Category Archives: Moving Tips

Labeling Boxes

How to Prepare Your Belongings for Temporary Storage

Whether you’re in the process of moving or your office is in the middle of a renovation, temporary storage is something to consider with all of your moving and storage options. It provides a safe place for you to store your belongings until it is convenient for you to finish moving.

In general, there are two types of temporary storage: an on-site unit kept at a moving company’s facility and a portable unit that you can have delivered to your new home at a time that is best for you.

Temporary storage can simplify your moving process. But haphazardly shoving things into boxes and dumping them into your unit could cause stress and frustration. Follow these steps to organize your packing and your unit.

Choose a Unit to Fit Your Needs

No matter if it’s a stationary unit or a portable unit, you want to select an appropriate size. A unit that is too big will end up costing more while a unit that is too small will make it difficult for you to fit everything. As a general rule of thumb, choose a unit that is a little Economy Moversbigger than what you actually need to help cut down on expense and stress.

If choosing the right size seems a little daunting, talk with your moving company. They can tell you approximately what size you will need based on what you plan to store. For example, furniture will take up more space than boxes of files, so your size decision will depend on what you need to temporarily store.

Pack Wisely

Because this is temporary storage, you don’t need to worry about taking special care to prepare your things for a long-term stay. However, you still want to protect your belongings so they aren’t damaged.

When packing your boxes, avoid stuffing too much in them or else the box might break. Invest in bubble wrap, furniture covers, and other packing materials to ensure your possessions arrive safely to the unit and then safely back to your home or office. To help with packing, defrost your fridge and freezer, drain your lawn mower and other machinery of fuel, and remove batteries from your devices. These extra precautions will keep your possessions safe.

As you pack, remember to label your boxes so you know what’s in them. This will make it easier for you to locate items in your unit later on. You can save yourself some time by deciding which boxes you will need access to during the transition period and grouping them accordingly. DSCF0301Then, when you pack your car or truck, you can put the boxes that you want at the front of your unit and the ones you won’t need at the back.

Remember to leave anything perishable or flammable out of your unit. Your moving company might have a few other restrictions on what you can store, so ask them if they have any specific regulations. Some companies might even pack and load your things for you.

Know Where Everything Is

To make a temporary situation even easier, you can create a diagram showing where everything in your unit is. This will save you time if you need to get something from your unit before moving day. If you’re planning on keeping only some of your possessions in the unit, you can also make a list of everything you have in your unit so you know what’s there and what is still in your car, hotel room, or elsewhere.

Take advantage of the convenience of temporary storage and the stress it will save you. By organizing and preparing your belongings, you will be able to save time and worry less. This will keep your possessions safe during a transition to a new home or a remodel at your office.

Cleaning

How to Make Sure Your Rental Passes Inspection After Moving Out

If you live in a rental apartment or house and are in the middle of moving out, it’s time to start thinking about cleaning. Most landlords require a move-in deposit that covers any damage or dirt left behind once you move out. Instead of giving up your deposit, you can almost guarantee a passed inspection with fool-proof cleaning tips. A few extra hours of deep cleaning can save you a precious few hundred bucks. Here’s what you’ll need to do.

Follow a Cleaning Checklist

It’s easy to get overwhelmed with the amount of cleaning tasks in front of you. Instead of keeping your mental to-do list in your head, write it out. Or better yet, find a cleaning checklist online. Print it out and physically check off each item as you complete them. A good rule of thumb is to complete the following cleaning tasks after the basics are covered:

  • patch nail holes with spackle and repaint
  • wipe baseboards with soapy warm water and a washcloth
  • scour the bathtub, but don’t use steel wool (it scratches the shiny porcelain layer off)
  • rent a carpet cleaner and deep clean all carpets twice
  • wash windows inside and out
  • dust off obscure areas (tops of ceiling fans, air vents, and ceiling corners)

rentalFocus on Curb Appeal

Especially if you rented a house, it’s important to spend time fixing up your outside area. If you moved in to a pristine yard and pleasant curb appeal, your landlord will expect the same appearance when you move out.

Get outside and weed the garden, mow the lawn, and trim the trees. Go the extra mile to plant some new flowers or water the grass more often than normal before moving out. If your car has leaked oil, use a rented pressure washer to clean off the driveway.

