Category Archives: Moving

old-couple-boxes

3 Strategies to Downsize Your Home Without Regret

When you downsize your home, it often feels like you’re downsizing your life. However, clearing your life of extra possessions can leave more room for what matters-people and experiences.

There are many ways you can sort your items to determine what to leave behind. However, going from the biggest and most obvious items down to the most sentimental is more manageable for many people. Read below to learn how to carry out this strategy during your next move.

1. If It Doesn’t Fit, You Don’t Need It
This strategy works best if you’ve already walked around your new place. Once you can gauge DSCF3144how big your new rooms are, you’ll have a better idea of what furniture you’ll need. You’ll also know which furniture items you’ll need to replace with smaller versions.

The main items to downsize in the furniture department are couches, shelves, and tables. If you are moving to a smaller home because all your kids are grown, do you really need a dining room table that seats eight? If you now live alone, do you need both a couch and a loveseat?

If you’re moving to a condo, apartment, or a smaller yard, you can apply this strategy to outdoor equipment as well. If you don’t need a riding lawnmower and it won’t fit in your new place, don’t keep it.

The key is to sell what doesn’t fit so you can put that money towards high-quality items that you will use and love. If you don’t need a full-size couch, you can indulge in a brand-new loveseat that will suit you much better.

2. Be Ruthless with Your Clothes
Most people have far more clothing than they ever wear. So how do you get rid of the extras? The simplest way is to use the three-box method. Label three boxes as “donate,” “trash,” and “keep.” If it has holes or deodorant stains, it goes in the trash. If you wear a shirt multiple times a month, keep it.

a box full of clothes to be donated.Your “donate” box is for clothing that you don’t actually wear. If you haven’t worn something in over a year, you probably won’t wear it ever again. Be ruthless-you’ve had plenty of chances to wear those pants, but you didn’t, so give it to someone who will.

Donating your clothes to a reputable charity can help you feel better about losing your belongings. A pair of dress pants you wore once can help someone get a job. A t-shirt you got for free can clothe a child in foster care.

Of course, you can feel free to exempt one-use only items like wedding dresses from ruthless purging.

3. Preserve Sentimental Belongings that Make You Happy
senior_downsizingWe all have belongings that mean something, whether they’re your grandmother’s china, your daughter’s baby clothes, or a stack of your child’s drawings. Sentimental items are the hardest to part with because of the emotions that they stand for.

This means that instead of being completely logical about it, you need to get your emotions involved if you want to part with them. Only hold on to things that make you feel happy, not things that bring up bad memories, resentment, or other negative emotions.

As you sort, touch every item and ask yourself, “Does this make me feel joy?” If not, consider donating or selling it. If it’s something large, take a picture. You can also scan children’s drawings and keep them in a digital album.

Downsizing can seem like a stressful process, but when you follow these steps, it can go smoothly and cause less emotional strain. If you’re relocating or downsizing, call your local moving company for a moving estimate.

Office Moving

Stay Cool During your Summer Move

It’s hot outside and you feel as if you can cut the humid air with a knife and are just dreading the thought of packing and loading all of your stuff. Not only is this uncomfortable, but moving in the heat could be dangerous if you don’t take precautions. Below are some tips to stay safe in the heat during your move.

Stay Hydrated 

Your body will need more water to stay hydrated and keep your core body temperature where it needs to be. Drink 5-7 ounces of fluids every 15 to 20 minutes to replenish the necessary fluids in your body. Beverages with electrolytes will keep yourself energized, waterbut avoid energy drinks.

Also, eat foods that will give your energy while not dehydrating you. Instead of foods with high sodium content (salt) opt for fruits, vegetables, nuts and protein to help get you through the day. Also avoid caffeine and alcohol which can speed up dehydration.

AC on both ends of the move

If possible, don’t turn off your electricity in your new home until the day after you move, and schedule the power to be turned on in your new home a day before you move in. That way, you will be able to use your air conditioning during loading and delivery. If you don’t have air conditioning, consider buying fans to keep you cool keep during your move.

