving process knowing the tips below, you can choose the moving date that suits you best.

1. Financial Details

If you understand the timing secrets of the moving industry, you could save a lot of money. Have you ever heard of peak moving season? When it comes down to it, the highest moving volume occurs between Memorial Day and Labor Day in the United

States. According to simple laws of supply and demand, moving rates cost more during this time.

So when planning your cost-effective and frugal move, try to avoid the time between late May to September. You’ll find prices much more affordable when you move during a less busy time. Booking in advance will also help you stay within budget.

2. AvailabilityDSCF0204

In addition to your availability (and any friends helping you move), you want your chosen moving company to have a clear schedule too. In addition to finding a time outside of peak moving season, you should consider the time of month or week.

Movers are always busy on weekends, along with the beginning of the month. To ensure the most convenient pick-up and delivery times, choose a weekday in the middle of the month. This date will give you all the flexibility you want when scheduling with your moving provider.

3. Weather

The weather impacts and affects many moves, often delaying them for days or more than a week. Fair weather contributes to your move’s success as much as the right moving company.

Moving in the summer puts you right in the middle of peak moving season. Don’t forget that a sweltering day will also slow down your movers, no matter which way you look at it. At the same time, moving in the winter comes with certain hazards too.

Choose a temperate season and check the weather ahead of time-and look at the forecast for your destination too. When you choose a day with optimal weather, you will protect your belongings as well as optimize your moving team’s productivity. You can’t control everything, but you can avoid a lot of problems by planning ahead.

4. Adjustment TimeDSCF0301

Whether you have a host of employees or your own family to worry about, you need to give your people time to adjust after a move. If you have to move a company, choose a time when your employees don’t have other events to distract them.

As you make your choice, pay special attention to holiday times, both before and after. Employees may struggle to stay focused if they’re excited for or recovering from winter break.

As for family factors, keep in mind that holidays are a great time to make your goodbyes to family and friends. However, traffic right after a large holiday can prove inconvenient.

You should also take the school calendar into account if you have children at home. A move after the school year ends might make sense until you realize it leaves no time to adjust to moving or say goodbye to friends. Give your family at least a month after the academic year ends to prepare for the move.

5. Personal Preferences

In the end, the best time to move is the date that works most conveniently for you after you’ve considered the above factors. Take time to stop and think about each of these factors when you plan your move.

Consider finances, company availability, the season, and adjustment time. With these factors in mind, you’ll find the best moving date for you, your family, your employees, and everyone else involved.

Fragile

Protect Your Treasures: Tips for Packing Your Collection Before a Move

When a woman took her family baseball card collection for appraisal, she discovered that saving something for sentimental value can yield big rewards. At the “Antiques Roadshow” taping in August 2014, an expert examined the baseball cards, which feature some of America’s earliest baseball players, big names for the Boston Red Stockings in the late 1800s.

Before the appraisal, the owner had turned down an offer of $5,000, suspecting the cards were worth much more-and she was glad she did. The appraiser valued the collection at over $1 million.

But, the sentimental value still trumps the monetary value. The woman has no plans to sell and become an instant millionaire.

Instead, she wants to keep the collection in the family for many more generations.

As a collector, you may understand her reluctance to sell. Whatever you collect, the collection has worth in your eyes not just because of what it’s worth but because of what it represents. When you have to move, you don’t even question whether your collection will move with you. You just wonder how you’ll pack it up so it arrives safely at your new house. If that’s a dilemma you face in the near future, use these tips to pack your collection right.

Fragile Items

Many collectors display their collections inside curio cabinets or other prominent locations. They want family and friends to see their special items. If collectors’ items are fragile, they want that observation to take place with minimal touching.

That principle applies when fragile collections follow their owners to new homes. Protect your too-easily-broken valuables with these suggestions:customer-service-billboard

Buy special moving boxes. Many moving companies or shipping stores sell special boxes for common fragile items. These boxes have dividers to cushion delicate collectibles in transit. These boxes commonly fit dishware, stemware, wine or framed photos or art.

Stock up on cushioned packing materials. People rarely have sufficient bubble wrap, newspaper, and packing peanuts when it comes time to put collections into boxes. Start saving these items as soon as you know you’re moving. You can also put out feelers around the neighborhood and on social media letting people know you’ll take packing materials they get from online orders. Many people throw these materials away, so they probably won’t mind giving them to you.

