Category Archives: Moving Tips

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Don’t Chip the Glasses or Crack the Plates: How to Pack Your Kitchenware

Few things are more stressful during a move than packing the items in your kitchen. Delicate stemware, bulky pots and pans and an over abundance of Tupperware are difficult to box up without breaking a few plates along the way.

So what can you do to keep your kitchen ware safe before your next adventure? These tips and tricks will start you on the right track.

Protect Your Glasses
glass pack sm Cups, goblets, stemware and sundae glasses have awkward shapes and are easy to break, especially if they’re made of glass or fine crystal. To keep your glasses from chipping, use a divided box designed for shipping wine and liquor bottles. If you can’t find a divided box, carefully line a small box with bubble-wrap to protect your glasses.

Once you’ve found the right box, grab your largest and widest cup and lightly line the outside and inside with newspaper or packing paper. This reinforces the glass sides.

Repeat the lining process with your second cup, and then place it inside the first cup. Continue placing each glass inside the ones before it until you can’t insert anymore (you’ll likely fit three or four glasses in each group before running out of room).

Place these glasses in their separate cells, and when the box is full, cushion the top with tissue paper and use bubble-wrap to fill in the gaps. Seal the box and mark it as “fragile.”

Pack Your Plates
As with cups and glasses, you can find cardboard boxes specifically for packing plates. These boxes, also known as dish packs, are stronger and thicker than the average cardboard box. This enables them to absorb shock and protect your dishes. Your local agent can provide dish packs at a competitive price.

When you’re ready, put a plate on a sheet of newspaper. Place a thin sheet of bubble-wrap on the top of the plate. The bubble- wrap should be just big enough to cover the surface of the plate.

Place the next plate on top, with another sheet of bubble-wrap. Repeat the process until you have three stacked plates, then use the newspaper to wrap the entire set. Seal the package with tape; then stack the wrapped plates on their side in the box(rather than stacking them flat).

Continue placing plates in the box until you fill it. Use packing peanuts and crumpled paper to fill in any gaps. As with the cups, you’ll want to mark this box as “fragile.”

Manage Pots and Pans
Pots and pans are sturdier than glassware, so you can use a generic large box to pack these items. Line the box with styrofoam packing peanuts, and moving-boxes-mediumyou’ll be ready to pack.

With pots and pans, you’ll want to use the same technique you used with your cups. Start with your largest pan (without its lid), and line it with newspaper or bubble-wrap. Then, nestle your smaller pan inside. When you’ve nested three pans together, use newsprint and packing paper to wrap the three together.

Place the bunch in the bottom of the box and fill in the gaps with newspaper. If you have lids for your pans, wrap them individually and place them in the sides of the box. Mark the box as “Kitchenware” or “Pans” to help you stay organized.

Don’t Forget the Silverware
Because silverware and utensils are sturdy, you maybe tempted to toss them last minute in the bottom of another kitchen box. However, forks and knives have pointy, sharp edges that could injure you or your movers if handled incorrectly.

To prevent injury, roll forks and knives in tissue paper first before packing them away into a box. If your utensils are genuine silverware, do not wrap them in newsprint – this tarnishes your silverware.

If your knives are part of a chopping block, use tape on all sides of the block to hold the knives in. Cover the entire block with packing paper, and mark the package as “knives” so you remember to handle them with care.

What to Do With Tupperware
Tupperware and other food storage containers stack easily and resist damage. Unlike other dishes, they don’t need a bubble-wrap lining because they are plastic.

If you’ve acquired an extensive amount of Tupperware and similar containers over the years, they can add to the clutter of your move. To simplify the process, sort through and discard any items that you won’t need. Make sure each container has its own lid, and throw away any containers that are extensively stained or worn.

Once you’ve decided what to keep, stack your containers in the same way you’d stack your cups: nest each small container in a large container (without their lids). Put the stacked Tupperware in the box, and then place their corresponding lids along the sides of the box.

Of course, this is a lot of work. If this isn’t for you and you would like to have someone else do it for you, Bekins offers various packing services for your moving needs.

Need Additional Advice? These tips and tricks will help you pack your kitchenware safely. For more household moving tips and tricks, don’t be afraid to ask your local Bekins agent for advice.

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Don’t Lift That: Items to Leave to the Household Movers

Still debating about whether to hire a professional to move your household goods? Even if you feel comfortable moving boxes and furniture yourself, some objects are harder to manage. By lifting these items without proper training or tools, you not only risk physical strain but also irreversible damage to an expensive item. It’s better to call in a team of professional movers to lift the following items:

Piano Whether you own an upright or a grand piano, you should hire a moving company to get your instrument in and out of the house. Pianos have an irregular shape and hundreds of working parts. To keep your piano functional and elegant, find a mover specialized in handling these circumstances.

Pool Table Moving a pool table definitely isn’t fun and games. Depending on the model you own, your pool table could weigh between 500 to 1,000 pounds. As you search for a moving company, ask whether the movers will transport pool tables and what their process is for doing so. Many movers will disassemble your table first to prevent damage.

Hot Tub You may have moved your hot tub around the backyard, but moving it to a new home is a different story. Ask your moving company what steps to take beforehand. You’ll likely need to drain the hot tub and remove the equipment pack. Then leave the rest to the professionals.