Dress Appropriately

Dress in a light colored t-shirt and in shorts to help keep cool. Lighter clothes will improve your circulation during the move, which helps prevent heat stroke and heat exhaustion. If the temperature is very hot, dampen a towel or cloth in cold water and place it on top of your shoulders. This may sound uncomfortable, but it will help keep your core body temperature down.

Take Breaks

It’s hard to do, especially when moving, but try not to over exert yourself. Rest frequently in a cool spot. Try to move items either early morning or later in the day when it may be cooler.

SunscreenWear sunscreen

Use a sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15. Apply the sunscreen over exposed skin and reapply every two hours, especially if you are sweating profusely. It is also a good idea to wear a hat to protect your scalp from getting burnt.

Hire a professional mover

Sit back and relax in the air conditioning while professional movers do all the work. Professional movers are trained to take care of themselves in extreme temperature. There won’t be any risk of you overheating or even breaking a sweat.

Learn more about Bekins professional moving services.

 

References: Mayo Clinic, News Medical 

 

 

Attractive young adult couple lying on home floor with coffee cups smiling and looking at blueprints.

Preparing to Move Into your Larger Home

If you’ve spent years in a small apartment or modest home, you already understand the limits of space more than those who live in a larger home.

Of course, some people prefer a small space. But if your family or employment needs change, you may decide to move to a new city and a larger home. Just imagine how much easier your life will be when you actually have room for your current belongings!

However, upsizing holds a few challenges as well as rewards. The more you understand what a larger space means for you, the better you can prepare-not just for moving day, but for all the days afterward.

Downsize Your Belongings a box full of clothes to be donated.

If you want to really enjoy your large new home, cut the clutter before you arrive. Even though everything you currently own will easily fit in your new place, that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t purge some belongings before the movers arrive. There’s no point in paying your movers to box up the books you never read or pack the faded drapes that don’t match your new décor.

Additionally, too much junk is a challenge no matter your home’s size. Even if you have ample room in your new house, you won’t feel much like sorting out the junk once you arrive. Do it now instead.

Prepare Ahead to Save Money in a Larger Space

Although you may be tempted to buy more furnishings right away, resist the temptation to overspend. Unpack a little at a time and see how your current belongings look and feel in your new space.

Also, since you’ve only seen your furnishings in the context of a smaller home, it will take time to adjust to the bare walls and emptier-than-normal rooms. Allow yourself several weeks to simply live with your new environment before you consider adding more furniture or other belongings. Even then, be judicious with new purchases so you stay within your budget.

Depending oMoving Inn your new home’s size, you’ll probably spend more on electricity and gas bills each month. This is another reason to avoid buying new furniture and other accessories right away. When you’re adjusting to a new mortgage payment and higher energy costs, you’ll need to avoid unnecessary purchases for a while.

Adjust Slowly to Your Surroundings

Don’t expect to feel at home right away. It’s normal to feel some anxiety at first.

To combat these unsettled feelings, try to create as much of a normal routine as you can. Take your dogs for a walk to explore the neighborhood. Set up your kitchen in a similar pattern to your old kitchen-at least for a while. Have dinner at the same time as usual.

Remember, too, that you’ve already lived for a long time without those extra closets. There’s no need to fill them just because they exist. As time goes by, you’ll be open to creative ideas for them and other areas in your new home. Besides, not every space must be filled.

If all the open space starts to bother you, just remind yourself about how long it took to pack everything prior to the move. This thought should settle you while you slowly adjust to a bigger home.

If your budget allows for it, make yourself feel more at home by painting the spare bedroom a new color or switching out a bathroom fixture. These smaller, budget-friendly choices help you invest in each new space without automatically filling it with more belongings.

Before long, you’ll enjoy the extra space around you. In the meantime, keep all the best “small home” habits so you feel relaxed, not intimidated, in your larger home.

For more tips about preparing for your move-or adjusting to it after the big day-visit our Bekins blog again soon.

homeforsale

Selling Your Home Before You Move

When you move across the state, or even across the country, you can give your family countless opportunities for growth and exploration. But before you pack up your things and call your local moving company, you need to sell your old home-and fast!