Spend Time in the Kitchen and Bathrooms

Real estate agents always say that kitchens and bathrooms sell houses. It’s true that these two rooms are the most distinct rooms in your home. Because of their unique functions, they’re also the easiest to get dirty. Spend extra time making sure they look spotless.

Clean your microwave, oven, and dishwasher fast with two ingredients: vinegar and water. Place a heat-safe container with 4 parts water and 1 part vinegar inside each machine and run them. The heat and moisture will make it easier to wipe off grime.

Wipe down bathroom fixtures with a mixture of water and lemon essential oil. It’s naturally antibacterial and leaves a fresh scent without all the chemicals. Pull out that vinegar mixture again, pour it in a plastic bag, and tie to your shower head. Let it sit for an hour, then run the hot water and see clogged spouts clear out.

rental-agreementThink Like a Landlord

Simply put, landlords care more about the cleanliness of the homes than you do. In all reality, they are the ones who have to present it perfectly clean to the next tenants.

After you’ve done most of your cleaning, put on your landlord goggles and walk through your home again. Be nitpicky. Look for small messes or damages that would raise a red flag to your landlord. Try to eliminate all of those red flags before you lock the door for good. A dirty door frame might be something most people overlook, but a landlord would not.

Hire Professional Cleaners

If you’ve got a particularly picky landlord, it might be best to bite the bullet and hire a cleaning company. When you’ve cleaned for hours (or even days) and still feel unsure about passing inspection, call the professionals in. Pay for a few hours of cleaning, and enjoy your full deposit later. It’s a small investment that has great returns. As a plus, your landlord can’t dispute a professional cleaning job.

When you go the extra mile before moving, you’ll pass your cleaning inspection with flying colors. Make your move even easier with help from professionals such as a cleaning or moving company.

Office Moving

Stay Cool During your Summer Move

It’s hot outside and you feel as if you can cut the humid air with a knife and are just dreading the thought of packing and loading all of your stuff. Not only is this uncomfortable, but moving in the heat could be dangerous if you don’t take precautions. Below are some tips to stay safe in the heat during your move.

Stay Hydrated 

Your body will need more water to stay hydrated and keep your core body temperature where it needs to be. Drink 5-7 ounces of fluids every 15 to 20 minutes to replenish the necessary fluids in your body. Beverages with electrolytes will keep yourself energized, waterbut avoid energy drinks.

Also, eat foods that will give your energy while not dehydrating you. Instead of foods with high sodium content (salt) opt for fruits, vegetables, nuts and protein to help get you through the day. Also avoid caffeine and alcohol which can speed up dehydration.

AC on both ends of the move

If possible, don’t turn off your electricity in your new home until the day after you move, and schedule the power to be turned on in your new home a day before you move in. That way, you will be able to use your air conditioning during loading and delivery. If you don’t have air conditioning, consider buying fans to keep you cool keep during your move.

Dress Appropriately

Dress in a light colored t-shirt and in shorts to help keep cool. Lighter clothes will improve your circulation during the move, which helps prevent heat stroke and heat exhaustion. If the temperature is very hot, dampen a towel or cloth in cold water and place it on top of your shoulders. This may sound uncomfortable, but it will help keep your core body temperature down.

Take Breaks

It’s hard to do, especially when moving, but try not to over exert yourself. Rest frequently in a cool spot. Try to move items either early morning or later in the day when it may be cooler.

SunscreenWear sunscreen

Use a sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15. Apply the sunscreen over exposed skin and reapply every two hours, especially if you are sweating profusely. It is also a good idea to wear a hat to protect your scalp from getting burnt.

Hire a professional mover

Sit back and relax in the air conditioning while professional movers do all the work. Professional movers are trained to take care of themselves in extreme temperature. There won’t be any risk of you overheating or even breaking a sweat.

Learn more about Bekins professional moving services.

 

References: Mayo Clinic, News Medical 

 

 

DSCF0239

Corporate Relocation Terms You Should Know

Even if you’ve had experience with corporate relocations in the past, you need to brush up on jargon and processes. After all, relocation companies and van lines will use specific terms to describe and prepare you for the move.

Your understanding of these terms can make the relocation process smoother, so take some time to read through the definitions below. You’ll be glad you did so you know exactly what’s going on and what to expect from each stage of the process.

