Category Archives: Moving

Web-DSCF0235

What is a delivery spread?

When a sales consultant comes to your home to complete an in-home estimate, they will explain a variety of information. One such topic is your delivery spread. But, what exactly is a delivery spread?

Your sales consultant will give you a set of dates that typically range of 1-14 days for your household goods to arrive at your new home. When you sign the Bill of Lading, you agree to the dates in the window and are expected to accept the delivery within those days. The driver will call you 24-48 hours to let you know the planned date of your delivery. Meanwhile, Bekins will do their best to keep you updated on the delivery date.  A moving agent greeting a customer.

What causes the shipment to take between 1-14 days to be delivered to your new home? There are a variety of factors that goes into determining a delivery spread. The three biggest factors are:

  • The distance between your origin and destination
  • The time of year
  • The weight of your shipment

The farther the distance of the move typically means the wider the spread. Larger shipments are easier to predict days vs. smaller shipments. Smaller shipments allow for more loads on the truck, so a driver may have four or five other families that he has to deliver to or pick up in their shipment spread. For example: If you are moving from New York to Florida, the truck with belongings may be stopping in Richmond, Va. and Atlanta, Ga. before arriving in Florida with your items.

customer-service-billboardIt is a good idea to remain flexible during the delivery spread dates so you are free to accept the delivery on any of those days.  If there are any days in the delivery spread that you will be unavailable to meet the driver, always make a backup plan at the time of booking for someone else to meet the driver on those days, however this is not recommended.

In the rare circumstance your belongings will not be delivered within the delivery spread, Bekins will do what it can to accommodate you and your family. Our Customer Service department will be able to provide you with updates as they occur. If you have any questions about your shipment, please call 1-800-992-5202.

 

DSCF0204

Tips to Safely Move Any Kind of Musical Instrument

You know that your couch, your dining room set, your clothes, and your books will all arrive safely at your new home. These items will stay solidly in place in the moving van, and they’ll show up at your front door intact. You don’t have to worry about them.

However, you probably don’t feel the same way about your musical instruments. These complex and somewhat fragile items could easily sustain damage during a trip across the country, even if the truck operator drives carefully. Instruments cost a lot of money, and they allow you to express your emotions through the language of music. If anything happened to yours, you would probably feel devastated.

Luckily, you can take steps to safeguard your instruments while they travel. Read the guide below to find out how.

Pianos and Organs

Most moving companies train their employees to safely move these instruments.piano You don’t have to worry about their wellbeing during the moving process. You can, however, take steps to prepare them for the move:

  • Close and lock the keyboard lid, if possible.
  • Remove any removable parts, like the music stand.
  • Provide blankets, towels, and lots of bubble wrap for wrapping the instrument. Secure all wrapping materials with packing tape or duct tape.
  • Put additional wrapping on the legs and pedals.

You can usually trust your movers to do all of the above. But if you want to supervise the process yourself, just follow those steps.

Violins, Cellos, and Other Stringed Instruments

Stringed instruments have more fragility than other instruments, which makes them tricky to ship. You don’t want fingerboards, bows, or sound-boxes to crack, but even something as simple as a speed bump could cause that kind of damage. Adverse weather conditions could also warp the wood.

To prevent cracking or warping, take the following steps:

http://thinkeryaustin.org/blog/science-woodwinds/

http://thinkeryaustin.org/blog/science-woodwinds/

  • Loosen the instrument’s strings a little bit. Don’t loosen them so much that the bridge falls over—just loosen them enough that the temperature won’t strain them. Cold temperatures will tighten them, while warmer temperatures will loosen them. Leave them loose so these changes won’t pull your strings so tight they snap the fingerboard or headstock.
  • Where applicable, loosen the bow’s hairs for the same reasons.
  • Where applicable, turn all the tuning keys parallel with the headstock so nothing can snap them off.
  • Add some extra padding. Bubble wrap makes for an excellent solution, but you can also use crumpled paper. Wrap your instrument and your bow in these items before placing them on the case. Do not use shredded paper or packing peanuts because these items could get inside your instrument. You’ll have a really hard time getting that back out.
  • If you don’t have a hard case, purchase one. Your instrument will stay safe from moisture and falls this way.

Once you’ve taken all these steps, very little could keep your stringed instrument from arriving at your new home intact.