Unfortunately, selling a home takes time. Sometimes houses can stay on the market for months, or even years. If you don’t prepare your home for resale, you may deter future buyers and prolong that time.

So what can you do to speed the process?

Improve the look and feel of your residence with the following suggestions.

Make a Great First ImpressionEntryway

First impressions make or break sales. When people pull up to your driveway, they need to feel welcome and comfortable.

To create a positive experience, inspect your home’s siding. If you notice peeling panels or grungy stains, apply a fresh coat of paint before the showing. Also, a good wash can work wonders for the look of your home. Power wash the exterior to remove stains, dirt, and other buildup.

Trim the Trees

The quality of your surrounding landscape affects the overall appearance of your home. Stray weeds and dead grass will age your home and decrease its value. So trim the hedges and trees, mow the lawn, and add some flowers for warmth and beauty.

Set the Mood with Lighting

Lighting sets a mood and makes the details of your home easier to see. Ensure that each light fixture works well, and put in some new bright bulbs. Also, open curtains and blinds to let in more natural light. A bright home feels more welcoming and open.

kitchen appliances

Photo via http://bit.ly/118yly3

Clean the Kitchen

Many homeowners spend a great deal of time in the kitchen, so they often come to this room first when inspecting your home’s interior. Even if your kitchen isn’t roomy or gadget-filled, you can still impress buyers by keeping it clean and functional.

Replace burners that don’t work, scrub grease and smears off the cabinets, and update any worn appliances.

Follow Your Nose

The smells in a home do much more than influence aesthetic appeal. Odors relate closely to health and sanitation. When your buyers take that first whiff of your home, you want it to smell fresh and clean.

If your home smells musty, air it out for a few hours before your buyers come to view it. Consider burning some scented candles or spraying some air freshener, too.

blog.builddirect.com

blog.builddirect.com

Add a Personal Touch

Your home should put your buyers at ease, and adding your personal touch can do just that. Although you may feel tempted to pack everything away and let your movers handle the storage, place a few strategic pieces of tasteful décor throughout your home to bring out its best features.

Avoid displaying family memorabilia and photos, as these will make it look as though you still plan to live in your current home.

You want your home to look classy but open to future changes in design. And you want to leave enough empty space for your buyers to imagine their own furniture designs and layouts.

Remember a Little Goes a Long Way

Walk through your home as if you were doing so for the first time. Contemplate what features are most desirable for a new home and decide what needs a little loving care. A few repairs and upgrades can transform your home from a fixer-upper to a keeper.

You may need to spend a little extra money to create these finishing touches, but the payoff will be worth it when your buyers eagerly sign those papers for their new home.

Potted plants

Moving your Plants to your new Home

If you garden at all-anything from a small succulent in your kitchen window to a full-blown vegetable garden in your backyard you put a lot of time, effort, and care into growing your plants. Because of the hard work you’ve put into them, it may be difficult to leave your plants behind.

Movers typically don’t transport plants because of state regulations and extreme temperature and lack of sunlight in the truck can be fatal. Double check with your local Bekins agents before you pack your plants. After you make sure the place you’re moving to has the right climate and soil for your plants, you can easily pack them up and move them yourself.

Here are a few different common plants and how to best move them.

Perennials/Grasses

First, trim down bigger, sturdier plants to about 6-12 inches. This makes them easier to

gardenguides.com

gardenguides.com

move, it encourages regrowth when you replant them, and it’s actually healthier for the plant. If you leave lots of stems, leaves, or flowers, it can stress out the plant because it’s trying to keep so much more of itself alive.

After trimming down the plants, dig them up-making sure to keep a lot of dirt around the roots-and put them in paper bags.

Make sure you’re using paper bags instead of plastic so the plants can still breathe. If you have to use plastic, poke some holes in it. The plants should be fine for a couple of weeks as long as they don’t get too hot or dry. Just make sure they’re in the shade during the move.