Fragile Non-valuables We recommend keeping your most iDSCF3289rreplaceable valuables with you. That includes jewelry, special collections, and family heirlooms. Even though movers use the utmost care, you don’t want to risk damaging those items. However, an expert, with years of experience, can better protect your mirrors, china, glassware, artwork, and other delicate items with special packaging. While you may want to oversee the handling of these precious items, leaving the packing and moving of them to the professionals is the safest way to go.

Remember, above all else, that moving isn’t a job you have to undertake alone. Hire a professional mover. Enlist friends and special equipment. Whatever your plan, know you can ease the burden of heavy objects-and the stresses of moving-with a little help.

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Frequently Asked Questions about Packing

Once you have hired a moving service, you will have to decide whether to purchase additional services, and one of those services is packing. Packing is a tedious task that can be done for you, or you can do it yourself. Regardless of what you choose, here is the compiled a list of frequently asked questions when it comes to packing.

What packing services does Bekins offer?

Bekins offers a variety of packing services:

  •  Full-service packing, crating and unpacking
  •  Packing only difficult and/or fragile items
  •  Special packing for sensitive home electronics
  • Advice and quality packing materials

Of course, you can pack you own belonging and Bekins agent can offer suggestions and a full line of packing materials at competitive rates.

All Bekins movers are trained to handle your belongings with the utmost care and attention. To obtain packing materials including boxes, your local Bekins agent can provide these at competitive rates.

Can I leave the items in my dresser drawers?
Yes, you can leave clothing in your dresser drawers if your shipment will not need storage. If you will need storage at one of Bekins’ agencies, we recommend that all items in your dresser drawers be packed. We also recommend that all non-clothing items be packed, regardless of your storage needs.

Will the mover load the boxes that I packed?
Yes, the driver will load the boxes that you packed as long as the driver deems them safe for transport. Please note, the liability coverage for boxes that you pack yourself is not the same as the liability coverage available to you for carrier-packed boxes.

Can I pack and move my plants?
Typically, it is not advisable to move your plants. Most professional movers will only accept plants if the shipment is not going more than 150 miles and/or delivery will be within 24 hours. In addition, if you are moving across state lines, check with federal and state regulations for quarantines or other restrictions. Several states even require that plants be inspected and declared “pest free.”

What items cannot be packed?
Bekins wants your belongings to arrive at your new home safe and sound.

That means not moving certain items. Aerosol cans and hazardous materials are unsafe for transportation on a moving van. In addition, perishable items and those of personal importance are recommended for your individual transport. Read our comprehensive list of What Not to Pack.

How should I move my jewelry aDSCF3144nd other valuable items?
Bekins recommends you do not pack or ship your fine jewelry, precious metals, important papers (titles, tax forms, bank books, deeds, etc.), medical and dental records, prescriptions, coins, currency, stock certificates, notes or bonds. These items should be carried with you during your move.

How should I prepare my appliances?
All major appliances (washer, dryer, refrigerator, freezer, stoves, etc.) should be properly disconnected before the mover’s arrival. An authorized service firm can disconnect and prepare each appliance for transport. All refrigerators and freezers should be defrosted, cleaned and dried before the movers arrive. For more information, visit our how to move appliances page.

Will Bekins move my automobile?
Yes, Bekins has the capability to transport your automobile. There are several options for this service, including in-van service or use of a third-party carrier. If you elect to use in-van service, your automobile will be transported on a Bekins moving truck with your household goods. You can also elect to use a third-party carrier to transport your vehicle. Whichever option you choose, your local Bekins agent can arrange this service for you.

How will my mirrors and pictures be protected and packed?
Your local Bekins agent can pack all of your mirrors and pictures using specially designed cartons and wrapping materials to provide maximum protection for your goods.

What type of protection options do my belongings have during transport?
Bekins offers different levels of valuation options for your belongings. These options are not insurance, but provide for protection of your goods during shipping. Learn more about Bekins Valuation options.

More packing resources:

Bekins Packing Guide

Bekins Moving Checklist

Bekins Printable Labels

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Frequently Asked Questions when Preparing to Hire a Moving Company

Relocating your household goods is an extensive and complicated process, which can raise a lot of questions. We have compiled a list of frequently asked questions when choosing a moving service.

What is an interstate move?
Interstate moving is defined as those moves that cross state lines to get from their origin to their destination.

What is an agent?
An agent is a local moving company that books long distance moves through its van line. An agent usually performs local moves, intrastate moves, packing, storage and perhaps other services. Bekins Van Lines offers a network of 370 agents all over the United States.

What is the difference between a moving broker and a moving carrier?
Moving brokers are often described as a middle person between the customer and the moving company. A moving broker does not have the operational and logistic capabilities that moving companies have. Moving brokers are sales teams that book your move and sell it to an actual moving company. The broker provides a customer the opportunity to have access to many competitive moving quotes, however, despite there being reputable brokers, there are also rogue brokers who have left customers in bad situations.

A moving carrier, such as Bekins Van Lines, has operational and logistical capabilities, such as truck fleets and warehouses. We employ highly trained moving professionals and are licensed, insured, accredited by major business, transportation and regulatory organizations. Moving carriers are also responsible for lost or damaged goods and work very hard to prevent mistakes.