Trumpets, Clarinets, and Other Brass or Woodwind Instruments

http://thinkeryaustin.org/blog/science-woodwinds/

http://thinkeryaustin.org/blog/science-woodwinds/

Luckily, most brass and woodwind instruments have fairly robust parts. However, a ding or dent in even one part could ruin the entire sound. Keep your brass or woodwind safe by doing the following:

  • Completely take the instrument apart.
  • Wrap all the pieces in bubble wrap.
  • Store them in a hard case. If you do not have one, purchase one. If you can’t purchase one, wrap the pieces in several layers of bubble wrap and towels. You don’t want the pieces to bump into each other or anything else.

These steps may seem simple, but they will help your instrument survive the trip unscathed.

Drum Sets and Other Percussion Instruments

Your drums only need simple protection as well. Simply buy a box a couple inches larger than the drum, then pad the sides, top, and bottom with bubble wrap. If you have larger percussion instruments, like a marimba, depend on your movers to relocate it the same way they move a piano. It will arrive safely.

Use these tips to keep your beloved instrument secure and intact as you move to your new home. Check out the rest of our blog for additional moving tips.

Senior Moving

A Stress-Free Guide to Moving Elderly Parents

As your parents grow older, you may see them begin to struggle living day-to-day. Perhaps they have begun to miss bill payments or have fallen and broken a hip. They may need increased care after developing Alzheimer’s or dementia. At some point, you will need to move them into a safer living environment.

Where will they live? Initially you may consider your home. However, this decision is a major life choice and deserves some serious discussion from you, them, and the rest of your family. Here are some simple things you can do to make the moving process easier:

Coming to the Same Conclusion

Your parents may feel emotionally connected to their home. Expect apprehension when you first bring up moving. They will need time to ponder and accept the idea. Many times seniors feel that moving means losing control of their lives. To help them transition, explain that their opinion matters and that they have a say in where they live. Giving them time to come to the same conclusion as you will help them feel more confident and less distressed.

Talk with your parents at a family meeting with their loved ones. This will give everyone the opportunity to share his or her opinions and views. Active communication in the family will also build a better support system for your parents.

Deciding on Living Arrangements

During this meeting, discuss the level of care your parents will need in their new home. They may require constant supervision and assistance with daily living activities. Most of the time, seniors movingsenior’s care becomes more challenging over time. Consider speaking with a social worker for advice. They can provide valuable suggestions and insight on required care and living arrangements.

The housing situation you choose for your parents will depend on needed care, available facilities, location, and finances.

Create a list of pros and cons for each housing option in your area. Include the distance to relatives as this may cause concern among siblings. Often, family members who live closer have more opportunities to get involved with parents’ care. It’s essential to create an open dialogue with your family and come to an agreement on living conditions.

Understand that your parents have the final say during the decision-making. After all, the living arrangement will ultimately affect them the most.

Before you all decide on a living arrangement, visit the facility. This will help your parents get a feel for the environment, which may play a role into their decision. Take notes on how the employees interact with residents, what activities they provide, and transportation arrangements. You can also research online reviews from past guests.

Sorting Belongings

Most seniors have lived in their homes for many years, which means they have a lot of stuff to sort througsenior_downsizingh. Before you start to pack, go through your parents’ home and organize their belongings. Organize possessions into piles you’re keeping, donating, throwing away, and preserving as keepsakes.

Keep in mind the emotional state of your parents as you go through their things. Allow them time to decide which pile to put their belongings in and reminisce as you sort. Their possessions are more than objects-they’re memories.

As you organize, picture where possessions will go in their new house. How much room do they have? Where will the furniture go? Create a model of the home on paper to help you envision what their new living arrangement will look like.

Hiring a Moving Company

Booking a moving company will help ease the stress on you and your parents. In fact, your parents may feel more comfortable talking with a subjective third party than speaking with their children. Moving companies who specialize in moving seniors will offer comfort to the family. They also take on the burden of lifting heavy objects and ultimately make the process smoother for everyone.

You may want to consider having them pack belongings. They have the tools and knowledge to ensure valuables remain intact.

This allows you to focus on your parents as they transition to their new home.

Cleaning

Even if you hire a moving company, you will still need to clean the home. Whether you plan to rent, sell, or pass the home to a relative, have the entire family come and help. Also, repair any damages now to avoid the problems getting worse. These repairs will prevent rentpianoers or new owners from claiming fake damages.

