Category Archives: Moving Tips


Bekins Van Lines Offers Updater, a Tool to Help Streamline Your Move

We get it – finding a new home is stressful enough, never mind everything you have to do in order to actually prepare for your move. You’re hit with a million and one moving tasks, from filling out your change-of-address form to finding home service providers in your area.

That’s why we’re trying to take a bit of the weight off of your shoulders.  Bekins has officially partnered with Updater, a time-saving tool that helps you save hours by streamlining the moving process. Through this partnership, Updater will be offered to all Bekins interstate moving customers.

With an Updater account, you can quickly and easily:

  • Update accounts and records: Automatically update any of over 15,000 business and account records including magazines, newspapers, charities, retail loyalty and frequent flier accounts, etc.
  • Connect home services: An Updater moving concierge helps set up your digital services including phone, Internet, and cable, identifying the best prices available and scheduling in-home installation appointments.
  • Forward mail: File your official U.S. Postal Service mail-forwarding form without setting foot in a post office.
  • Send digital moving announcements: Create a custom digital e-card to post on social media or send via email, notifying friends and family of your new address.
  • Claim exclusive move-in offers: Gain access to special offers and exclusive deals on moving expenses, such as discounts on professional cleaning services, packing supplies, local fitness classes, and more.

Interested in using Updater? Contact your local Bekins agent today to learn more about getting access to your own Updater account.


Five Easy Ways to Save Money on Your Move

Moving is expensive, but it doesn’t need to empty your wallet. The price of an interstate move is based on the weight of the shipment and the distance of a move. Local moves are calculated by handling time and added services, like packing. The bottom line is simple: the more stuff you move, the more it will cost you.

Cutting the cost of your move and staying organized will also alleviate the stress that comes with relocating. The key to a stress-free move is to get organized before your move and stay organized throughout the move. The more organized your move is, the more money you will save in the process.

The infographic below shows simple, effective ways to save money on your upcoming move and relieve the stresses that come with relocating.

Bekins - how to make your move profitable



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Reading with Kids

8 Books to Share with Your Kids Before a Move

The transition from an old house to a new house affects children in different ways than adults. Many children lack previous experience with moving, so they don’t know what to expect with such a major life change.

As a parent, you want to make a move as comfortable as possible for your children. One tool that helps you in your efforts is children’s literature. In a previous blog, we listed some helpful children’s books about moving. In this blog, we’ll name even more titles about moving created for children. Choose a few books from the list below to help your child prepare for your upcoming move.

For Toddlers

1. I Want to Go Home by Tony Ross

The Little Princess from I Want My Potty makes more demands in this fun story. This time she insists that her family move back to their former castle despite the extra room available in the new castle. This hilarious story will help children realize t he perks of moving house.


2. Bunny Bungalow by Cynthia Rylant Bunny Bungalow

A family of bunnies moves to a new bungalow and spruces it up to their liking in this short rhyming story. Toddler-aged readers will enjoy the whimsical illustrations. As you read, point out ways your child can personalize his or her new room just like the bunnies do with their bungalow.

For School-Age Kids

Chester's Way3. Chester’s Way by Kevin Henkes

Chester and his friend Wilson are best friends, but when Lilly moves in down the street, the dynamic of their friendship changes. Teach children to be nice as the new kid or to other new kids with this book. It’s a must for fans of Lilly’s Purple Plastic Purse.


4. The Berenstein Bears Moving Day by Stan and Jan Berenstein Bernstein Bears

Your child’s favorite talking bears move into their well-known tree house from their former home, a cave. Your kids will notice the Bear family doing typical moving activities, such as packing belongings into boxes, and feel more prepared for your move.


5. Alexander, Who’s Not (Do You Hear Me? I Mean It!) Going to Move by Judith Viorst alexander who's not

The same Alexander who had a terrible, horrible day puts his foot down about moving in this picture book. Read through this book with your strong-willed child if he or she has negative thoughts and feelings about moving.


6. Big Dan’s Moving Van by Leslie McGuire; illustrated by Joe Mahtieu Big Dan's Moving Van

Use this book to introduce your kids to how moving companies help with your family’s move. Readers follow Dan on a typical work day, from loading furniture into a moving truck to driving it to a new home. The story and the colorful illustrations familiarize children with moving professionals and reassure them that they’ll see their packed belongings again soon.