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When is the best time to move?
Whenever is the right time for you. However, the months of May-September have the highest demand in the moving industry. During the non-peak season September 15-May 1, Bekins has a special offer for customers moving during those months.

When should I begin researching and contacting companies about upcoming moves?
We suggest to start researching moving companies around eight weeks before you move. Many moving companies offer online options to receive a ballpark estimate, which would give you an idea if a moving company is in your price range. Once your narrow your search down to three companies, then request an in home estimate for the most accurate price. Then choose the right moving company from there about four weeks before your scheduled move.

What is an in-home estimate?
A local Bekins agent will come to your home and complete a visual survey of your belongings that you are planning on moving. The estimate is based on a wide variety of factors, the two main ones being shipment weight and distance to destination. In addition, the agent will evaluate the need for professional services, such as pack and unpacking, appliance preparation and custom crating and storage. Make sure all the items that you are planning on moving are in plain view, including items from the attic, garage and basement. If there are any household items are not making the move, make sure to point those out as well.

Along with providing a written estimate, your local Bekins agents will be able to explain the different types of estimates, your rights and responsibilities and valuation options.

What is a non-binding estimate?
A non-binding estimate is the carrier’s approximation of the cost, based on the estimated weight of the shipment and the accessorial services requested. The final cost will be based upon the actual weight of your shipment, the services provided and the tariff provisions in effect. To verify the weight of your shipment, the driver will weigh his trailer prior to loading your shipment and then reweigh his trailer once your shipment has been loaded.

DSCF0239What is an Order for Service?
An Order for Service is a signed written agreement made in advance with the moving company, authorizing the company to move your goods.

What is a Bill of Lading?
A Bill of Lading is the written contract between you and the mover which lists the terms of the agreement (services, dates and actual charges, etc.). The Bill of Lading also serves as your receipt for your belongings.

What is an inventory?
The inventory is the form that lists all of the items that you are moving and their condition. Both you and the driver will sign the inventory after the shipment is loaded and unloaded. The inventory is also used to document any change in the condition of your items or any missing items at delivery.

What are my rights and responsibilities when I move?
All moving companies are required by federal law to provide each customer a copy of Your Rights and Responsibilities When You Move. Your primary responsibility as outlined by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) is to select a reputable household goods carrier, ensure that you understand the terms and conditions of the contract, and understand and pursue the remedies that are available to you in case problems arise. You should talk to your mover if you have further questions. The moving company will also furnish you with additional written information describing its procedure for handling your questions and complaints, and a telephone number you can call to obtain additional information about your move.

What is Valuation?
Bekins goal is to delivery your household goods to your home in a safe and timely manner. Although Bekins takes every measure to assure that your items arrive at your new home without incident, sometimes damage occurs. To be sure that your goods are protected, we offer various levels of transit protection from full value protection to basic liability. Learn more about your valuation options and the different levels of transit protection.

What are the methods of payment Bekins accepts for my move?
Tariff provisions require the move is to be paid in full before the shipment is being unloaded at the destination. You can pay for the move at the time of delivery with cash, money order, traveler’s check, certified check or cashier’s check. With prior credit approval, there is an option to charge the cost of your move to a personal credit. Bekins accepts major credit cards: MasterCard, Visa, Discover and American Express.

What questions do you have about your upcoming move? Ask below and we will answer!

 

goodhousekeeping.com

Kitchen Decluttering: How to Spend Less than an Hour Tidying Up

Any family that has recently relocated or moved into a new home, knows the importance of time saving organization and cleaning tips. Dividing your home (and each room) into zones that make it easy to spend less than an hour a day tidying your spaces. Lets start with the busiest room in the house-your kitchen.

Ideally, once you’ve set up your routine, it will take you less and less time each day. However, if you’ve not been as diligent as you need to be in your kitchen, the first time around may take you a little longer. That’s okay. The important thing is just to start.

Preliminaries

Before working in each zone, take heed to a few preliminary tips. According to www.flylady.net, you should carry a timer with you before you start cleaning. Also have on hand three baskets or boxes labeled as “throw away,” “give away,” or “put away.”

The FlyLady also suggests working in clockwise order in any room. This helps you focus on one area at a time.

Here, then, are a few strategies for getting the clutter under control in your kitchen, zone by zone. If it makes sense to re-order your zones according to the clockwise pattern mentioned above, do it.

Zone 1: Cabinets

Set your timer for 15 minutes, and have your boxes nearby. Open each cupboard door one by one. If a family member has put a kitchen or food item in the wrong cupboard, take it out and put it in your “put away” box. Don’t actually put it in the correct location yet! Just stick it in the

goodhousekeeping.com

goodhousekeeping.com

box.

Next, take out any food items that are over six months old (pay attention to expiration dates) and put them in your “throw away” box.

Give your cabinet doors a quick wipe down. Stop when your timer goes off, even if you haven’t finished. You can do the rest of the cabinets another day, starting where you left off. This helps keep you from burning out on your tasks.

Zone 2: Under the Sink

Set the timer for 5 minutes. That should be enough time if you’re doing maintenance; if this is the first attempt, it will take you longer. Just try to work for 5 minutes and see how much you can do.

Throw away old cleansers and rags. If you have few items under the sink, take them out and wipe down or sweep the cupboard floor. Then wipe down both sides of doors with a damp cloth and return all items.