Settling In

Your parents may need days, weeks, or months to adjust to the new living arrangements. Check in with them often to make sure they feel safe and comfortable. Every person reacts to moving differently. Some feel relief from not having to take of their home. Others feel hesitant to make friends. Most will feel some loss from the life change. Give your parents plenty of family support during this stage. Who knows, they may end up saying, “Why didn’t I do this a long time ago?”

Take the moving process slowly to ensure you and your parents have a smooth transition.

East-West Coast

What You Should Know About Moving from the East Coast to the West Coast

You didn’t know it before you relocated, but moving from the East Coast to the West Coast can compare to moving to another country. You assumed that everything would work the same way-after all, you moved from an American city to another. How different could it really be?

The United States stretches across an entire continent, so it contains myriad attitudes and cultures. In fact, you can think of each state as its own miniature country. Each has a different set of laws and traditions, and the farther you travel from your home state, the more different the culture can become.

So, if you recently moved from coast to coast, you probably experienced some culture shock. But don’t worry. Below, we’ve given you tips so you can better understand the new area and feel more at home.

1. Job Prospects

1395308240_silicon-valley-sign-lg-300x148If you list the biggest and most successful companies you can think of, your list probably includes companies like:

  • Amazon
  • Apple
  • eBay
  • Facebook
  • Google
  • Microsoft
  • Twitter
  • Yahoo
  • YouTube

These companies all have a reputation for innovation and creativity (in addition to vast riches). They also have something else in common: they all come from the West Coast. You can also find thousands of other established or start-up companies.

Since the West Coast houses so many large, successful companies, residents have access to tons of jobs. This allows them (as a whole) to feel more relaxed and secure. Many people still have to deal with unemployment, but they almost always have good occupational prospects.

2. Cost of Living

This doesn’t apply to every area on the West Coast, but overall, major cities on the West Coast tend to have a lower cost of living than comparable cities on the East Coast. This takes a little stress off of West Coast residents, and it gives them more purchasing power for luxury items.

However, your move doesn’t guarantee that you’ll suddenly feel richer. Compare the cost of living in your old area and your new one. On average, West Coasters get more bang for their buck.

3. Mild Weather

If you lived in the Northeast, you probably feel anger, annoyance, or fear when you hear the

http://blog.forbestravelguide.com/top-five-socal-beaches/2-la-jolla-shores-beach

http://blog.forbestravelguide.com/top-five-socal-beaches/2-la-jolla-shores-beach

term “polar vortex.” Luckily, now that you’ve moved to the opposite coast, you don’t have to worry about it. Sure, the West Coast has its share of unpleasant weather patterns, but you won’t have to worry about drastic ones like polar vortexes or hurricanes.

That being said, you may have to adjust to the climate depending on where you move. If you relocate from Florida to Oregon, you’ll have the opportunity to experience stunning, but frigid, snow storms. But if you move from Maine to California, you’ll have to get used to the yearlong heat.

4. Vacation Destinations

Have you ever dreamed of traveling to Asia or Hawaii? The West Coast gives you easy access. You’ll sit through a 4.5 hour flight if you want to visit Hawaii, which features all kinds of activities from surfing to volcano exploration. And if you want to see Tokyo or Shanghai, you’ll experience a shorter flight as well. After all, you only have to fly across an ocean. You don’t have to fly across a continent as well.

You’ll also have access to a wide variety of domestic vacation destinations if you live on the West Coast. Your new home puts you in close proximity to the following:

  • Death Valley National Park

    Mount Saint Helens National Monument

    Mount Saint Helens National Monument

  • Disneyland (which has its own, unique charm that is utterly different from Disneyworld)
  • Grand Canyon National Park
  • Hollywood
  • Mount Saint Helens National Monument
  • Olympic National Park
  • The Golden Gate Bridge
  • Yellowstone National Park
  • Yosemite National Park

5. Extreme Sport Opportunities

Because the West Coast boasts everything from towering, snow-capped mountains to scorching deserts, you can participate in any kind of extreme sport you want, including:

  • Base jumping
  • BMX biking
  • Kite surfing
  • Motocross
  • Paragliding
  • Rock climbing
  • Skiing/snowboarding
  • White water rafting

If you feel like you’ve moved to another country, don’t worry. Use these tips to get started and you’ll feel right at home soon.

If you would like the move from the East Coast to the West Coast, Bekins can help – Find a local agent.