Common Terms Defined

  1. Relocation Package: Materials and information related to the relocation destination. This package provides a basic foundation for your understanding of the new location. Companies may offer specific packages, including the following options:
  • Full pack/unpack
  • Childcare
  • Home finding/buying
  • Elder care
  • Auto transfers
  • Home sale service
  • Lodging
  • Spousal support
  • Storage
  • Temporary housing
  • Expenses
  1. Intrastate and Interstate: The former refers to moves within the same state, but outside the 30-mile local move limit. The latter means the move takes place across state lines.
  2. Cartons: Boxes in various shapes and sizes provided by your chosen moving carrier for the transport of your items.A moving agent greeting a customer.
  3. Moving Coordinator/Consultant: The employee your carrier provides as your single point of contact. From origin to destination, your moving coordinator will contact movers, help you make decisions, and contract any additional services.
  4. Survey: An initial estimate of moving charges conducted by an agent. Usually conducted at the site of origin through visual and inventory checks.
  5. Agent: Carrier employee with authority to act on behalf of the carrier in booking and various other services.
  6. Booking Agent: Carrier employee responsible for accepting and registering your order date and time. Can also double as the origin or destination agent.
  7. Destination Agent: Carrier employee designated to provide assistance and information at your destination.
  8. Origin Agent: Carrier employee designated to assist in readying the shipment and providing information at origin.
  9. Accessorial Charges: Charges such as packing, appliance service, or unpacking in addition to basic freight and transportation costs.
  10. Appliance Service: Preparing large electrical home appliances to ready them for safe shipment.
  11. Moving InShuttle: A smaller truck used to load belongings when a full-sized moving van won’t fit at your origin location. Need for and use of a shuttle usually results in additional costs.
  12. Bill of Lading: Your receipt for services and transport contract. Your signature will acknowledge the release of all goods and items to your carrier at the agreed-upon price.
  13. Valuation Coverage: The liability of household goods carriers operating in interstate commerce (moving from one state to another) is based upon the customer’s declaration of value made prior to the time the shipment is loaded.
  14. Weight Ticket: Statement of van weight while empty and then following shipment loading. This weight ticket helps calculate the total cost of your freight bill.
  15. Storage in Transit (SIT): Temporary storage provided by your carrier warehouse, pending further transport at a later date. If service exceeds 180 calendar days, your shipment falls under the ruling of local warehouse organizers.
  16. Tariff: A publication with carrier rules, rates, regulations, and services available for your move.
  17. Third-Party Service: Any service performed by someone outside your original carrier by your request. Also non-carrier affiliates performing services because of a state, federal, or local law.
  18. Unpacking: An example of additional service you may request. Involves carrier employees removing your items from cartons and placing them on a flat surface while disposing of packing materials. Unpacking services happen upon delivery unless otherwise requested.

Knowledge Is Power

With a basic understanding of the above terms, you can go forward in your move with confidence. Consult your employer and moving company regarding various relocation packages and what perks you can expect.

Potted plants

Moving your Plants to your new Home

If you garden at all-anything from a small succulent in your kitchen window to a full-blown vegetable garden in your backyard you put a lot of time, effort, and care into growing your plants. Because of the hard work you’ve put into them, it may be difficult to leave your plants behind.

Movers typically don’t transport plants because of state regulations and extreme temperature and lack of sunlight in the truck can be fatal. Double check with your local Bekins agents before you pack your plants. After you make sure the place you’re moving to has the right climate and soil for your plants, you can easily pack them up and move them yourself.

Here are a few different common plants and how to best move them.

Perennials/Grasses

First, trim down bigger, sturdier plants to about 6-12 inches. This makes them easier to

gardenguides.com

gardenguides.com

move, it encourages regrowth when you replant them, and it’s actually healthier for the plant. If you leave lots of stems, leaves, or flowers, it can stress out the plant because it’s trying to keep so much more of itself alive.

After trimming down the plants, dig them up-making sure to keep a lot of dirt around the roots-and put them in paper bags.

Make sure you’re using paper bags instead of plastic so the plants can still breathe. If you have to use plastic, poke some holes in it. The plants should be fine for a couple of weeks as long as they don’t get too hot or dry. Just make sure they’re in the shade during the move.

Potted Plants

The first thing to do is to make sure that you’re not moving your potted plants in nice ceramic pots-you don’t want those to break on the road. Move the plants to plastic pots a couple weeks before the move to give them a chance to get used to the new pots. Potted PlantA couple days before the move, water the plants; not too much, not too little. You don’t want them drying out, but you also don’t want them molding.