To streamline future organization, look into stacking baskets or adjustable-height shelving-you can get even more organized space this way.

Zone 3: Hanging Storage Areas

Set your timer for 5 minutes and have a wet cloth and duster handy. You’re going to tackle the overhanging pots rack, if you have one, plus any areas where you have dishcloths or towels hanging off the stove or fridge. Quickly scan all the areas where you have hanging items, then you’ll be more efficient.

Remove and quickly wipe down each item to remove dust or grease, then replace. Throw dirty towels or dishrags in your “put away” box; those will go to the laundry room later.

Zone 4: Drawers

Set your timer for 10 minutes. Keep a cordless vacuum and damp cloth/dusting cloth handy as you go along.

Working in a clockwise fashion, wipe down drawer fronts and pulls, then remove items that may be in the wrong location (just as you did for your cupboards). Put these items in the appropriate box and move along quickly. Don’t be tempted to dawdle over a given drawer; just take out what doesn’t belong, throw away trash or junk, and take care of anything you want to donate.

If you see lots of crumbs or dirt, use a small cleaning brush attachment on your small vacuum to get rid of the dirt. If it’s not problematic, though, save the deep cleaning for another day. Just move along quickly.

Zone 5: Work Surfaces & Countertops

Set your timer for 5 minutes (if you get really good at this, it will take you probably 2 minutes). With a damp cloth, quickly wipe down spills, dust, or grease on your counter-tops and back-splash areas. Replace counter-top items as you go rather than taking them off the surface first. This will save time.

If you notice misplaced items as you go, put them in the appropriate box.

Zone 6: Refrigerator & Freezer

Set your timer for 5 minutes. This is not a deep-clean; you’ll have to set aside an additional 30-60 minutes for that task another day. Right now you’re simply getting rid of clutter and doing a quick wipe down.

Begin by throwing out all spoiled food (in both the refrigerator and freezer)-just put it in your regular garbage can or your “throw away” box.

Wipe down top, sides, and doors, then gently wipe the door seals, as they tend to collect dust, crumbs, food spills, and grease over time.  That’s it-you’re done!

goodhousekeeping.com

goodhousekeeping.com

Zone 7: Pantry

If your cupboards basically are your pantry, you can skip this step. If you have a separate pantry, set your timer for 10 minutes.

Follow the suggestions listed for zone 1!

Zone 8: Kitchen Table

You don’t even need to set your timer for this one; just wipe down your table with a damp cloth, removing and replacing items as you go. If you have a wood table, you can use a dusting spray now and then to maintain the wood finish.

Enlist the help of family members to take care of the “put away” box. Once that’s done, congratulate yourself on a job quickly done, then go put your feet up and relax.

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Don’t Miss a Detail: Tips for International Relocation

Despite the playful title, where your money goes and what paperwork you need to fill out is the single biggest obstacle to conquer. If you already have a position lined up, you are likely aware of embassy registration in your new country. You likely have a sponsored visa for you and your family members as well. Some less-obvious things to consider are your current debts, mortgages, loans, and credit cards.

Talk to your lenders immediately to determine what you should pay off before you leave, what can be frozen, and what you can continue to pay off while you are in your new country. Are your credit cards valid in your new country? What are the exchange and interest rates?

The other large, potentially challenging obstacles to overcome are health and safety concerns.

Check the Center for Disease Control’s Travelers’ Health Menu for an idea of what immunizations you’ll need and what you could be exposed to in your new country. Binge on doctor visits before you go, getting any surgeries, dental work, or eye wear before you go. While it may add a bit more stress to your relocation-focused mind, it will prevent a medical emergency in a new country.

Another critical question to ask is whether or not your current health insurance will still be available to you. If your new employer offers you insurance or your new, foreign country has socialized medicine, determine the lapse between the end of your current coverage and the beginning of your new coverage.

The U.S. Department of State has a Smart Traveler Enrollment Program, which may be worthwhile for you to explore. It has pertinent information about the risks Americans face when they travel or move to a new country.

Deal with Your Stuff Second: Organizational Tactics and Hard Decisions

Decide what to bring, and then weigh it.

Ask your moving company when your items will arrive in the new city and pack in your luggage all the things you’ll need until the rest of your items arrive. Once you think you have the least items you can survive with, weigh the luggage to see if it’ll pass as a carry-on, checked baggage, or oversized luggage.

Be ruthlessly minimalist about what you want to bring to your new country.

Reassess, and then purge.

Sell extra items on eBay or Craig’s List, or hold a garage sale. Donate whatever else you can’t seem to sell. Set a deadline for your for-sale items, and if they are still at your house, donate them, too.

Take an inventory.

Once you feel good about the items you are going to bring with you, create a list to track them. You might feel like you have it under control, until the day comes when you are looking for your cell phone charger, your child’s favorite stuffed animal, or your comfortable house slippers. Whoops. Avoid this in advance by reviewing your stock and tallying each item.

Organize things into categories.

Separate your family’s items into categories, and then make an inventory list. Pack category items together in order to maintain organization for the unpacking process.

Think About Your Loved Ones: Relocating with Children and Pets

Children often have difficulty adjusting to an international move. Throwing them a goodbye party and encouraging them to stay in contact with friends via social media and email are excellent ways to ease the transition.