DSCF0301

9 Reasons Relocating in the Winter is the Right Move

With some preparation, winter might be the easiest and cheapest time to move. Plus, who wants to wait until the busy spring and summer months to relocate? Here are the top 10 reasons to consider moving in the winter: 

Why You Should Move in the Winter

    • Moving in the winter can save you money when hiring a moving company. Most household moving companies have cheaper rates compared to the peakCoupon - Copy moving months (May to September). Bekins currently offers This is moving. Relocation Prograwhere you can save $150 and receive other service guarantees on your upcoming move.
    • Movers are more flexible with dates in the winter. You may not need to give as much notice or you may even get your household goods quicker.
    • Weather permitting, travel can be quicker due to the lack of cars and construction on the roads.
    • There are less homes on the market during the winter and sellers often are eager to move from their residences.
    • There can be fewer buyers during the winter because more people prefer to move in the warmer months.
    • Due to a decrease in volume during the winter, mortgage lenders usually have fewer loans and less paperwork to process.
    • Due to the slower market, real estate professionals have more time to devote to your search for a new home.
    • Lenders may forgo certain fees to stay busy in the off-season.
    • Because landlords want to fill vacant apartments and homes in the winter, they are more likely to entice you to move with bonus offers, lower rent or a smaller deposit.

To learn more about how to organize a winter move and how to make your move as easy and stress-free as it can possibly be, contact Bekins for a free moving quote. Don’t allow the thought of bad weather to interfere with making the right move!

skd273191sdc

Moving? How to Help Kids Adjust to a New Community

Moving can be exciting and exhilarating for people of all ages. Moving brings the promise of a fresh start, interesting places and faces, and new adventures.

But moving also means leaving friends, familiar places, and sights of home behind. While leaving these things behind is hard for adults, children and teenagers often experience additional difficulty. Children may feel intimidated by the thought of living in a new town, attending a new school, and making new friends.

Moving doesn’t have to be scary or intimidating though. Use the tips below to help your kids adjust to a new community.

Make Special Considerations for Children of Different Ages

Your children’s ages and personalities affect how they will respond to moving. While one of your children might adapt easily to a new place, another might need more help and emotional support to make the adjustment. Keep the following in mind:

  • Infants, toddlers, and preschoolers will not understand the meaning and complexity of a move. They don’t interact with very many people outside of the home, and they don’t experience change very often. Young children thrive on predictably, so try to keep their routines as normal as possible once you’ve moved.
  • Elementary school-aged children want to fit in with their peers. As a result, your children might feel scared about living in a new community. Focus on the excitement of attending nervous-boy-back-to-schoola new school and meeting new people. Tell them about a person or group of people, such as immigrants, who overcame their fears to come to exciting new places.
  • Although teens are old enough to understand the need to move, they might resist change. Teens may feel like they can’t establish valuable friendships in a new community, which might make it hard for them to transition into a new school. Moving is especially hard on teens who participate in sports or other extracurricular activities. To help ease your teens’ worry, research the programs in your new town. Does the high school have a state championship swimming team? Is there a state-of-the-art performance hall?

You have to focus on the positive to help kids transition to a new. Listen to their questions and concerns, and reassure them that they have things to look forward to.

Provide Support After the Move

The first few months in a new town prove volatile for many children, so pay extra attention to their emotional needs. Here are a few ways you can provide emotional support as your children settle into a new community:

  • Explore your new community. Visiting nearby parks and finding the best local restaurants can help your whole family feel more at home.

    Teenagers Basketball

    Photo credit: USNews.com

  • Find ways for your children to get involved in the new community. If your children participated in music or drama clubs in your former town, help them get involved in the same activities in your new town.
  • Encourage your children to express their feelings. Many children want to know that they have a friend and confidant who understands what they’re going through. You can be that confidant. Listen carefully and intently as your children vent their frustrations. Don’t get short with them, as this can make them feel even more insecure.

Set an Example for Your Children

Children of all ages take cues from their parents, especially in new or scary situations. As you settle into your new community, model the kind of behavior and attitude you want your children to adopt. For example:

  • Socialize with families in your new neighborhood. If you encourage your kids to get involved in the community but never leave the house, your children might take this is as a sign that they don’t need to branch out. Invite your neighbors and their children over for a dessert night. This will allow your children to meet new people in a nChildrenon-threatening setting.
  • Stay up-to-date on events at school and in the community. The more you know and learn about your new community, the more your children will feel at home. On the other hand, the less you know about the community, the less likely your children are to embrace their new surroundings.
  • Don’t complain about your new house or community in front of your kids. Chances are, you’ll feel frustrated or stressed about unpacking and settling into a new home. Try not to let your children see this frustration. If they hear you badmouthing your new community, they might do the same. This makes it harder for them to settle in.