Potted Plants

The first thing to do is to make sure that you’re not moving your potted plants in nice ceramic pots-you don’t want those to break on the road. Move the plants to plastic pots a couple weeks before the move to give them a chance to get used to the new pots. Potted PlantA couple days before the move, water the plants; not too much, not too little. You don’t want them drying out, but you also don’t want them molding.

Next, put the plants in boxes and make sure they’re snug. You can stuff paper or bubble wrap around the pots to make sure they don’t get jostled around. If possible, keep the top of the boxes open to ensure they don’t get crushed by something else.

Also, don’t forget: plenty of your outdoor plants can move to pots. Things like herbs are commonly grown in pots. As long as you give them enough time to readjust to the pots before the move, they should be perfectly fine to travel.

Vegetables

You have two options here, and your choice depends on your space and resources. Your first option is to dig up the entire plant and replant it in a large bucket, such as a five gallon bucket used for food storage. These buckets should sit in your personal vehicle.

Tomato plantThe second option is to cut the plant and put the cutting in a floral tube, making sure it stays moist by covering it with wet paper towels. If you don’t have a floral tube, you can use a potato soaked in water. This method is easier and safer than trying to relocate an entire tomato plant.

When you get to your new home, replant the plants right away. The less time they spend in limbo, the better. Keep in mind that your perennials and vegetables might not look quite as large and beautiful as they did before the move, at least for a while. If they stayed dormant during the move, they can put their energy into root growth once they’re replanted.

If you use these tips to move your plants, next year they should be big and beautiful again-you just have to give them time to recover.

Baby Relocating

Moving with your Infant: 7 Ways to make it Safe & Easy

Have an infant but need to relocate?

Don’t worry. You can achieve a safe and easy move even with your small child in tow. From advanced planning to packing and basic moving tips, the following guide covers everything you need to complete your move with a happy, healthy, and cared-for baby.

Before the Move

Advanced planning is an absolute must when you have an infant. In addition to your regular moving to-dos, add these items to your list:

  1. Create a Meal Plan

Packing boxes and organizing transportation is no easy feat. You might struggle to find time to feed your baby, let alone time to feed yourself. So before your move, take the time to plan a few simple meals to keep up your energy levels. Stick with simple foods you can take on the go, like sandwiches and trail mix.

  1. Book a Babysitter

You and your significant other can take turns packing and watching the baby, but you’ll Moving with a baby 2definitely need help on moving day. You don’t want to worry about your child crawling under foot or crying unnoticed in the corner as you load boxes into the truck.

So hire a professional service, or ask a friend or family member help. Make sure your sitter knows the right date and time, and give plenty of advanced notice. If you worry your go-to sitter might not be available, ask a back-up babysitter to help, just in case.

  1. Find a Pediatrician

Your baby could get sick before, en route, or once you’ve arrived at your new place. To avoid a stressful situation, find a good pediatrician before your move. Ask around, read reviews, and visit your child’s new doctor.

Also, keep copies of your child’s medical records on hand, or mail them in advance to the pediatrician. This way you can keep your child up-to-date on his or her immunizations despite the move.

During the Move

Now that you’ve planned your entire move, it’s time to prepare you and your baby for the official moving day.

  1. Put Together aMoving In Travel Case of Baby Essentials

Think everything you use to care for your baby day and a night. Since moving services may deliver your items before or after you arrive, you’ll want to keep certain essentials with you. This could include:

  • Diapers and wipes
  • Diaper rash ointment
  • Changing pad
  • Changes of clothes
  • Toys and snacks
  • Plenty of baby food
  • First-aid kit
  • Plastic bags for trash
  • Stroller
  • Portable crib
  • One or two blankets
  • Sunscreen

Although packing these items can sometimes seem look more hassle than its worth, you’ll be happy you have them during an emergency.

  1. Take Extra Time En Route

If you are traveling to your new home via road trip or plane, realize that it will take extra time when you have an infant. Plan for frequent stops along the way for feeding, bathroom, or just to take a break.

Bring a noisemaker or recorded sounds that soothe your baby during the trip.