Look for schools that offer an International Baccalaureate program because they offer a standardized, transnational curriculum. The options for international schools may be limited in certain countries; if this is the case, a local school might be a better option for your children, especially if you are moving permanently. International Schools Services offers a worldwide list of English-speaking schools.

Now, another big decision-what about your pets?

To bring or not to bring, that is the real question. It’s hard to imagine life without your furry friends, but life for them can be substantially harder in a foreign city.

Look at where you are going to be living. Is there a yard? Is there a dog park nearby? Where can you take your dog for a walk? Will you be working long hours without the ability to come home at lunch? If you think your pet will suffer more with you abroad than it will in a new home, then it is time to think about adoption.

If you choose to bring your pet, every country has pet importation forms and veterinary clearance standards. Your pet likely will need immunizations and a clean bill of health from your vet.

If you do decide to bring your pet, complete the paperwork, certifications, and immunizations, then purchase a hard carrier case and spill-proof water container. Your vet can provide your pet with sedatives.

Taking your pet to a foreign country involves a difficult airplane ride. Ask your airline for information about when you can travel with your pet because there are black-out dates. How much is the surcharge for bringing Fido? Which pet friendly airports can you travel through? Will your pet be stored in-cabin or under-cabin?

On the day of the flight, arrive three hours early for security purposes. Between flights, confirm your pet has been boarded on the next flight during a layover.

Pack your pet’s go-to food brand, and after arriving, compare it to the current country’s food ingredients. Slowly mix in new kibble one quarter at a time until your pet gets used to the new food. Talk to neighbors about places to walk your dog.

These tips will help you ease into your new city. Remember that you don’t need to do this alone. An international professional moving service can circumvent most of the packing, shipping, and unpacking issues involved with international relocation.

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Color Your Move Green

Making your move environmentally friendly is easy! Here are a few guidelines to color your move green!

Sell or Give Away non-essential items:

Moving is a great way to get rid of things that are no longer needed, which will in turn reduce the cost of your move!

  • Yard Sales, CraigsList, Ebay are great resources to sell your items that you no longer need.
  • Donating items to charities, which are tax deductible and are helping others in need.
  • Books can be donated to local libraries, and most schools will be happy to make use of old computers.
  • Donate your excess food to local food pantries or to Move For Hunger.
  • Cut down on junk mail at your new address by filing a temporary change of address with your post office rather than a permanent one.

Use recyclable and reusable packing materials:

  • Your local Bekins agent can provide you with gently used cartons for a reduced fee, or no charge.
  • Use towels, sheets and blankets to wrap breakable items rather than bubble wrap, peanuts or packing paper.
  • If you do need to use peanuts, use cornstarch peanuts because they are biodegradable.
  • If you have room in your basement, garage or attic, keep some boxes for your next move or use them for storage of holiday décor and out of season clothing and shoes.
  • Use recyclable packing paper.
  • If you don’t want to keep your boxes take them to your local recycling center.

Use Eco Friendly Cleaning Supplies

  • Look for products that are non-toxic, biodegradable, and made from renewable resources (not petroleum).
  • Since cleaning supplies are not permitted for a move, you can make your own cleaning products with some vinegar, baking soda and warm water.

Natural cleaners. Vinegar, baking soda, salt and lemon.

Staying Green Post Move

  • Set up a recycling station in your kitchen or garage.
  • Upgrade your insulation – this can improve your home’s energy draw by 20-30 percent.
  • When buying new appliances, consider buying Energy Star-qualified.
  • Buy a new houseplant to improve air quality in your home.
  • Filter your tap water to avoid buying water bottles.
  • Pay your bills electronically, usually there are discounts and perks when you do this.
  • Reduce use of bug sprays and pesticides.
  • Unplug phone and computer chargers when not in use.
  • Use compact fluorescent, LED or halogen light bulbs.
  • Adjust your heat/air conditioning when no one is home.

 

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This is Moving – Terminology

The moving world has its own lingo and when preparing for a move it is important to understand the terminology.  Below are common words that you may come across in the moving process:

Accessorial (additional) services – Services, such as packing, appliance servicing, unpacking or stair carries, that you request to be performed (or are necessary because of landlord requirements or other special circumstances). Charges for these services are in addition to the transportation charges. Learn more about Bekins Additional Service.

Advanced charges – Charges for services performed by someone other than the movers. A professional, craftsman or other third party may perform these services at your request. The mover pays for these services and adds the charges to your Bill of Lading charges.

Agent – A local moving company authorized to act on behalf of a national van line. The agent may handle the booking, origin, hauling and/or destination services. Find your Local Agent

Agreed delivery date – The agreed delivery date can range from one day to several depending on the weight of your shipment. Your salesperson will discuss the transit times with you prior to registering your shipment with Bekins Traffic Department.

Agreed pick-up date – The agreed pick-up date can range from one day to several depending on the weight of your shipment. Your salesperson will discuss the transit times with you prior to registering your shipment with Bekins Traffic Department.

American Moving & Storage Association (AMSA) – The trade organization for the moving industry.amsa-logo

Appliance Service by Third Party – The preparation of major electrical appliances to make them safe for shipment. Charges for these services may be in addition to the line-haul charges.

Auto inventory – A form used when relocating an automobile, motorcycle or boat that lists the vehicle’s miles and condition at both origin and destination. Can also be referred to as motor vehicle inventory.