Adjusting to a new community doesn’t have to be stressful or scary for you or your children. Focus on the positive aspects of the new community. Provide outlets from your children to vent their feelings and frustration. Set an example for them to look to as they adjust. By helping them feel at home in a new community, you’ll be able to enjoy your new adventure that much more.

Sweet winter home

7 Tips to Make Your Winter Move Easier

Whether you finally found your dream home, or your job transferred you to a new location, moving in winter offers a lot of benefits. Winter is the off season for many companies, so you may enjoy better rates and more flexible moving dates. And in the colder seasons, roads tend to have less traffic, resulting in shorter, faster drives.

However, moving in winter also has its shortcomings. Poor weather and icy roads turn an otherwise safe journey into a harrowing experience. Fortunately, you can make the trip easier with these cold-weather tips.

1. Check the Weather

HeadlightsAs you pack and prep for the upcoming move, periodically check weather reports. Schedule your moving day during a bout of warmer weather, but give yourself a range of acceptable moving days in case the weather turns dangerous.

Even if the weather is supposed to be clear on your moving day, stay ready to call off the move at a moment’s notice. Weather can prove fickle, especially in Indiana. You’ll do better to postpone your moving trip in favor of better conditions than to work in the ice and the cold.

2. Keep Winter Supplies on Hand

Even if you plan to move to a warmer climate, you’ll want to keep your winter gear on hand while you move. Items such as a snow shovel, ice scraper, and salt will help you clear a path safely through the snow, while winter clothing such as heavier coats, hats, and gloves will help you stay warm while you move.

As you dress for your move, layer your clothing. Layers keep warm air from escaping and provide better insulation. This will keep you warmer during colder conditions. And since you may be moving heavier boxes and working harder, the layers enable you to shed unnecessary clothing to prevent overheating.

3. Clear Snow from Walkways

Moving boxes, appliances, and furniture is hard enough. You don’t want to have to deal with slip and falls on top of your move.

Use your snow shovel to clear a path through the driveway, sidewalk, and any other places Clear the Walkwaysyou and your crew will move consistently. Use salt to melt the ice faster and sand to provide traction.

If you hire a moving company to help you, make sure the company has a liability and protection plan in place. This will ensure that both the movers and your items have coverage in the case of an accident. If someone slips and falls on the sidewalk, you won’t have to worry about paying for medical coverage or for replacing your glassware.

4. Use Cardboard and Sheeting to Protect Floors

Even if you do a careful job clearing ice and snow from your driveway, chances are likely that you’ll track some of the slush into your home. The water, mud, and other debris can soak into and damage your carpet, and as a result, you may have to spend more time cleaning your home before you lock up.

Additionally, icy water on tile or wood floors poses a safety risk for you and your movers. The slick surface combined with limited visibility from heavy furniture create the perfect setup for an injury.

You can keep your flooring and your team safe by laying cardboard and sheeting near the entryways and other areas that see a lot of foot traffic on moving day. Keep towels near the front door to dry off dolly wheels and other moving equipment.

5. Board Your Pets

While you’ll want to take your beloved Fluffy along for the move, you don’t want your furry friend to frolic underfoot during the moving process. With multiple people traveling in and out of your home, someone might step on a paw or tail. Or in the excitement of the day’s events, your pet might slip out the door unnoticed.

Rather than spending hours tending to a pet’s injury or searching for a missing pet, take your pet to a local animal boarding facility. If you have a tight budget, consider asking your neighbor to watch your dog or cat for a few hours while you move.

6. Stay Warm with Hot Drinks

Constant changes between the warmth of your house anCup-of-black-coffeed the cold air from the outside take a toll on your body. While you might not immediately notice your dehydration, you may notice that it’s easier to become fatigued while moving heavier items.

Do your body a favor by drinking regularly while you move. If cold water sounds unpleasant in the chilly weather, opt for warmer drinks like hot cocoa, cider, or tea. Don’t forget to offer some to your moving team-they’ll likely appreciate it!

7. Call the Professionals

If you have a large family and a group of friendly neighbors to help you during the move, you may feel tempted to save money and pack your items yourself. However, not everyone is equipped to handle cold weather ventures, and this increases the risk of injury to you, your family, and your items.