For Advanced Readers

7. Amber Brown Is Not a Crayon by Paula Danziger Amber Brown

Advanced elementary school readers will appreciate the candor and humor of the Amber Brown series as they approach your family’s move. In this first book in the series, Amber Brown does not move, but she deals with moving in two ways. First, her parents are separated, and her dad is moving to Paris. Second, her best friend and his family will be moving soon. Both situations cause Amber to confront the painful emotions caused by change and separation.

8. Superfudge by Judy Blume Superfudge

The hilarious cast of characters from Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing returns in this novel for pre-teens. Peter feels unhappy when he learns his family will move out of Manhattan to the New Jersey suburbs for a year. In their new neighborhood, Peter makes friends, tries new activities, and learns to handle the change.

If you’re preparing for a move, share these books with your children. Use them to start discussions about the good and difficult things about moving so your kids feel ready when moving day arrives.

Digital Image by Sean Locke
Digital Planet Design

Tips to Protect Your Flooring During a Move

After months of searching for a new home, you’ve finally found one with enough room to accommodate everyone. You wanted the house to look picture-perfect, so you applied a fresh coat of paint to each room and even installed new carpet and hardwood flooring.

But now that moving day has arrived, you realize that your flooring may be in danger. Sturdy work boots could track in dirt and stain your carpet fibers. Heavy furniture legs could scuff and scratch your cedar planking.

So what can you do to ensure your flooring looks pristine after the move?

IMG_8245If You Have Carpet

Shag carpet and area rugs can snag on moving boxes and unravel faster than you can blink. And carpet with shorter pile can still pull away from the edges if exposed to heavy foot traffic.

The following techniques will provide an extra layer of protection for your carpet.

Invest in Self-adhesive Carpet Film IMG_8233

You can purchase carpet plastic online for a fairly affordable price. Much like plastic wrap for your food, this carpeting covering will stick to the carpet and keep out dirt and debris. To prevent injury, you’ll want a plastic that provides a non-slip surface for your moving team.

Place Cardboard in Heavy Traffic Areas

Although carpet film will resist some degree of tearing, it won’t hold up well over frequent use. If you have movers following the same path through the living room to individual bedrooms, you’ll likely want a little extra cushion for these high-traffic areas. Cardboard will shield your carpet from mud and water, but like plastic it can create a slippery surface, so you’ll want to secure it in place with adhesives.

Wear Shoe Booties

If you worry about dust, dirt, and grass stains more than crushing carpet pile, you can encourage everyone who helps you move to put on shoe covers whenever they enter your home. Since you likely will only want shoe covers for the first few days of moving, you should buy a large pack of cheap, disposable booties rather than one or two expensive, longer-lasting covers.

If You Have Hardwood

Although hardwood flooring offers a great deal of durability and scratch-resistance, it won’t stay immune to dents or damage if you drop a heavy refrigerator or table.

To prevent gouges in your flooring, try these three tips.

Protecting the floor with paperLine Bedrooms with Paper

In areas with little foot traffic, you’ll want to line the floor with kraft paper to help the space stay clean and minimize scratching. Keep in mind that you’ll want plain, uncolored kraft paper, as colored paper and similar items may leach their dyes into your flooring.

You can also place cardboard on top of the paper for extra protection.

Lay Plywood in the Kitchen and Living Room

If you plan to move heavy furniture, such as a large TV or washing machine, you’ll want more protection than cardboard and paper can provide. If you drop the appliance, the force from the corner could easily dig past the cardboard and into your wooden tiles.

So, lay a thin sheet of plywood over your flooring before your movers arrive. Since plywood can have a few rough edges of its own, you’ll want to use it in conjunction with cardboard and paper.

Apply Furniture Sliders to Chair and Table LegsFurniture Sliders

Once the movers have gone, you’ll likely still need to move your table and chairs now and again to clean the floor or to simply fit your arrangement better. To prevent future scratches, apply furniture sliders to chair and table legs. These soft pieces of fabric will form a protective barrier between the chair and the floor, and they’ll help your table glide more smoothly when you need to shift its position.

Need Additional Tips?

These are just a few techniques you can implement on moving day to protect your home. For more tips, check our blog regularly. We’ll keep you posted on the best ways to make moving as simple and stress free as possible.