Auxiliary service or Shuttle Service – Use of a smaller vehicle to provide service when the residence is not accessible to the mover’s normal equipment. Shuttle service involves offloading the goods from the original equipment and reloading to a smaller vehicle. Depending on the weight of the shipment, this could involve several trips with the smaller vehicle. The shuttle charge is based on a rate-per-hundred weight.

DSCF0237Bill of Lading – The receipt for your goods and the contract for their transportation. It is your responsibility to understand the Bill of Lading before you sign it. If you do not agree with something on the Bill of Lading, do not sign it until you are satisfied that it is correct. The Bill of Lading is an important document. Don’t lose or misplace your copy.
Bingo sheet – A form that allows a van operator or customer to easily check off items as they are delivered. Also called a check-off sheet.

Booking agent – The agent who prepares the estimate of cost from the information obtained during a visual survey. The booking agent does not necessarily have to be located at or near the origin. When the booking agent is located at the origin, they will also be the origin agent and perform the visual survey.

Bulky article – To ensure safe transportation, some articles included in a shipment (e.g. big screen television, motorcycles, hot tubs, etc.) require extra handling and/or blocking. There is an extra charge for such items.

Carrier – The moving company holding the operating authority required to transport household goods.

Cash on Delivery (COD) – Transportation for an individual shipper for which payment is required at the time of delivery at the destination residence (or warehouse).

Certified scale – Any scale designed for weighing motor vehicles, including trailers or semitrailers not attached to a tractor, and certified by an authorized scale inspector and licensing authority. A certified scale may also be a platform or warehouse type scale that is properly inspected and certified.

Commercial shipper – Any person who is named as the consignor or consignee in a Bill of Lading contract who is not the owner of the goods being transported but who assumes the responsibility for payment of the transportation and other tariff charges for the account of the beneficial owner of the goods. The beneficial owner of the goods is normally an employee of the consignor and/or consignee.

Consignor – The person at origin who arranges for the transportation of the shipment.

Crating – Refers to the process of building a custom wood crate for the purpose of protecting certain items during transport.

Cube – A measurement of the capacity or cubic space of a truck or container. The industry average of is seven pounds per cubic foot.

Cube sheet – A document used to determine the cubic feet that furniture, appliances, cartons and miscellaneous articles occupy in the van. By converting the cubic feet into pounds, an estimated weight is acquired that is used in calculating the estimated cost for a move. Also referred to as a Table of Measurements.Bekins Table of Measurements (Cube Sheet)

 

CWT – An abbreviation for “per 100 pounds of specified weight.” Per-hundred weight.

Department of Transportation (DOT) – The federal agency which governs the interstate transportation industry, including movers of household goods.

Destination agent – Affiliated agent in the city to which the customer is moving. They are required to furnish storage at destination, unpacking and arranges for appliance service, if requested.

Disassembled by owner (DBO) – Items are disassembled by owner rather than by the moving company. Bekins is not responsible for the reassembly of these items.

Dispatcher – Assumes the task of communicating the route of a shipment to van operators and agents, making sure that instructions are carried out accordingly.

Estimate: Binding – This is a written agreement made in advance with the moving company. It guarantees the total cost of the move based upon the quantities and services shown on the estimate. Learn more about estimates.

Estimate: Non-Binding – This is an approximation of the cost by the moving company, based on the estimated weight of the shipment and the accessorial services requested. A non-binding estimate is not binding on the mover. The final charges will be based upon the actual weight of your shipment, the services provided and the tariff provisions in effect. Learn more about estimates.

Estimated Weight – An approximate weight of a shipment determined by multiplying the estimated cubes by seven pounds.

Expedited Service – An agreement with the mover to perform transportation by a set date in exchange for charges based on a higher minimum weight.

Extra delivery – A portion of a shipment unloaded at a location other than the destination address indicated on the Bill of Lading. Also referred to as an extra stop.

Extra pick up – A portion of a shipment loaded at a location other than the origin address indicated on the Bill of Lading. Also referred to as an extra stop.

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) – Established within the Department of Transportation to regulate the safe operation requirements for commercial vehicle drivers, carriers, vehicles and vehicle equipment.

Flight charge – An extra charge for carrying items up or down flights of stairs.

Fuel surcharge – The moving company’s tariff provides for a percentage adjustment to the transportation charge (and SIT Pickup and Delivery) to aid in recovery of the increased cost of fuel. The surcharge, which can change twice monthly, is based upon the national average cost of diesel, as reported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

Gross weight – The weight of the truck after a shipment has been loaded. Also referred to as the heavy weight.

Hauling agent – The agent who owns the van assigned by the van line to transport your household goods from origin to destination.

Helper – A peDSCF3289rson hired by the van operator or agent to assist in the loading and unloading of goods. Bekins requires all helper labor be certified.

High value article – Items included in a shipment that are valued at more than $100 per pound. These items should be disclosed with the mover to ensure they are protected accordingly. Also referred to as items of extraordinary value.

Household goods (HHG) – Personal goods or property used in a home.

Household goods descriptive inventory – The detailed descriptive list of your household goods showing the number and condition of each item. Also referred to as an inventory.

Individual shipper – The individual requesting movement of a shipment and paying the transportation charges.

Interstate move – The relocation of goods in the United States from a place in one state to a place in a different state.