Next, put the plants in boxes and make sure they’re snug. You can stuff paper or bubble wrap around the pots to make sure they don’t get jostled around. If possible, keep the top of the boxes open to ensure they don’t get crushed by something else.

Also, don’t forget: plenty of your outdoor plants can move to pots. Things like herbs are commonly grown in pots. As long as you give them enough time to readjust to the pots before the move, they should be perfectly fine to travel.

Vegetables

You have two options here, and your choice depends on your space and resources. Your first option is to dig up the entire plant and replant it in a large bucket, such as a five gallon bucket used for food storage. These buckets should sit in your personal vehicle.

Tomato plantThe second option is to cut the plant and put the cutting in a floral tube, making sure it stays moist by covering it with wet paper towels. If you don’t have a floral tube, you can use a potato soaked in water. This method is easier and safer than trying to relocate an entire tomato plant.

When you get to your new home, replant the plants right away. The less time they spend in limbo, the better. Keep in mind that your perennials and vegetables might not look quite as large and beautiful as they did before the move, at least for a while. If they stayed dormant during the move, they can put their energy into root growth once they’re replanted.

If you use these tips to move your plants, next year they should be big and beautiful again-you just have to give them time to recover.

Baby Relocating

Moving with your Infant: 7 Ways to make it Safe & Easy

Have an infant but need to relocate?

Don’t worry. You can achieve a safe and easy move even with your small child in tow. From advanced planning to packing and basic moving tips, the following guide covers everything you need to complete your move with a happy, healthy, and cared-for baby.

Before the Move

Advanced planning is an absolute must when you have an infant. In addition to your regular moving to-dos, add these items to your list:

  1. Create a Meal Plan

Packing boxes and organizing transportation is no easy feat. You might struggle to find time to feed your baby, let alone time to feed yourself. So before your move, take the time to plan a few simple meals to keep up your energy levels. Stick with simple foods you can take on the go, like sandwiches and trail mix.

  1. Book a Babysitter

You and your significant other can take turns packing and watching the baby, but you’ll Moving with a baby 2definitely need help on moving day. You don’t want to worry about your child crawling under foot or crying unnoticed in the corner as you load boxes into the truck.

So hire a professional service, or ask a friend or family member help. Make sure your sitter knows the right date and time, and give plenty of advanced notice. If you worry your go-to sitter might not be available, ask a back-up babysitter to help, just in case.

  1. Find a Pediatrician

Your baby could get sick before, en route, or once you’ve arrived at your new place. To avoid a stressful situation, find a good pediatrician before your move. Ask around, read reviews, and visit your child’s new doctor.

Also, keep copies of your child’s medical records on hand, or mail them in advance to the pediatrician. This way you can keep your child up-to-date on his or her immunizations despite the move.

During the Move

Now that you’ve planned your entire move, it’s time to prepare you and your baby for the official moving day.

  1. Put Together aMoving In Travel Case of Baby Essentials

Think everything you use to care for your baby day and a night. Since moving services may deliver your items before or after you arrive, you’ll want to keep certain essentials with you. This could include:

  • Diapers and wipes
  • Diaper rash ointment
  • Changing pad
  • Changes of clothes
  • Toys and snacks
  • Plenty of baby food
  • First-aid kit
  • Plastic bags for trash
  • Stroller
  • Portable crib
  • One or two blankets
  • Sunscreen

Although packing these items can sometimes seem look more hassle than its worth, you’ll be happy you have them during an emergency.

  1. Take Extra Time En Route

If you are traveling to your new home via road trip or plane, realize that it will take extra time when you have an infant. Plan for frequent stops along the way for feeding, bathroom, or just to take a break.

Bring a noisemaker or recorded sounds that soothe your baby during the trip.

After the Move

Congratulations! You made it through the journey to your new hoSmallerme. But you’re not finished yet.

  1. Enjoy Your First Meal in Your New Home

Upon arrival, plan for an easy takeout meal on the kitchen floor. You can turn this into a fun picnic by spreading a blanket out and taking your meal together with some paper napkins.

  1. Catch Up on Your Sleep

After you’ve eaten and fed your infant, take a few minutes to unpack your basic essentials. This could include a few blankets to sleep on, or finding your toothbrush in your toiletries bag. From there, do what’s necessary to settle in and enjoy your first night in your new home.