Labeling Boxes

How to Prepare Your Belongings for Temporary Storage

Whether you’re in the process of moving or your office is in the middle of a renovation, temporary storage is something to consider with all of your moving and storage options. It provides a safe place for you to store your belongings until it is convenient for you to finish moving.

In general, there are two types of temporary storage: an on-site unit kept at a moving company’s facility and a portable unit that you can have delivered to your new home at a time that is best for you.

Temporary storage can simplify your moving process. But haphazardly shoving things into boxes and dumping them into your unit could cause stress and frustration. Follow these steps to organize your packing and your unit.

Choose a Unit to Fit Your Needs

No matter if it’s a stationary unit or a portable unit, you want to select an appropriate size. A unit that is too big will end up costing more while a unit that is too small will make it difficult for you to fit everything. As a general rule of thumb, choose a unit that is a little Economy Moversbigger than what you actually need to help cut down on expense and stress.

If choosing the right size seems a little daunting, talk with your moving company. They can tell you approximately what size you will need based on what you plan to store. For example, furniture will take up more space than boxes of files, so your size decision will depend on what you need to temporarily store.

Pack Wisely

Because this is temporary storage, you don’t need to worry about taking special care to prepare your things for a long-term stay. However, you still want to protect your belongings so they aren’t damaged.

When packing your boxes, avoid stuffing too much in them or else the box might break. Invest in bubble wrap, furniture covers, and other packing materials to ensure your possessions arrive safely to the unit and then safely back to your home or office. To help with packing, defrost your fridge and freezer, drain your lawn mower and other machinery of fuel, and remove batteries from your devices. These extra precautions will keep your possessions safe.

As you pack, remember to label your boxes so you know what’s in them. This will make it easier for you to locate items in your unit later on. You can save yourself some time by deciding which boxes you will need access to during the transition period and grouping them accordingly. DSCF0301Then, when you pack your car or truck, you can put the boxes that you want at the front of your unit and the ones you won’t need at the back.

Remember to leave anything perishable or flammable out of your unit. Your moving company might have a few other restrictions on what you can store, so ask them if they have any specific regulations. Some companies might even pack and load your things for you.

Know Where Everything Is

To make a temporary situation even easier, you can create a diagram showing where everything in your unit is. This will save you time if you need to get something from your unit before moving day. If you’re planning on keeping only some of your possessions in the unit, you can also make a list of everything you have in your unit so you know what’s there and what is still in your car, hotel room, or elsewhere.

Take advantage of the convenience of temporary storage and the stress it will save you. By organizing and preparing your belongings, you will be able to save time and worry less. This will keep your possessions safe during a transition to a new home or a remodel at your office.


How to Make Sure Your Rental Passes Inspection After Moving Out

If you live in a rental apartment or house and are in the middle of moving out, it’s time to start thinking about cleaning. Most landlords require a move-in deposit that covers any damage or dirt left behind once you move out. Instead of giving up your deposit, you can almost guarantee a passed inspection with fool-proof cleaning tips. A few extra hours of deep cleaning can save you a precious few hundred bucks. Here’s what you’ll need to do.

Follow a Cleaning Checklist

It’s easy to get overwhelmed with the amount of cleaning tasks in front of you. Instead of keeping your mental to-do list in your head, write it out. Or better yet, find a cleaning checklist online. Print it out and physically check off each item as you complete them. A good rule of thumb is to complete the following cleaning tasks after the basics are covered:

  • patch nail holes with spackle and repaint
  • wipe baseboards with soapy warm water and a washcloth
  • scour the bathtub, but don’t use steel wool (it scratches the shiny porcelain layer off)
  • rent a carpet cleaner and deep clean all carpets twice
  • wash windows inside and out
  • dust off obscure areas (tops of ceiling fans, air vents, and ceiling corners)

rentalFocus on Curb Appeal

Especially if you rented a house, it’s important to spend time fixing up your outside area. If you moved in to a pristine yard and pleasant curb appeal, your landlord will expect the same appearance when you move out.

Get outside and weed the garden, mow the lawn, and trim the trees. Go the extra mile to plant some new flowers or water the grass more often than normal before moving out. If your car has leaked oil, use a rented pressure washer to clean off the driveway.

Spend Time in the Kitchen and Bathrooms

Real estate agents always say that kitchens and bathrooms sell houses. It’s true that these two rooms are the most distinct rooms in your home. Because of their unique functions, they’re also the easiest to get dirty. Spend extra time making sure they look spotless.