Intrastate move – The relocation of goods within one state that never crosses state lines or includes a segment outside of that same state. Intrastate moves are NOT regulated by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration.

Inventory – The detailed descriptive list of your household goods showing the number and condition of each item. Also referred to as a household goods descriptive inventory.

Items of extraordinary value – Items included in a shipment that are valued at more than $100 per pound. These items should be disclosed with the mover to ensure they are protected accordingly. Also referred to as high value article. Learn more about replacement value protection.

Leave over – When articles to be shipped are left behind due to insufficient space on the primary van. An additional van(s) is then utilized for transportation and delivery. Also referred to as an overflow.

Light weight – The weight of a truck before a shipment is loaded, including all essential loading equipment and packing materials. Also referred to as the tare weight.

Line haul – The charges for the vehicle transportation portion of your relocation. These charges apply in addition to the accessorial service charges.

Load spread – Agreed pick-up dates.

Local move – A move within a particular geographical area like a town or district instead of a state or country. Learn more about local moves.

Long carry – An added charge for carrying articles excessive distances between the mover’s vehicle and the residence. Charges for these services may be in addition to the line-haul charges.

Motor vehicle inventory – A form used when transporting an automobile, motorcycle or boat that lists the vehicle’s miles and condition at both origin and destination. Also referred to as auto inventory.

Net weight – The actual weight of a shipment obtained by subtracting the tare weight from the gross weight.

Operating authority – The government permit that defines the scope of a carrier’s operation by area and commodity.

Order for Service – The document authorizing the mover to transport your household goods.

Order (Bill of Lading) number – The number used to identify and track your shipment. The number appears on all documentation and correspondence. Also referred to as the Registration Number.

Origin agent – The agent responsible for performing packing and preparing necessary documentation for the move. Click here to find your local agent.

Overflow – When articles to be shipped are left behind due to insufficient space on the primary van. An additional van(s) is then utilized for transportation and delivery. Also referred to as a leave over.

Packed by owner (PBO) – Used on the inventory to identify cartons that have been packed by the customer. Learn more about packing.

Packing date – A date set aside for packing. It is usually one day prior to loading of the goods.
Permanent storage – The warehousing of a shipment for an unspecified duration.

Pickup and delivery charges – Separate transportation charges applicable for transporting your shipment between the storage-in-transit warehouse and your residence.

Planner – Assumes the task of assigning a hauling agent to load, transport, and unload shipments as they are registered in Bekins Traffic Department.

promover_colorProMover Program – A certification program created by the American Moving & Storage Association (AMSA). The program gives consumers an easy way to separate reputable, professional movers from rogue movers. ProMovers must meet stringent requirements and agree to comply with the regulations set forth by AMSA as well as the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) and the Surface Transportation Board (STB). Bekins and all its agents are certified ProMovers.

Purchase order – A written authorization for billing a relocation to a company. It is sometimes used in place of the Order for Service.

Reweigh – When there is doubt about the origin weight of a shipment, a reweigh may be requested by the customer at destination. There is no charge for the reweigh; however, charges are calculated on the new weight.

Scale ticket – A voucher providing the weigh scale reading for tare weight and/or gross weight of a van.

Shuttle service – Use of a smaller vehicle to provide service when the residence is not accessible to the mover’s normal equipment. Shuttle service involves offloading the goods from the original equipment and reloading to a smaller vehicle. Depending on the weight of the shipment, this could involve several trips with the smaller vehicle. The shuttle charge is based on a rate-per-hundred weight. Also referred to as auxiliary service.

Spread dates – The combined dates for the agreed pick up and the agreed delivery.

Storage-in-transit (SIT) – Temporary warehouse storage of your shipment pending further transportation. For example, if your new home isn’t quite ready to occupy. You must specifically request SIT service, which may not exceed a total of 90 days of storage, and you will be responsible for the added charges for SIT service as well as the warehouse handling and final delivery charges.

Stretch wrap – The material and process used to protect overstuffed furniture (except leather and suede) from damage. Also referred to as shrink wrap.

Surface Transportation Board (STB) – The agency within the Department of Transportation responsible for the regulation and monitoring of railroads and rates for the household goods industry.

Table of Measurements – A document used to determine the cubic feet that furniture, appliances, cartons and miscellaneous articles occupy in the van. By converting the cubic feet into pounds, an estimated weight is acquired that is used in calculating the estimated cost for a move. Also referred to as a Cube Sheet.

Tare weight – The weight of a truck before a shipment is loaded, including all essential loading equipment and packing materials. Also referred to as the light weight.

Tariff – The mover’s required, published price, list of rules, regulations, rates and charges for the performance of interstate moving services.

Transit time – The time from when your belongings are picked up to when they are delivered to the designated destination.

Transportation charge – The cost of a single loading, transporting and unloading of goods comprise the charge.

Uncrating – Refers to the process of removing the wooden crating material from items that had been crated.

Unpacking – Services required to remove or undo packing of goods at the end of a shipment’s transportation. Learn more about Bekins unpacking services.

Valuation – The degree of “worth” of the shipment. The valuation charge compensates the mover for assuming a greater degree of liability than that provided for in the base transportation charges. Learn about Bekins valuation options.

Van line – A motor carrier with local agents that coordinates the movement of household goods and special products.