When moving in winter, you’ll have better success transporting your valuables if you call on a professional moving team. With the right moving company, you can move your items quickly and safely. Don’t hesitate to ask professionals to assist you in your next winter move-with these tips, you’ll be out of your old home and into your new home in almost no time!

Home for the Holidays

How to Make Your New House Feel Like Home for the Holidays

You already know that there’s no place like home for the holidays-but you’ve just left your old, comfortable home and its many holiday memories behind. You’ve left old friends and family members who usually celebrate with you. You might be dreading your next holiday season instead of looking forward to it.

Moving to a new home doesn’t consign you to a lonely holiday, though. In fact, celebrating your first holiday season in a new house can an exciting time full of new and interesting experiences. Follow the tips below to banish the holiday moving blues and enjoy the holiday season to the fullest.

1. Learn about Holiday Activities in Your Area

Maybe your hometown had an ice skating rink where you took the kids every winter. Or your old city had an annual lights-on celebration that you and your significant other attended every year without fail.

You’re probably not going to find the exact same celebrations and venues in your new city, and it’s okay to feel sad about that.

But even though it can’t replicate the exact experiences from your hometown, your new town probably has something just as fun to offer. In time, you might come tSouthwestSkylineRinko value these new holiday activities just as much-if not more-than those you participated in back home.

Look around for city celebrations not just in your new town, but the surrounding towns. Find out about holiday-themed concerts, sing-alongs, plays, and movies. Look for free activities for kids at local libraries and museums. See if your local recreation center offers hockey lessons. Do whatever you can to get you and your family in the holiday spirit while getting involved in local events.

In the process, you’ll create a new tradition that your family will value throughout the coming years.

2. Put up New Holiday Decorations

Chances are, your traditional holiday decorations are still packed away in a box, and that box is probably buried under hundreds of other boxes. Even if you had the tiChristmas Decorationsme to hang up holiday decorations while unpacking everything else, chances are low that you could even find the box.

However, holiday decorations can really help you set a holiday mood in your home. If you can’t find your old decorations, buy a few new decorations around town. Even a small wreath on the front door can make your home seem more festive.

Your kids might feel particularly lonely after moving away from their friends during the holiday season. They might not feel like their new house is quite a home yet. To help them turn the new house into their own space, let them choose a few holiday decorations for themselves. Giving kids a choice and a sense of independence can go a long way towards making them feel more comfortable in their new home, as well as getting them excited for the holidays.

3. Get to Know Your Neighbors

You’ll need to meet your neighbors sooner or later. Why not break the ice with a holiday-themed welcoming snack? Bring your favorite homemade cookies or another treat over to your neighbors’ houses. While you’re at it, ask about their favorite local holiday traditions. They’ve lived here longer than you have and probably have some insight into the city’s best holiday activities.

Invite your neighbors for drinks and games sometime during the holiday season. Simply having people in your house can make it feel homier just in time for the holidays.

4. Start a New Tradition

Most people cling to old traditions during the holiday seasons. You might worry that without the annual trip to Grandma’s house on Christmas day or the family Hanukkah gathering at your aunt’s house, the holidays just won’t feel the same.

You’re probably right-you can’t recreate the exact experience you had at your old home. However, this doesn’t mean you should give up hope for a happy holiday season. Since you can’t participate in all of the activities you used to back home, why not start a few new traditions? Ask the kids for input, and decide on a few family activitiesHoliday Decorations that everyone can enjoy. Maybe staying in for a hot chocolate and movie night once a week during the holiday season will become your new favorite tradition.

It’s okay to experiment; not everything you try during the first holiday season in your new home will stick. As long as you find a few holiday-centric activities that bring your family closer together during the move, you’ll have spent your time well. You can always adjust your activities next year.

It’s also okay to give the kids-and yourself-a sense of stability by relying on some of your oldest holiday traditions. Modify your most important holiday traditions for your new home. The combination of new and old traditions will make for a dynamic, exciting season.

If you have to move during the holiday season, don’t despair. These tips can help you transform your new home into a holiday friendly zone. Follow the above four steps, and you and your family will get your new home off to the perfect start by making exciting new holiday memories.

Fridge

9 Ways to Eat Healthy During a Move

We’ll be the first to admit that moving can be exhausting and stressful. It might seem like there aren’t enough hours in the day to get everything on your seemingly endless to-do list done. And chances are, cooking and eating healthy might be the last thing on your mind.