If you can, try to remain consistent with your infant’s sleep schedule. Soon you and your family will adjust to your new home and new routine.

Temporary Relocation

Simplifying Your Temporary Move

Whether you’re moving to graduate school or teaching abroad, temporary moves can be tricky. You don’t want to bring your childhood stuffed animal or large antique dresser, but you just can’t throw them away, either. What should you do?

If you’re preparing to embark on an adventure without all your belongings, use our tips below. We’ll help you navigate your journey and make the most of the process.

Step 1: Get Organized to Simplify Packing

Packing for any type of move is stressful, so pack in an organized fashion to make your temporary move much smoother. First, find or buy more moving boxes than you think you’ll need. That way you won’t have to stop halfway through packing if you run out. Next, tape up your boxes and label each box as one of three things:

  • Take
  • Store
  • Throw Awaya box full of clothes to be donated.

Go through your rooms one at a time and sort everything into boxes labeled as one of these three categories. When you fill a box, put it in a designated corner in your living room and start a new one. Don’t leave the room you’re packing until everything is boxed up. Pretty soon your living room will have three different corners filled with organized boxes.

When you’re packing this way, it’s important to be ruthless. All those old college textbooks you’ve been carrying around need to get tossed for good. Plan to pack less than you can technically bring with you in your Take boxes, and you’ll probably pack exactly what you need.

Step 2: Find a Temporary Tenant

If you plan to move back into the house or condo you own, secure a temporary tenant for the time you’ll be gone. It might be a risk to arrange a month-to-month lease since your tenant can technically terminate at any time, but you won’t be homeless if you decide to come back earlier than planned.

You can also hire a property management company to manage any landlord duties while you’re away. They’ll collect rent and handle rental-agreementcomplaints and maintenance tickets for you.

Step 3: Find Temporary Housing in Your New Area

Long-term housing is often easier to find than temporary housing. As a result, when you’re looking for temporary housing in your new city, state, or country, you might have to think outside the box. Can you find a room to rent through websites like Air BNB? Is anyone from your program moving with you? See if you can move in together to cut costs.

If your stay is quite short, you can always book a room in a long-term hotel.

Step 4: Forward Your Mail

The US Post Office makes mail forwarding simple-you just need to fill out their online form. The process costs a dollar or slightly more, so have your credit card handy.

You can forward your mail in 6-month increments. Just remember to revisit the website and extend your mail forwarding after 6 months if you’re staying longer than that.

Step 5: Store Your Belongings

This should be your final step before you fly out. Be sure to label all boxes by room so they’re easier to unpack when you return.

To stay organized and make the process easier, hire a moving company. Plus, some moving companies offer storage units along with their moving services. You can simplify your move Economy Moversby hiring one company to take care of both tasks.

If you live alone in an apartment, you’ll only need a 10 x 10 unit. If you have a family or a house full furniture, plan to rent a unit that’s at least 10 x 20. If you’re leaving your car, you can park it in the unit, too.

If you follow these tips, your temporary move will be much less stressful. Call a moving company to get started on your new adventure.

Attractive young adult couple lying on home floor with coffee cups smiling and looking at blueprints.

The Hidden Costs of Moving

So you have taken the plunge and decided to move. This is a big step, and one worthy of congratulation. But with this exciting step forward comes a lot of costs-some expected, some unexpected.

No matter what your housing situation, planning a move turns out to be an expensive endeavor. By this point, you have looked carefully at mortgage rates, rent costs, moving company deposits and so forth. But what you may not have considered are some of the smaller costs of moving.

Whether you are up sizing, downsizing, or just moving locations, these hidden costs can overwhelm your budget if you are not careful. As you budget your move, remember to keep the following hidden costs in mind.

Packing Supplies

Whether you are packing things up yourself or plan on hiring a professional moving Moving Incompany do the work, you will need boxes, bins, tape, bubble wrap, and markers. Some packing services take care of the supplies and include the cost in the final fee. Others don’t charge for labor and supplies, but may charge fees for extra packing boxes needed for added safety during the move. Either way, make sure you account for this cost.

Storing Possessions

Sometimes moves have unexpected delays. Closing on a house might take longer than anticipated, or previous tenants might not vacate the property on time. In such situations, the best solution is often to store your possessions until you are able to move in.