Van operator – The individual who oversees the loading, hauling and unloading of your household goods.

Visual survey – A visual survey is performed by the origin agent to determine which items are to be moved. The amount of packing required and any special services necessary to properly service your shipment are determined during the survey. A cube sheet is prepared and used to determine the weight. The weight is the basis for the moving cost. All elements of the survey come together to determine an estimated cost for moving your goods.

Your Rights and Responsibilities When You Move – A government-required publication given to all COD customers. Learn more about Your Rights and Responsibilities When You Move.

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Moving Lola

Today is National Dog Day – my favorite day! I wanted to share my experience about moving with my dog, Lola, and how to prepare for moving pets on interstate moves.

When my fiancée Pat was offered a relocation from Charlotte, N.C. to Indianapolis, Ind., the first thing we thought about was how our dog Lola would deal with the move?

Around three and a half years ago Lola was found as a stray and we decided to give her a home. She suffers from separation anxiety and we knew a move like this would be difficult for her.

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Lola, Pat and I after a hike in Charlotte, N.C.

Before our relocation, I made an appointment with Lola’s veterinarian. I spoke with her about the challenges that we may face when we moved. She suggested she may act out and although it could be frustrating we shouldn’t punish her because she is just confused. She recommended that we keep a close eye on her during the moving process and in our new home so she wouldn’t run away. We made sure all of Lola’s vaccinations were up-to-date and acquired a current veterinarian record to give to our new vet in Indianapolis as well as any boarding/grooming places that require vet records.

I also checked the US State and Territory Animal Import Regulations Web site to verify what to do when moving across state lines. I notified Charlotte Animal Care and Control that we were moving and gave them our new address. I updated the address for Lola’s microchip and identification tags, as well, in the event she does run away.

When we were packing all of our stuff, Lola noticed things were changing and this caused her to act increasingly anxious, which we were prepared for. We tried to do our best to make her feel comfortable and increased her daily exercise. This helped tire her out and not act out as much.

When we were loading our household goods onto the moving truck, we arranged for Lola to go to our neighbor’s house during this time so she would not be in the way. This is recommended for any household that has pet during a move.

For the ride to IndianLola 1apolis, it was a challenge to figure out what was needed for me and Pat, but also for Lola. We brought her bed, a few toys, bags, a water dish, water and food. With every stop, we made sure she was properly hydrated and well-fed. She slept most of the 10-hour drive. We stayed in a hotel on the way and used Pet’s Welcome Web site to determine which places permitted pets.

After 10 hours and a hotel stop we finally made it to our new home in Indianapolis. We allowed Lola to sniff around the house and acclimate herself to the new surroundings. Although we have a fenced-in yard, I still kept a close eye on her to make sure she wouldn’t escape. Lola is a notorious escape artist and fences don’t always do the trick.  When the movers came with our stuff, I kept Lola out of the way by keeping her on a leash outside.

Lola getting comfortable in our new home in Indianapolis

Lola getting comfortable in our new home in Indianapolis

It took a few weeks of adjustment. She went through a bit of a mourning period (she missed outrneighbor and her dog) and didn’t eat. I was worried and consulted with my vet. She explained that this is normal for dogs that experience a drastic change and she would eventually eat when she got hungry, which she did. I made sure that Lola had plenty of exercise by walking her frequently on the Monon Trail, a 13-mile trail in Indianapolis.

We also met our neighbors and let her play with their dog. By talking to our neighbors, we learned about the best places to take Lola, including parks, vets and boarding. We also used Angie’s List and Yelp to help find the best pet places around town.

We are all settled in Indianapolis now. Hopefully Lola’s moving experience can help you prepare for moving with your pet!

Tell us your story about moving with your pet!

For more about moving with pets, please visit http://www.bekins.com/planning-guides/moving-with-children-and-pets/

 

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The ULTIMATE Check List For Changing Your Address

Between hiring a moving company, packing up your household goods, and preparing for a new home, it is hard to find the time to change your address through various organizations. To better organize your move, Bekins Van Lines has created a list of everywhere you might need to change your address before and after moving.

Utilities:
America Move Assist can help finding new utility companies in your area

o    Electric *
o    Gas *
o    Water *
o    Garbage/Recycling *
o    Telephone/Mobile *
o    Cable *
o    Internet *
o    Fuel *
o    Water/Sewage *
o    Lawn/Garden Services/Pool Services
o    Housecleaning Services
o    Internet sites – iTunes, amazon, Netflix, etc.

Finance

o    Banks  – Make sure your current bank has branches in the area, if not, you may want to switching banks
o    Major Credit Cards
o    Department Store Credit Cards
o    Loan Institutions
o    Insurance Agencies * – Check to see if your coverage will need to change when moving to a different state or area.
o    Pension Plans
o    Air Rewards Programs
o    Accountant/Tax Consultant
o    Professional Memberships/Licensing Boards

Government Public Offices

o    DMV – Most states make you change this within 90 days of moving. Some states require a written test before obtaining a license
o    Vehicle Registration
o    Social Security *
o    Post Office *
o    Veteran Affairs *
o    Income Tax/IRS *
o    Pension Benefits *
o    Unemployment Insurance *

Personal
o    Register children for school * – Free school reports
o    Find new physicians and dentist
o    Find a new place to a new place of worship

* Changing your address is recommended before you move