After the Move

Congratulations! You made it through the journey to your new hoSmallerme. But you’re not finished yet.

  1. Enjoy Your First Meal in Your New Home

Upon arrival, plan for an easy takeout meal on the kitchen floor. You can turn this into a fun picnic by spreading a blanket out and taking your meal together with some paper napkins.

  1. Catch Up on Your Sleep

After you’ve eaten and fed your infant, take a few minutes to unpack your basic essentials. This could include a few blankets to sleep on, or finding your toothbrush in your toiletries bag. From there, do what’s necessary to settle in and enjoy your first night in your new home.

If you can, try to remain consistent with your infant’s sleep schedule. Soon you and your family will adjust to your new home and new routine.

Temporary Relocation

Simplifying Your Temporary Move

Whether you’re moving to graduate school or teaching abroad, temporary moves can be tricky. You don’t want to bring your childhood stuffed animal or large antique dresser, but you just can’t throw them away, either. What should you do?

If you’re preparing to embark on an adventure without all your belongings, use our tips below. We’ll help you navigate your journey and make the most of the process.

Step 1: Get Organized to Simplify Packing

Packing for any type of move is stressful, so pack in an organized fashion to make your temporary move much smoother. First, find or buy more moving boxes than you think you’ll need. That way you won’t have to stop halfway through packing if you run out. Next, tape up your boxes and label each box as one of three things:

  • Take
  • Store
  • Throw Awaya box full of clothes to be donated.

Go through your rooms one at a time and sort everything into boxes labeled as one of these three categories. When you fill a box, put it in a designated corner in your living room and start a new one. Don’t leave the room you’re packing until everything is boxed up. Pretty soon your living room will have three different corners filled with organized boxes.

When you’re packing this way, it’s important to be ruthless. All those old college textbooks you’ve been carrying around need to get tossed for good. Plan to pack less than you can technically bring with you in your Take boxes, and you’ll probably pack exactly what you need.

Step 2: Find a Temporary Tenant

If you plan to move back into the house or condo you own, secure a temporary tenant for the time you’ll be gone. It might be a risk to arrange a month-to-month lease since your tenant can technically terminate at any time, but you won’t be homeless if you decide to come back earlier than planned.

You can also hire a property management company to manage any landlord duties while you’re away. They’ll collect rent and handle rental-agreementcomplaints and maintenance tickets for you.

Step 3: Find Temporary Housing in Your New Area

Long-term housing is often easier to find than temporary housing. As a result, when you’re looking for temporary housing in your new city, state, or country, you might have to think outside the box. Can you find a room to rent through websites like Air BNB? Is anyone from your program moving with you? See if you can move in together to cut costs.

If your stay is quite short, you can always book a room in a long-term hotel.

Step 4: Forward Your Mail

The US Post Office makes mail forwarding simple-you just need to fill out their online form. The process costs a dollar or slightly more, so have your credit card handy.

You can forward your mail in 6-month increments. Just remember to revisit the website and extend your mail forwarding after 6 months if you’re staying longer than that.

Step 5: Store Your Belongings

This should be your final step before you fly out. Be sure to label all boxes by room so they’re easier to unpack when you return.

To stay organized and make the process easier, hire a moving company. Plus, some moving companies offer storage units along with their moving services. You can simplify your move Economy Moversby hiring one company to take care of both tasks.

If you live alone in an apartment, you’ll only need a 10 x 10 unit. If you have a family or a house full furniture, plan to rent a unit that’s at least 10 x 20. If you’re leaving your car, you can park it in the unit, too.

If you follow these tips, your temporary move will be much less stressful. Call a moving company to get started on your new adventure.

Attractive young adult couple lying on home floor with coffee cups smiling and looking at blueprints.

The Hidden Costs of Moving

So you have taken the plunge and decided to move. This is a big step, and one worthy of congratulation. But with this exciting step forward comes a lot of costs-some expected, some unexpected.

No matter what your housing situation, planning a move turns out to be an expensive endeavor. By this point, you have looked carefully at mortgage rates, rent costs, moving company deposits and so forth. But what you may not have considered are some of the smaller costs of moving.