Mark boxes as “fragile.” This tip should almost go without saying, but you’d be surprised how many times people forget to mark some boxes as holding fragile cargo. Be meticulous about marking boxes. Write “fragile” on more than one side as well as the top. And while you’re at it, note which way is up to avoid damaging the items with tipping and flipping.

Another way to ensure your fragile collection arrives safely is to use professional movers. Movers take care with every box they pick up, transport, and set down, even boxes not marked as “fragile.” If using Bekins Van Lines, talk to your local agent about the precautions that will need to be taken to protect your collection.

Large Collections

Some collections are notable not just for the individual value of each item but for the total items in the collection. If you own 500 snow globes or 200 Madame Alexander dolls, you know what we mean.

The challenge with large collections becomes packing each item with the same care. You also have to gather sufficient packing material for each part. Try these tricks to pack large collections:

Use original boxes whenever possible. Many collectibles come in boxes with custom Styrofoam that fits perfectly around the item. If you still have that packaging, take advantage of its original purpose and put your items back inside for the move.

Pack boxes to a reasonable weight limit. With a large collection, it’s tempting to put as many items as you can in the least number of boxes necessary. But, as any book collector knows, LRjimWrapGlasthat can yield heavy boxes that are hard to lift and easy to drop. Limit most boxes to 30-40 pounds, if possible. Try to keep each box under 50 pounds.

Pay for professional packing services. You might not have time to pack every item in your collection personally. You have a lot to handle during a move, so ask your mover about professional packing services. Trained movers will handle your items with care, so you won’t have to oversee the packing process.

Oddly-Sized Items

Are you a cinema buff who owns original props from your favorite film franchise? Are you bringing your collection of igneous rocks to your new home? Unique, organic, and oddly-shaped collectibles like these rarely come with original packaging to simplify the moving process.

If your collection has strange or one-of-a-kind items, first decide if you want to personally move the ones you value most. You might experience less worry if you bring great-grandpa’s phonograph in your car instead of packing it with everything else.

Next, get an estimate on the price of custom-fit foam packing. The extra expense might be justified on your favorite pieces. Plus, you’ll always have it whenever you need to transport the item later.

Finally, ask a professional moving company how they’d recommend packing unique items. Decide whether you feel comfortable packing it yourself. If not, put your collection in the hands of the pros. Remember, a little extra moving expense is minor compared to the cost of trying to repair or replace a rare collectible.

However you decide to pack your collection, using these tips will help your priceless items arrive at your new home safely.

Relying on professional packing and moving services can alleviate your worries about your collection and allow you to concentrate your energy on other moving considerations.

Moving while Pregnant

7 Tips for Moving While Pregnant

Moving is not an easy task and, if you’re pregnant, it becomes even more difficult. Whether you’re moving across the country or down the street, the packing and stress could leave you with anything from back pains to swollen ankles. Use these tips to avoid the strain and plan a successful, problem-free move for you and your baby.

  1. Find a Babysitter

Before you move, you will need to find a childcare provider in your new area. Looking beforehand will reduce stress and give you enough time to thoroughly search for the perfect person for the job. Use friend references and local ads to start the interviewing process early.

Once you find someone you feel comfortable with, have the person watch your children on moving day. This will act as a test run for the new babysitter and give you a chance to organize and pack without the distraction of your little ones.

If everything goes well with the new babysitter on moving day, you will have someone you can call when the baby comes.Pregnant Bloggin

  1. Start to Pack Early

If you can, start to pack six to eight weeks before moving day. Set a goal to pack two boxes a day and start with items you won’t need within the next few weeks.

Be extra careful when moving items as pregnancy shifts your center of balance. Your hormones also loosen ligaments, which can put extra pressure on joints. To avoid straining your back, place boxes on tables and countertops so you won’t need to bend all the way over to put items in them.

You may also want to hold a packing party with your family and friends. This will reduce the stress on you and allow you to spend quality time together.

  1. Arrange a New Doctor

Closer to the move, you will need to find a doctor in your new area. Talk to your current doctor and ask if he or she has any suggestions for a doctor you may want to contact. You can also look online for doctor reviews to help you narrow your search.

Find a doctor who is covered by your health insurance network and has high approval scores from patients. Once you find the right doctor, have your current doctor’s office transfer your prenatal and medical records to the new hospital.

  1. Pack a Personal Moving-Day Bag

You may have specific items that you like to have with you during your pregnancy. On moving day, pack a bag with any prescriptions, food, lotion, or books that will keep you calm and organized. Pack enough to last you at least a few days while you’re in between homes. These items will reduce stress and help you avoid digging through boxes trying to find your needed prescriptions.