But by focusing on eating right during your move, you can save money and a keep few inches off your waistline. Eating healthy foods will also boost your energy, which will provide some much-needed motivation throughout your move.

Keep these healthy eating tips in mind as you prepare to move to your new home.

Before the Move

Free Bekins Weekly Meal Planner

Free Bekins Weekly Meal Planner

Preparation is the key to any successful move, and the same is true for eating healthy during your move. Before you even start packing, be sure to take the following steps:

  1. Make a plan.

How far out is your move? If it’s two weeks away, create a daily menu for what you’ll eat each day leading up to the move. Good meals to make during a move include soups and stews, casseroles, and pastas. You can make these dishes in bulk, so you’ll be able to eat them for at least two or three days.

Creating a menu will help alleviate the stress you feel as your schedule gets busier and busier. Once you’ve made your meal plan, set aside any utensils you’ll need to make these meals. You can pack these utensils together right before you actually hit the road.

  1. Clear out your refrigerator, freezer, and pantry.

It’s tempting to eat out every night leading up to a move. But you’ll save a lot of money by using food that you already have. Plan your daily meals around what you already have in your refrigerator and freezer. You should only buy food to complete these meals.

Bekins Weekly Meal Planner

While You’re Packing

While looking for a home and filling out paperwork is stressful, packing your belongings is perhaps the most stressful and chaotic task of all. Keep the following tips in mind as you strive to eat healthy while you’re packing:

  1. Keep time in perspective.

At the end of a long day of packing, all you’ll want to do grab some fPositive family preparing lunch togetherast food or order a pizza.  Keep in mind that it will take about the same amount of time to prepare a meal as it would to have a pizza delivered. Plus, you’ll feel less guilty after preparing a home cooked meal than you would after eating pizza.

  1. Ask for help.

Don’t be afraid to enlist the help of your friends or family members. Chances are, your friends or kids would be happy to whip up a healthy meal. Remember: many hands make light work.

While You’re Traveling

Whether you’re moving a few miles away or across the country, driving will make you tired. And when you’re tired, a burger and fries might sound like the most delicious thing in the world. But heavy, processed fast food will make you even more tired. Eat healthy while you’re on the road by doing the following:

Land O Lakes blog

Land O Lakes blog

  1. Pack your meals ahead of time.

Prepare a few meals the night before you hit the road. Store them on ice in a cooler, and be sure to replace ice as needed along the way.

Foods that travel well include:

  • Fruits: apples, oranges, grapes, and bananas
  • Vegetables: carrots, celery, snap peas, and bell peppers
  • Cold pasta
  • Green salads (be sure to keep dressing in a separate container)
  • Hummus
  • Hard-boiled eggs
  • Jerky
  • Pre-cooked or chilled meats: turkey, chicken, salmon
  • Pre-made wraps or sandwiches

Be sure to pack separate meals for every person in the car. This will eliminate the hassle of taking out all of the food and divvying it out to each person.

  1. Plan ahead if you’ll be eating out.

You don’t have to completely avoid eating out en route to your new home. If you want to eat out on the road, find a restaurant that serves healthy options.

  1. Stay busy while you drive.

Driving on long, wide highways can be boring. To keep yourself from dozing off, you may want to munch on salty or sweet snacks. Keep your munching to a minimum by listening to music and talking with those in the car.

After the Move

AhealthyfooditemsArriving at your new home will surely bring a huge sigh of relief. To continue your healthy eating habits and settle in as quickly as possible, keep the following in mind:

  1. Unpack kitchen utensils first.

Remember that box of kitchen utensils you packed right before you moved? That should be the first box you unpack in your new home.

Rather than ordering a pizza from a local restaurant your first night in the new house, make dinner. You can run to a local grocery store to pick up a few items to make your first meal in your new home. This will help make your new house feel more like home.

  1. Keep your meals simple.

You’ll want to keep your meals as simple as possible until you unpack all of your boxes and really settle into your new home. For simple, healthy meals, stock up on proteins and produce.

Moving doesn’t have to take a toll on your emotional and physical health. By eating healthy during your move, you’ll be able to tackle your to-do list and maintain a positive attitude.