Whether you are up sizing, downsizing, or just moving locations, these hidden costs can overwhelm your budget if you are not careful. As you budget your move, remember to keep the following hidden costs in mind.

Packing Supplies

Whether you are packing things up yourself or plan on hiring a professional moving Moving Incompany do the work, you will need boxes, bins, tape, bubble wrap, and markers. Some packing services take care of the supplies and include the cost in the final fee. Others don’t charge for labor and supplies, but may charge fees for extra packing boxes needed for added safety during the move. Either way, make sure you account for this cost.

Storing Possessions

Sometimes moves have unexpected delays. Closing on a house might take longer than anticipated, or previous tenants might not vacate the property on time. In such situations, the best solution is often to store your possessions until you are able to move in.

Prices for storage units vary, depending on size, climate control, and security measures. Though hopefully your move will go off without any delays, budget for storage for a few weeks in case you need to accommodate delays.

Managing Utility Accounts

Closing old utility accounts (including power, gas, phone, and internet) sometimes entails unforeseen fees. You will receive initial deposits from such accounts, thankfully. But often late fees or premature closing fees may make that deposit smaller than you had hoped.

Once settled in your new home, you will need to open new accounts. Opening new utility accounts often means paying deposits, set-up fees, etc.

You can prepare for both kinds of fees by calling utility companies weeks before the move. This will ensure that your accounts are square before the actual moving date.

Sleeping and Eating During the Move

Depending on how far you are moving and how you plan to get there, the actual move might include several days of travel.

As you plan, budget for transportation (gas, airplane tickets, bus tickets, parking fees, etc.). Also consider accommodations: will you be staying in a hotel in the days between moving out of your old home and into your new home? Account for food as well. If your move will take several days, you may be eating out until you have a kitchen again.

Getting SettledChecklist

Driver’s license fees, plate registration, opening or closing bank accounts or gym contracts: these all have hidden costs. When making a move across state lines especially, you will need to update many of these day-to-day contracts. You will have time once established in your new home to take care of such items, but prepare your budget for these updates as well.

Replacing Odds and Ends

If you are making a big move, you might be leaving behind (or throwing away) everyday items. For instance, cleaning supplies, baking goods, and other small fixtures you have accumulated might get left in your old house. Some items might also get lost or damaged in the move. Choose a reliable moving company to avoid this as much as possible, but anticipate replacing some odds and ends.

The best secret to reducing the budget-related stress of moving is to prepare. You may encounter unexpected situations as you relocate. By keeping these hidden costs in mind, though, such unexpected situations won’t surprise you.

For more moving advice, explore some of Bekins’ other blog posts.

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What is a delivery spread?

When a sales consultant comes to your home to complete an in-home estimate, they will explain a variety of information. One such topic is your delivery spread. But, what exactly is a delivery spread?

Your sales consultant will give you a set of dates that typically range of 1-14 days for your household goods to arrive at your new home. When you sign the Bill of Lading, you agree to the dates in the window and are expected to accept the delivery within those days. The driver will call you 24-48 hours to let you know the planned date of your delivery. Meanwhile, Bekins will do their best to keep you updated on the delivery date.  A moving agent greeting a customer.

What causes the shipment to take between 1-14 days to be delivered to your new home? There are a variety of factors that goes into determining a delivery spread. The three biggest factors are:

  • The distance between your origin and destination
  • The time of year
  • The weight of your shipment

The farther the distance of the move typically means the wider the spread. Larger shipments are easier to predict days vs. smaller shipments. Smaller shipments allow for more loads on the truck, so a driver may have four or five other families that he has to deliver to or pick up in their shipment spread. For example: If you are moving from New York to Florida, the truck with belongings may be stopping in Richmond, Va. and Atlanta, Ga. before arriving in Florida with your items.

customer-service-billboardIt is a good idea to remain flexible during the delivery spread dates so you are free to accept the delivery on any of those days.  If there are any days in the delivery spread that you will be unavailable to meet the driver, always make a backup plan at the time of booking for someone else to meet the driver on those days, however this is not recommended.