Clean your microwave, oven, and dishwasher fast with two ingredients: vinegar and water. Place a heat-safe container with 4 parts water and 1 part vinegar inside each machine and run them. The heat and moisture will make it easier to wipe off grime.

Wipe down bathroom fixtures with a mixture of water and lemon essential oil. It’s naturally antibacterial and leaves a fresh scent without all the chemicals. Pull out that vinegar mixture again, pour it in a plastic bag, and tie to your shower head. Let it sit for an hour, then run the hot water and see clogged spouts clear out.

rental-agreementThink Like a Landlord

Simply put, landlords care more about the cleanliness of the homes than you do. In all reality, they are the ones who have to present it perfectly clean to the next tenants.

After you’ve done most of your cleaning, put on your landlord goggles and walk through your home again. Be nitpicky. Look for small messes or damages that would raise a red flag to your landlord. Try to eliminate all of those red flags before you lock the door for good. A dirty door frame might be something most people overlook, but a landlord would not.

Hire Professional Cleaners

If you’ve got a particularly picky landlord, it might be best to bite the bullet and hire a cleaning company. When you’ve cleaned for hours (or even days) and still feel unsure about passing inspection, call the professionals in. Pay for a few hours of cleaning, and enjoy your full deposit later. It’s a small investment that has great returns. As a plus, your landlord can’t dispute a professional cleaning job.

When you go the extra mile before moving, you’ll pass your cleaning inspection with flying colors. Make your move even easier with help from professionals such as a cleaning or moving company.

Office Moving

Stay Cool During your Summer Move

It’s hot outside and you feel as if you can cut the humid air with a knife and are just dreading the thought of packing and loading all of your stuff. Not only is this uncomfortable, but moving in the heat could be dangerous if you don’t take precautions. Below are some tips to stay safe in the heat during your move.

Stay Hydrated 

Your body will need more water to stay hydrated and keep your core body temperature where it needs to be. Drink 5-7 ounces of fluids every 15 to 20 minutes to replenish the necessary fluids in your body. Beverages with electrolytes will keep yourself energized, waterbut avoid energy drinks.

Also, eat foods that will give your energy while not dehydrating you. Instead of foods with high sodium content (salt) opt for fruits, vegetables, nuts and protein to help get you through the day. Also avoid caffeine and alcohol which can speed up dehydration.

AC on both ends of the move

If possible, don’t turn off your electricity in your new home until the day after you move, and schedule the power to be turned on in your new home a day before you move in. That way, you will be able to use your air conditioning during loading and delivery. If you don’t have air conditioning, consider buying fans to keep you cool keep during your move.

Dress Appropriately

Dress in a light colored t-shirt and in shorts to help keep cool. Lighter clothes will improve your circulation during the move, which helps prevent heat stroke and heat exhaustion. If the temperature is very hot, dampen a towel or cloth in cold water and place it on top of your shoulders. This may sound uncomfortable, but it will help keep your core body temperature down.

Take Breaks

It’s hard to do, especially when moving, but try not to over exert yourself. Rest frequently in a cool spot. Try to move items either early morning or later in the day when it may be cooler.

SunscreenWear sunscreen

Use a sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15. Apply the sunscreen over exposed skin and reapply every two hours, especially if you are sweating profusely. It is also a good idea to wear a hat to protect your scalp from getting burnt.

Hire a professional mover

Sit back and relax in the air conditioning while professional movers do all the work. Professional movers are trained to take care of themselves in extreme temperature. There won’t be any risk of you overheating or even breaking a sweat.

Learn more about Bekins professional moving services.


References: Mayo Clinic, News Medical 




Corporate Relocation Terms You Should Know

Even if you’ve had experience with corporate relocations in the past, you need to brush up on jargon and processes. After all, relocation companies and van lines will use specific terms to describe and prepare you for the move.

Your understanding of these terms can make the relocation process smoother, so take some time to read through the definitions below. You’ll be glad you did so you know exactly what’s going on and what to expect from each stage of the process.