If you’re in your last trimester, keep your hospital bag packed and ready to go. You will need all those items on-hand just in case the baby comes early.

  1. Ask For Help

Moving PregnantAs you go through moving while pregnant, never hesitate to ask for help. You shouldn’t risk your baby because you’re afraid to ask. Even though you may not normally ask for help, consider pregnancy an exception. On the same note, if your friends or family offer help, feel free to accept.

  1. Be Cautious Around Chemicals

Most moves involve deep cleaning and/or painting the old or new house. Be extra cautious around strong chemicals. Use nontoxic cleaning products such as white distilled vinegar or baking soda. If someone else paints or cleans for you, avoid the areas where you can smell these chemicals.

  1. Expect the Unexpected

Pregnancy is an emotional time. To avoid unnecessary stress expect the unexpected. Things may go wrong – deliveries may not come on time and things may break. If things do go wrong, don’t feel bad if you feel overwhelmed, cranky, or weepy. You may need to take a few moments to yourself to cry and then feel better afterword. Take a break and try to think of the positive.

Your number one goal through the moving process should be to take care of yourself and the baby. Drink plenty of water, rest if you feel dizzy, and stay out of the hot sun. You should also consider hiring a moving company to handle the heavy objects.

Now that you know the basics of moving while pregnant, check out our other blogs for more moving tips and tricks.

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Tips to Safely Move Any Kind of Musical Instrument

You know that your couch, your dining room set, your clothes, and your books will all arrive safely at your new home. These items will stay solidly in place in the moving van, and they’ll show up at your front door intact. You don’t have to worry about them.

However, you probably don’t feel the same way about your musical instruments. These complex and somewhat fragile items could easily sustain damage during a trip across the country, even if the truck operator drives carefully. Instruments cost a lot of money, and they allow you to express your emotions through the language of music. If anything happened to yours, you would probably feel devastated.

Luckily, you can take steps to safeguard your instruments while they travel. Read the guide below to find out how.

Pianos and Organs

Most moving companies train their employees to safely move these instruments.piano You don’t have to worry about their wellbeing during the moving process. You can, however, take steps to prepare them for the move:

  • Close and lock the keyboard lid, if possible.
  • Remove any removable parts, like the music stand.
  • Provide blankets, towels, and lots of bubble wrap for wrapping the instrument. Secure all wrapping materials with packing tape or duct tape.
  • Put additional wrapping on the legs and pedals.

You can usually trust your movers to do all of the above. But if you want to supervise the process yourself, just follow those steps.

Violins, Cellos, and Other Stringed Instruments

Stringed instruments have more fragility than other instruments, which makes them tricky to ship. You don’t want fingerboards, bows, or sound-boxes to crack, but even something as simple as a speed bump could cause that kind of damage. Adverse weather conditions could also warp the wood.

To prevent cracking or warping, take the following steps:

http://thinkeryaustin.org/blog/science-woodwinds/

http://thinkeryaustin.org/blog/science-woodwinds/

  • Loosen the instrument’s strings a little bit. Don’t loosen them so much that the bridge falls over—just loosen them enough that the temperature won’t strain them. Cold temperatures will tighten them, while warmer temperatures will loosen them. Leave them loose so these changes won’t pull your strings so tight they snap the fingerboard or headstock.
  • Where applicable, loosen the bow’s hairs for the same reasons.
  • Where applicable, turn all the tuning keys parallel with the headstock so nothing can snap them off.
  • Add some extra padding. Bubble wrap makes for an excellent solution, but you can also use crumpled paper. Wrap your instrument and your bow in these items before placing them on the case. Do not use shredded paper or packing peanuts because these items could get inside your instrument. You’ll have a really hard time getting that back out.
  • If you don’t have a hard case, purchase one. Your instrument will stay safe from moisture and falls this way.

Once you’ve taken all these steps, very little could keep your stringed instrument from arriving at your new home intact.

Trumpets, Clarinets, and Other Brass or Woodwind Instruments

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http://thinkeryaustin.org/blog/science-woodwinds/

Luckily, most brass and woodwind instruments have fairly robust parts. However, a ding or dent in even one part could ruin the entire sound. Keep your brass or woodwind safe by doing the following:

  • Completely take the instrument apart.
  • Wrap all the pieces in bubble wrap.
  • Store them in a hard case. If you do not have one, purchase one. If you can’t purchase one, wrap the pieces in several layers of bubble wrap and towels. You don’t want the pieces to bump into each other or anything else.