King Park Indianapolis

The Secret of Moving to the Suburbs Without Losing the Perks of City Life

When you first moved to the city for college and stayed to build your career, you may have resolved never to leave. But now you’ve established yourself in your career and settled down to raise a family. At this stage in life, you’re not alone if you no longer view city life through rose-colored glasses. Gradually, you realize you’re tired of facing the realities of city life like:

  • Finding parking spots
  • Carrying groceries through streets and up flights of stairs
  • Dealing with noisy neighbors
  • Wrangling toddlers in small apartments with no yard space

Still, the city hasn’t entirely lost its allure. You hate to sacrifice what you love about the city just to overcome a few annoyances. Lucky for you, many suburban communities offer perks similar to city-dwelling but without the stuff that bothers you. If it’s time to consider a move to the suburbs, here’s how to do it without giving up what you love about city life.

Experience the Ambiance

The move from the city to the suburbs often causes people to wax nostalgic about the unique aspects of city dwelling. They don’t want to say goodbye to all-night take-out places, one-of-a-kind clothing boutiques, and well-maintained city parks. But, many suburban centers have similar perks. Plus, these sites are usually less crowded outside of city limits.

Make a list of your must-haves or nice-to-haves for a suburban community. Think rec centers, local theaters, concert venues, bars, nightclubs, or whatever else you typically do in the city. Then drive around and look for those options every time you go house hunting. Park the car and take a walk downtown. Go into the shopping mall. You might be surprised at the array of stores it offers. In short, be on the lookout for places that can become your new favorites.

However, be cautious about clinging too much to any one suburban downtown area. It’s only one factor in what creates a community’s atmosphere. Interact with the people you pass on the street. Many suburbs have replaced the isolated, city-life mindset with more neighborly patterns of interaction. Strike up a conversation with someone at the local coffee shop and ask about the area. Watch for friendly interactions among store clerks and customers to get a sense of the community atmosphere.

Visit Local Schools

Shutterstock.com

Shutterstock.com

In the city, a top school frequently means an expensive private school. But your kids can obtain a quality education at a public school in the suburbs. No wonder almost every family moving to the suburbs has “top-rated school system” at the top of their must-have list-even families without kids yet. As you evaluate area schools, examine these factors:

  1. Look beyond test scores. Kids are more than their test scores, and so are schools. Test scores are only an end way of measuring a school’s performance. Class size is a better indicator of how much personal attention your child will receive from teachers-smaller is better.
  1. Examine all grade levels. You might be making the move to the suburbs when your children are barely in preschool, but you could live in your new house until they head off for college. With that in mind, visit schools for all grade levels in the area. Make sure the middle school and high school options meet your education standards, too.
  1. Make sure your favorite extracurricular activities have community support. You can’t predict which hobbies your kids will adopt as they get older, but you can make a few good guesses. If you take your kids to the theater frequently, make sure the school district has a strong history of supporting the arts. If you attend sporting events, look for a school with an established sports program. You want your kids to have options when they start developing their non-academic skills.

Consider the Commute

For many people making the switch from city to suburb, the extended commute becomes a primary consideration. After all, what’s the point of finding a larger, quieter living space if you’re hardly home to enjoy it? For any community you consider moving into, think about these factors that will affect your commute:

  1. Public transportation. Does the thought of fighting rush hour twice a workday send your blood pressure through the roof? If so, look for a suburb with public transportation options built for commuters. Don’t just locate the local train station on the map. Actually visit it. You need to know about parking availability and overall convenience. You could even take a test train ride into the city to time the trip and gauge the crowds.
  1. Carpool lanes and toll roads. If you don’t mind driving, you’ll probably still want options to speed up your commute. When you make the hull out to the suburbs to house hunt, pay attention to the highway and calculate the cost of paying for less-crowded toll roads. Look out for carpool lanes. If you see any, ask around at the office if any co-workers would share the ride with you.
  1. Working from home. Increasing numbers of suburban dwellers have cut their commute down to the time it takes them to walk from the bedroom to the office-they telecommute. That might not be an option every day, but your supervisor might be willing to let you work from home a few days a week.

Finally, estimate how often you envision yourself heading into the city for reasons other than work. If you think you’ll visit it more than once or twice a month, look for suburbs just outside the main hub to cut down on your travel time. That way your favorite city spots won’t be too far away.

Your trek to the suburbs can yield many of the amenities that city life does. Use these tips to find the perfect community and home for you. Once you’ve found it, call a moving company to arrange moving your belongings. Get ready to make new memories that will last a lifetime in a space that won’t feel cramped as your family grows.

If you want to make the move from the city to the suburbs, a local agent  in your area will be able to assist you with all of your moving needs.