Common Terms Defined

  1. Relocation Package: Materials and information related to the relocation destination. This package provides a basic foundation for your understanding of the new location. Companies may offer specific packages, including the following options:
  • Full pack/unpack
  • Childcare
  • Home finding/buying
  • Elder care
  • Auto transfers
  • Home sale service
  • Lodging
  • Spousal support
  • Storage
  • Temporary housing
  • Expenses
  1. Intrastate and Interstate: The former refers to moves within the same state, but outside the 30-mile local move limit. The latter means the move takes place across state lines.
  2. Cartons: Boxes in various shapes and sizes provided by your chosen moving carrier for the transport of your items.A moving agent greeting a customer.
  3. Moving Coordinator/Consultant: The employee your carrier provides as your single point of contact. From origin to destination, your moving coordinator will contact movers, help you make decisions, and contract any additional services.
  4. Survey: An initial estimate of moving charges conducted by an agent. Usually conducted at the site of origin through visual and inventory checks.
  5. Agent: Carrier employee with authority to act on behalf of the carrier in booking and various other services.
  6. Booking Agent: Carrier employee responsible for accepting and registering your order date and time. Can also double as the origin or destination agent.
  7. Destination Agent: Carrier employee designated to provide assistance and information at your destination.
  8. Origin Agent: Carrier employee designated to assist in readying the shipment and providing information at origin.
  9. Accessorial Charges: Charges such as packing, appliance service, or unpacking in addition to basic freight and transportation costs.
  10. Appliance Service: Preparing large electrical home appliances to ready them for safe shipment.
  11. Moving InShuttle: A smaller truck used to load belongings when a full-sized moving van won’t fit at your origin location. Need for and use of a shuttle usually results in additional costs.
  12. Bill of Lading: Your receipt for services and transport contract. Your signature will acknowledge the release of all goods and items to your carrier at the agreed-upon price.
  13. Valuation Coverage: The liability of household goods carriers operating in interstate commerce (moving from one state to another) is based upon the customer’s declaration of value made prior to the time the shipment is loaded.
  14. Weight Ticket: Statement of van weight while empty and then following shipment loading. This weight ticket helps calculate the total cost of your freight bill.
  15. Storage in Transit (SIT): Temporary storage provided by your carrier warehouse, pending further transport at a later date. If service exceeds 180 calendar days, your shipment falls under the ruling of local warehouse organizers.
  16. Tariff: A publication with carrier rules, rates, regulations, and services available for your move.
  17. Third-Party Service: Any service performed by someone outside your original carrier by your request. Also non-carrier affiliates performing services because of a state, federal, or local law.
  18. Unpacking: An example of additional service you may request. Involves carrier employees removing your items from cartons and placing them on a flat surface while disposing of packing materials. Unpacking services happen upon delivery unless otherwise requested.

Knowledge Is Power

With a basic understanding of the above terms, you can go forward in your move with confidence. Consult your employer and moving company regarding various relocation packages and what perks you can expect.

Potted plants

Moving your Plants to your new Home

If you garden at all-anything from a small succulent in your kitchen window to a full-blown vegetable garden in your backyard you put a lot of time, effort, and care into growing your plants. Because of the hard work you’ve put into them, it may be difficult to leave your plants behind.

Movers typically don’t transport plants because of state regulations and extreme temperature and lack of sunlight in the truck can be fatal. Double check with your local Bekins agents before you pack your plants. After you make sure the place you’re moving to has the right climate and soil for your plants, you can easily pack them up and move them yourself.

Here are a few different common plants and how to best move them.


First, trim down bigger, sturdier plants to about 6-12 inches. This makes them easier to

move, it encourages regrowth when you replant them, and it’s actually healthier for the plant. If you leave lots of stems, leaves, or flowers, it can stress out the plant because it’s trying to keep so much more of itself alive.

After trimming down the plants, dig them up-making sure to keep a lot of dirt around the roots-and put them in paper bags.

Make sure you’re using paper bags instead of plastic so the plants can still breathe. If you have to use plastic, poke some holes in it. The plants should be fine for a couple of weeks as long as they don’t get too hot or dry. Just make sure they’re in the shade during the move.

Potted Plants

The first thing to do is to make sure that you’re not moving your potted plants in nice ceramic pots-you don’t want those to break on the road. Move the plants to plastic pots a couple weeks before the move to give them a chance to get used to the new pots. Potted PlantA couple days before the move, water the plants; not too much, not too little. You don’t want them drying out, but you also don’t want them molding.