Prices for storage units vary, depending on size, climate control, and security measures. Though hopefully your move will go off without any delays, budget for storage for a few weeks in case you need to accommodate delays.

Managing Utility Accounts

Closing old utility accounts (including power, gas, phone, and internet) sometimes entails unforeseen fees. You will receive initial deposits from such accounts, thankfully. But often late fees or premature closing fees may make that deposit smaller than you had hoped.

Once settled in your new home, you will need to open new accounts. Opening new utility accounts often means paying deposits, set-up fees, etc.

You can prepare for both kinds of fees by calling utility companies weeks before the move. This will ensure that your accounts are square before the actual moving date.

Sleeping and Eating During the Move

Depending on how far you are moving and how you plan to get there, the actual move might include several days of travel.

As you plan, budget for transportation (gas, airplane tickets, bus tickets, parking fees, etc.). Also consider accommodations: will you be staying in a hotel in the days between moving out of your old home and into your new home? Account for food as well. If your move will take several days, you may be eating out until you have a kitchen again.

Getting SettledChecklist

Driver’s license fees, plate registration, opening or closing bank accounts or gym contracts: these all have hidden costs. When making a move across state lines especially, you will need to update many of these day-to-day contracts. You will have time once established in your new home to take care of such items, but prepare your budget for these updates as well.

Replacing Odds and Ends

If you are making a big move, you might be leaving behind (or throwing away) everyday items. For instance, cleaning supplies, baking goods, and other small fixtures you have accumulated might get left in your old house. Some items might also get lost or damaged in the move. Choose a reliable moving company to avoid this as much as possible, but anticipate replacing some odds and ends.

The best secret to reducing the budget-related stress of moving is to prepare. You may encounter unexpected situations as you relocate. By keeping these hidden costs in mind, though, such unexpected situations won’t surprise you.

For more moving advice, explore some of Bekins’ other blog posts.

Stress Free Zone

7 Ways to De-stress During a Move

In 1967, two psychiatrists developed a scale for measuring stress. According to their research, different life changes create different levels of stress in our bodies. If these stress levels get too high, we are more prone to injury and illness.

One of the stressors that Holmes and Rahe identified is a change in residence.

Right alongside that stressor are others, like a change in schools, a change in marital status, and a change in work responsibilities.

A move in and of itself may not cause overwhelming stress. But chances are if you’re moving, you are probably also making some other significant life changes as well. Collectively, these changes can produce a storm of stressors.

You may not be able to control the life changes that come your way. But the good news is that managing the stress they create is possible. Simple de-stressing activities can help you keep calm and healthy amidst the packing and planning you’ll be conquering in the coming months.

Keep a regular exercise routine

True, you might be lifting lots of heavy things, carrying items up and down staircases, and scrubbing walls and windows as you get ready to move. But don’t neglect keeping a regular exercise routine. Thirty minutes a day can greatly reduce stress and anxiety, not to mention help you maintain the energy and strength you’ll need for the big move.

Get regular sleep

If you’re moving in the middle of a change in work, the only hours you have to organize, pack, and clean might be late at night.

It’s okay to work late, but remember that your mind and body will work best when they have proper sleep. Try to keep a consistent bedtime so you can get the most out of your waking hours.

Eat a balanced dietAhealthyfooditems

With all the hustle and bustle of moving, it is easy to let good eating go. But your body needs nutrients to manage stress and maintain health. Include fresh vegetables, fruits, and plenty of drinking water in your daily eating.

Take time to play

Go for a walk, play a board game, or cook your favorite meal. Taking time away from the stressors often gives new clarity and energy. You’ll find that when you come back to the tasks at hand, you’ll be much better equipped to manage problems.

Breathe

Practice breathing deeply for a few minutes each day. You might sit on the ground or on a chair. Close your eyes and focus on inhaling and exhaling. Play some soothing music in the background if that helps.

ChecklistMake a to-do list

When you start getting overwhelmed by how many things still need doing, one of the best ways to get that stress off your shoulders is to write it all down. Take fifteen minutes and a pencil and paper. List all the tasks you need to do, small and large.

Then prioritize the tasks. Which must you do today? Which must you do this week? Writing out upcoming tasks and assigning a time for you to do each one will make the work ahead seem much more doable.

Stay on track with this moving checklist and timeline.