In the rare circumstance your belongings will not be delivered within the delivery spread, Bekins will do what it can to accommodate you and your family. Our Customer Service department will be able to provide you with updates as they occur. If you have any questions about your shipment, please call 1-800-992-5202.

 

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Tips to Safely Move Any Kind of Musical Instrument

You know that your couch, your dining room set, your clothes, and your books will all arrive safely at your new home. These items will stay solidly in place in the moving van, and they’ll show up at your front door intact. You don’t have to worry about them.

However, you probably don’t feel the same way about your musical instruments. These complex and somewhat fragile items could easily sustain damage during a trip across the country, even if the truck operator drives carefully. Instruments cost a lot of money, and they allow you to express your emotions through the language of music. If anything happened to yours, you would probably feel devastated.

Luckily, you can take steps to safeguard your instruments while they travel. Read the guide below to find out how.

Pianos and Organs

Most moving companies train their employees to safely move these instruments.piano You don’t have to worry about their wellbeing during the moving process. You can, however, take steps to prepare them for the move:

  • Close and lock the keyboard lid, if possible.
  • Remove any removable parts, like the music stand.
  • Provide blankets, towels, and lots of bubble wrap for wrapping the instrument. Secure all wrapping materials with packing tape or duct tape.
  • Put additional wrapping on the legs and pedals.

You can usually trust your movers to do all of the above. But if you want to supervise the process yourself, just follow those steps.

Violins, Cellos, and Other Stringed Instruments

Stringed instruments have more fragility than other instruments, which makes them tricky to ship. You don’t want fingerboards, bows, or sound-boxes to crack, but even something as simple as a speed bump could cause that kind of damage. Adverse weather conditions could also warp the wood.

To prevent cracking or warping, take the following steps:

http://thinkeryaustin.org/blog/science-woodwinds/

http://thinkeryaustin.org/blog/science-woodwinds/

  • Loosen the instrument’s strings a little bit. Don’t loosen them so much that the bridge falls over—just loosen them enough that the temperature won’t strain them. Cold temperatures will tighten them, while warmer temperatures will loosen them. Leave them loose so these changes won’t pull your strings so tight they snap the fingerboard or headstock.
  • Where applicable, loosen the bow’s hairs for the same reasons.
  • Where applicable, turn all the tuning keys parallel with the headstock so nothing can snap them off.
  • Add some extra padding. Bubble wrap makes for an excellent solution, but you can also use crumpled paper. Wrap your instrument and your bow in these items before placing them on the case. Do not use shredded paper or packing peanuts because these items could get inside your instrument. You’ll have a really hard time getting that back out.
  • If you don’t have a hard case, purchase one. Your instrument will stay safe from moisture and falls this way.

Once you’ve taken all these steps, very little could keep your stringed instrument from arriving at your new home intact.

Trumpets, Clarinets, and Other Brass or Woodwind Instruments

http://thinkeryaustin.org/blog/science-woodwinds/

http://thinkeryaustin.org/blog/science-woodwinds/

Luckily, most brass and woodwind instruments have fairly robust parts. However, a ding or dent in even one part could ruin the entire sound. Keep your brass or woodwind safe by doing the following:

  • Completely take the instrument apart.
  • Wrap all the pieces in bubble wrap.
  • Store them in a hard case. If you do not have one, purchase one. If you can’t purchase one, wrap the pieces in several layers of bubble wrap and towels. You don’t want the pieces to bump into each other or anything else.

These steps may seem simple, but they will help your instrument survive the trip unscathed.

Drum Sets and Other Percussion Instruments

Your drums only need simple protection as well. Simply buy a box a couple inches larger than the drum, then pad the sides, top, and bottom with bubble wrap. If you have larger percussion instruments, like a marimba, depend on your movers to relocate it the same way they move a piano. It will arrive safely.

Use these tips to keep your beloved instrument secure and intact as you move to your new home. Check out the rest of our blog for additional moving tips.