Next, put the plants in boxes and make sure they’re snug. You can stuff paper or bubble wrap around the pots to make sure they don’t get jostled around. If possible, keep the top of the boxes open to ensure they don’t get crushed by something else.

Also, don’t forget: plenty of your outdoor plants can move to pots. Things like herbs are commonly grown in pots. As long as you give them enough time to readjust to the pots before the move, they should be perfectly fine to travel.


You have two options here, and your choice depends on your space and resources. Your first option is to dig up the entire plant and replant it in a large bucket, such as a five gallon bucket used for food storage. These buckets should sit in your personal vehicle.

Tomato plantThe second option is to cut the plant and put the cutting in a floral tube, making sure it stays moist by covering it with wet paper towels. If you don’t have a floral tube, you can use a potato soaked in water. This method is easier and safer than trying to relocate an entire tomato plant.

When you get to your new home, replant the plants right away. The less time they spend in limbo, the better. Keep in mind that your perennials and vegetables might not look quite as large and beautiful as they did before the move, at least for a while. If they stayed dormant during the move, they can put their energy into root growth once they’re replanted.

If you use these tips to move your plants, next year they should be big and beautiful again-you just have to give them time to recover.

Baby Relocating

Moving with your Infant: 7 Ways to make it Safe & Easy

Have an infant but need to relocate?

Don’t worry. You can achieve a safe and easy move even with your small child in tow. From advanced planning to packing and basic moving tips, the following guide covers everything you need to complete your move with a happy, healthy, and cared-for baby.

Before the Move

Advanced planning is an absolute must when you have an infant. In addition to your regular moving to-dos, add these items to your list:

  1. Create a Meal Plan

Packing boxes and organizing transportation is no easy feat. You might struggle to find time to feed your baby, let alone time to feed yourself. So before your move, take the time to plan a few simple meals to keep up your energy levels. Stick with simple foods you can take on the go, like sandwiches and trail mix.

  1. Book a Babysitter

You and your significant other can take turns packing and watching the baby, but you’ll Moving with a baby 2definitely need help on moving day. You don’t want to worry about your child crawling under foot or crying unnoticed in the corner as you load boxes into the truck.

So hire a professional service, or ask a friend or family member help. Make sure your sitter knows the right date and time, and give plenty of advanced notice. If you worry your go-to sitter might not be available, ask a back-up babysitter to help, just in case.

  1. Find a Pediatrician

Your baby could get sick before, en route, or once you’ve arrived at your new place. To avoid a stressful situation, find a good pediatrician before your move. Ask around, read reviews, and visit your child’s new doctor.

Also, keep copies of your child’s medical records on hand, or mail them in advance to the pediatrician. This way you can keep your child up-to-date on his or her immunizations despite the move.

During the Move

Now that you’ve planned your entire move, it’s time to prepare you and your baby for the official moving day.

  1. Put Together aMoving In Travel Case of Baby Essentials

Think everything you use to care for your baby day and a night. Since moving services may deliver your items before or after you arrive, you’ll want to keep certain essentials with you. This could include:

  • Diapers and wipes
  • Diaper rash ointment
  • Changing pad
  • Changes of clothes
  • Toys and snacks
  • Plenty of baby food
  • First-aid kit
  • Plastic bags for trash
  • Stroller
  • Portable crib
  • One or two blankets
  • Sunscreen

Although packing these items can sometimes seem look more hassle than its worth, you’ll be happy you have them during an emergency.

  1. Take Extra Time En Route

If you are traveling to your new home via road trip or plane, realize that it will take extra time when you have an infant. Plan for frequent stops along the way for feeding, bathroom, or just to take a break.

Bring a noisemaker or recorded sounds that soothe your baby during the trip.

After the Move

Congratulations! You made it through the journey to your new hoSmallerme. But you’re not finished yet.

  1. Enjoy Your First Meal in Your New Home

Upon arrival, plan for an easy takeout meal on the kitchen floor. You can turn this into a fun picnic by spreading a blanket out and taking your meal together with some paper napkins.

  1. Catch Up on Your Sleep

After you’ve eaten and fed your infant, take a few minutes to unpack your basic essentials. This could include a few blankets to sleep on, or finding your toothbrush in your toiletries bag. From there, do what’s necessary to settle in and enjoy your first night in your new home.

If you can, try to remain consistent with your infant’s sleep schedule. Soon you and your family will adjust to your new home and new routine.