Surround yourself with nature

With all the time our brains and eyes spend on screens, a little bit of nature can go a long way to de-stress. Buy a plant. Find a nearby park. Sit outside and watch clouds. Having a few minutes alone with your thoughts and with nature will leave you feeling refreshed and ready to tackle the stress of moving.Walking

Find a hobby

The act of creating can do wonders for our stress levels. Whether you’re a knitter, a painter, or a model car maker, losing yourself in a new (or forgotten) hobby can alleviate anxiety and help you regain perspective. Even setting aside fifteen minutes a day for your hobby will establish a healthy, consistent pattern that you’ll find yourself enjoying more and more.

Now that you have the tools to de-stress, check out some of Bekins’ other blog posts to get more tips for a smooth, manageable move.

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Eat, Throw Away or Donate? What to Do with Your Food Supply Before Moving

When you’re in the hustle and bustle of moving preparations, you probably spend a lot of time decluttering. You hold a garage sale to get rid of the heavy old bookshelf and treadmill you never use. You strategize the best way to pack your craft collection.

But have you thought much about your pantry?

If you’re like most Americans, you probably have a decent store of canned goods and other non perishables hanging around your kitchen. And that doesn’t even approach all the food you have in your refrigerator and freezer.

You don’t like the idea of throwing food away, but you don’t want to pack stacks of canned goods in the moving van either.

Moving day isn’t far off-so you need a manageable strategy right now.

Complete a Food InventoryFridge

While you may keep a careful inventory of our furniture, books, and electronic devices, you probably forget about your food storage. If you don’t really buy a lot of excess food, congratulations. But if you believe in emergency supplies, you’ll need to do some counting and sorting.

To stay organized, divide your list into the following categories:

  • Frozen foods (meat, vegetables, ice cream, frozen entrées, etc.)
  • Perishable, refrigerated items (dairy products, eggs, vegetables and fruits, and condiments)
  • Foods in glass bottles (bottled fruit, drinks, olive oil, spaghetti sauce, and similar items)
  • Canned items (vegetables, fruits, soup, and so forth)
  • Boxed items (grains, cereals, and the like)
  • Plastic containers (containers for bulk foods like nuts, pasta or rice; and bottled water)
  • Food supplies in fragile containers (flour in paper sacks, bread loaves in plastic bags, etc.)

Plan for Your New Space

The best way to decide what to keep, eat, or throw away is to look ahead at your new home. Will you have more or less cupboard space there? Do you want to build up a new food supply once you arrive, or would you rather have a month’s supply of food already in place?

By asking yourself these questions now, you can better envision a food plan between now and then. Here are a few possible scenarios that could happen once you move into your new home:

  • If your new home has a pantry closet in addition to your kitchen cupboards, you may want to take more food with you.
  • If you need to downsize for your new place, consider a better division between food supplies and dishes. If you have too much of one or the other, you should probably give some things away before you move.
  • If you have a large family that goes through food quickly, you may want to move more food items with you. But pay attention to food costs vs. the cost of shipping. This can help you decide if moving all those cases of soup is really the best strategy.

pantryEat from Your Pantry for a Few Weeks

How much of your food supply can you use in your current menus? Be creative. Enlist the help of family members to decide what foods you can eat in advance.

In particular, try to use up items in glass jars. Glass is harder to protect during a move, so the fewer glass containers you have on moving day, the better. Do you really need all those glass jars of freezer jam? Consider donating any items you can’t eat before you move to neighbors and friends.

Of course, you have to be realistic when eating from your pantry. You may still have to stop by the store for a couple fresh ingredients. But you may surprise yourself when you see how many meals you can make completely from pantry foods. Don’t forget to use foods from your freezer as well.

Finally, get rid of expired goods before moving day. If you do your part ahead of time, you’ll still have what you need when you arrive at your new home-but without the hassle and expense of moving food items you didn’t have to.

Donate Your Leftovers

moveforhunger.org

moveforhunger.org

The cost of your move is based on weight plus distance of the move. Ways to cut back on your weight would be to get rid of food. Rather than throwing away non-perishable food, Bekins along with Move For Hunger make it easier than ever to donate your food.

Bekins Van Lines is a founding member of Move For Hunger. Participating local agents will pick up the unwanted, non-perishable food items and deliver it to their local food banks in the area. Your donation of food will not only save you money on your move, but will help feed a person or family in need.

Need more fresh moving tips? Browse our blog for other smart, low stress strategies before the big day.