These steps may seem simple, but they will help your instrument survive the trip unscathed.

Drum Sets and Other Percussion Instruments

Your drums only need simple protection as well. Simply buy a box a couple inches larger than the drum, then pad the sides, top, and bottom with bubble wrap. If you have larger percussion instruments, like a marimba, depend on your movers to relocate it the same way they move a piano. It will arrive safely.

Use these tips to keep your beloved instrument secure and intact as you move to your new home. Check out the rest of our blog for additional moving tips.

Senior Moving

A Stress-Free Guide to Moving Elderly Parents

As your parents grow older, you may see them begin to struggle living day-to-day. Perhaps they have begun to miss bill payments or have fallen and broken a hip. They may need increased care after developing Alzheimer’s or dementia. At some point, you will need to move them into a safer living environment.

Where will they live? Initially you may consider your home. However, this decision is a major life choice and deserves some serious discussion from you, them, and the rest of your family. Here are some simple things you can do to make the moving process easier:

Coming to the Same Conclusion

Your parents may feel emotionally connected to their home. Expect apprehension when you first bring up moving. They will need time to ponder and accept the idea. Many times seniors feel that moving means losing control of their lives. To help them transition, explain that their opinion matters and that they have a say in where they live. Giving them time to come to the same conclusion as you will help them feel more confident and less distressed.

Talk with your parents at a family meeting with their loved ones. This will give everyone the opportunity to share his or her opinions and views. Active communication in the family will also build a better support system for your parents.

Deciding on Living Arrangements

During this meeting, discuss the level of care your parents will need in their new home. They may require constant supervision and assistance with daily living activities. Most of the time, seniors movingsenior’s care becomes more challenging over time. Consider speaking with a social worker for advice. They can provide valuable suggestions and insight on required care and living arrangements.

The housing situation you choose for your parents will depend on needed care, available facilities, location, and finances.

Create a list of pros and cons for each housing option in your area. Include the distance to relatives as this may cause concern among siblings. Often, family members who live closer have more opportunities to get involved with parents’ care. It’s essential to create an open dialogue with your family and come to an agreement on living conditions.

Understand that your parents have the final say during the decision-making. After all, the living arrangement will ultimately affect them the most.

Before you all decide on a living arrangement, visit the facility. This will help your parents get a feel for the environment, which may play a role into their decision. Take notes on how the employees interact with residents, what activities they provide, and transportation arrangements. You can also research online reviews from past guests.

Sorting Belongings

Most seniors have lived in their homes for many years, which means they have a lot of stuff to sort througsenior_downsizingh. Before you start to pack, go through your parents’ home and organize their belongings. Organize possessions into piles you’re keeping, donating, throwing away, and preserving as keepsakes.

Keep in mind the emotional state of your parents as you go through their things. Allow them time to decide which pile to put their belongings in and reminisce as you sort. Their possessions are more than objects-they’re memories.

As you organize, picture where possessions will go in their new house. How much room do they have? Where will the furniture go? Create a model of the home on paper to help you envision what their new living arrangement will look like.

Hiring a Moving Company

Booking a moving company will help ease the stress on you and your parents. In fact, your parents may feel more comfortable talking with a subjective third party than speaking with their children. Moving companies who specialize in moving seniors will offer comfort to the family. They also take on the burden of lifting heavy objects and ultimately make the process smoother for everyone.

You may want to consider having them pack belongings. They have the tools and knowledge to ensure valuables remain intact.

This allows you to focus on your parents as they transition to their new home.

Cleaning

Even if you hire a moving company, you will still need to clean the home. Whether you plan to rent, sell, or pass the home to a relative, have the entire family come and help. Also, repair any damages now to avoid the problems getting worse. These repairs will prevent rentpianoers or new owners from claiming fake damages.

Settling In

Your parents may need days, weeks, or months to adjust to the new living arrangements. Check in with them often to make sure they feel safe and comfortable. Every person reacts to moving differently. Some feel relief from not having to take of their home. Others feel hesitant to make friends. Most will feel some loss from the life change. Give your parents plenty of family support during this stage. Who knows, they may end up saying, “Why didn’t I do this a long time ago?”

Take the moving process slowly to ensure you and your parents have a smooth transition.