Category Archives: Moving Tips

Milit_Family

Permanent Change of Station: Tips for Surviving Your First Military Move

When you receive orders for your first permanent change of station, it can be hard to know where to start. Most importantly, you’ll want to take advantage of the available resources.

Before you worry about anything else, make sure you take advantage of the following entitlements:

  • Temporary Lodging Allowance. If you are moving overseas, you may ask for a temporary lodging allowance. This entitlement provides a lodging allowance for military members until they find permanent housing.
  • Temporary Lodging Expense. Like the allowance mentioned above, this expense covers lodging for military families. The main difference is that this is for members moving within the continental United States.
  • House Hunting Trip. Before your move, you will receive up to 10 days of temporary duty Military-Moving1leave. During this time, you can make a house hunting trip to your new station without paying a fee for leave.

Once you’ve taken advantage of these entitlements, you can start to plan the rest of your moving details.

Get In Touch with the Right Programs

Which relocation program you work with depends on your branch of military. Most often, you will need to contact the Transportation Management Office. This group will provide information on the coordination and reimbursement for your move.

If you have questions, you can also get in touch with your base transportation office. The name of this office varies among service branches:

  • Household Goods Shipping Office (Coast Guard)
  • Personal Property Shipping Office (Marine Corps and Navy)
  • Installation Transportation Office (Army)
  • Traffic Management Office (Air Force)
  • Joint Personal Property Shipping Office (Department of Defense)

The earlier you can make an appointment, the smoother your move will be. Once you’re familiar with the moving options available, you’ll be able to make some final decisions.

Make Preparations for Your Family

If your family is making the move as well, you’ll want to make additional preparations. For family_01this reason, most relocation programs provide family centers. This resource allows your family to become familiar with the new community. In preparing your family for the move, you can also do the following:

  • Request a sponsor. A sponsor from your destination provides extra support to your family. This individual can also prepare for the move by helping you determine which items to take.
  • Connect with employment assistance programs. Once you reach your destination, your spouse may be on the hunt for new employment opportunities. Your post or base may offer an employment assistance program to help with this step. Members of this program may also help your spouse apply for the Accredited Financial Counselor® certificate. Military spouses can earn this certificate while they provide financial guidance to other military families.

By taking advantage of these services and more, you ensure a smoother transition for your loved ones.

Seek Guidance from a Local Moving Company

Finally, you can make further preparations by contacting a local moving company. With so many programs available, this resource is sometimes overlooked by military families. While it may seem easier to have the military move you, there are a lot of advantages to opting for a Moving InDIY, Personally Procured Move. These advantages include the following:

  • Saved money. Rather than having the government move you, you can choose to receive 95 percent of what that move would cost. The advantage here is that you get to keep whatever money you have left over. So, by working with a moving company and taking advantage of discounts, you can actually make money on your move.
  • Increased control. Of course, another advantage will be greater control over your move. Rather than leaving all the decisions to the government, you can make those choices yourself.
  • Additional time. The other bonus will be your ability to create your own timeline. If you plan wisely, you may save time by procuring your own move.

When you connect with a local moving expert, he or she will be able to answer some of your pressing questions about relocating to a new base. Remember, the sooner you get started, the smoother your transition will be!

Fragile

Protect Your Treasures: Tips for Packing Your Collection Before a Move

When a woman took her family baseball card collection for appraisal, she discovered that saving something for sentimental value can yield big rewards. At the “Antiques Roadshow” taping in August 2014, an expert examined the baseball cards, which feature some of America’s earliest baseball players, big names for the Boston Red Stockings in the late 1800s.

Before the appraisal, the owner had turned down an offer of $5,000, suspecting the cards were worth much more-and she was glad she did. The appraiser valued the collection at over $1 million.

But, the sentimental value still trumps the monetary value. The woman has no plans to sell and become an instant millionaire.

Instead, she wants to keep the collection in the family for many more generations.

As a collector, you may understand her reluctance to sell. Whatever you collect, the collection has worth in your eyes not just because of what it’s worth but because of what it represents. When you have to move, you don’t even question whether your collection will move with you. You just wonder how you’ll pack it up so it arrives safely at your new house. If that’s a dilemma you face in the near future, use these tips to pack your collection right.

Fragile Items

Many collectors display their collections inside curio cabinets or other prominent locations. They want family and friends to see their special items. If collectors’ items are fragile, they want that observation to take place with minimal touching.

That principle applies when fragile collections follow their owners to new homes. Protect your too-easily-broken valuables with these suggestions:customer-service-billboard

Buy special moving boxes. Many moving companies or shipping stores sell special boxes for common fragile items. These boxes have dividers to cushion delicate collectibles in transit. These boxes commonly fit dishware, stemware, wine or framed photos or art.

Stock up on cushioned packing materials. People rarely have sufficient bubble wrap, newspaper, and packing peanuts when it comes time to put collections into boxes. Start saving these items as soon as you know you’re moving. You can also put out feelers around the neighborhood and on social media letting people know you’ll take packing materials they get from online orders. Many people throw these materials away, so they probably won’t mind giving them to you.

Mark boxes as “fragile.” This tip should almost go without saying, but you’d be surprised how many times people forget to mark some boxes as holding fragile cargo. Be meticulous about marking boxes. Write “fragile” on more than one side as well as the top. And while you’re at it, note which way is up to avoid damaging the items with tipping and flipping.

Another way to ensure your fragile collection arrives safely is to use professional movers. Movers take care with every box they pick up, transport, and set down, even boxes not marked as “fragile.” If using Bekins Van Lines, talk to your local agent about the precautions that will need to be taken to protect your collection.

Large Collections

Some collections are notable not just for the individual value of each item but for the total items in the collection. If you own 500 snow globes or 200 Madame Alexander dolls, you know what we mean.

The challenge with large collections becomes packing each item with the same care. You also have to gather sufficient packing material for each part. Try these tricks to pack large collections:

Use original boxes whenever possible. Many collectibles come in boxes with custom Styrofoam that fits perfectly around the item. If you still have that packaging, take advantage of its original purpose and put your items back inside for the move.

Pack boxes to a reasonable weight limit. With a large collection, it’s tempting to put as many items as you can in the least number of boxes necessary. But, as any book collector knows, LRjimWrapGlasthat can yield heavy boxes that are hard to lift and easy to drop. Limit most boxes to 30-40 pounds, if possible. Try to keep each box under 50 pounds.

Pay for professional packing services. You might not have time to pack every item in your collection personally. You have a lot to handle during a move, so ask your mover about professional packing services. Trained movers will handle your items with care, so you won’t have to oversee the packing process.

Oddly-Sized Items

Are you a cinema buff who owns original props from your favorite film franchise? Are you bringing your collection of igneous rocks to your new home? Unique, organic, and oddly-shaped collectibles like these rarely come with original packaging to simplify the moving process.

If your collection has strange or one-of-a-kind items, first decide if you want to personally move the ones you value most. You might experience less worry if you bring great-grandpa’s phonograph in your car instead of packing it with everything else.

Next, get an estimate on the price of custom-fit foam packing. The extra expense might be justified on your favorite pieces. Plus, you’ll always have it whenever you need to transport the item later.

Finally, ask a professional moving company how they’d recommend packing unique items. Decide whether you feel comfortable packing it yourself. If not, put your collection in the hands of the pros. Remember, a little extra moving expense is minor compared to the cost of trying to repair or replace a rare collectible.

However you decide to pack your collection, using these tips will help your priceless items arrive at your new home safely.

Relying on professional packing and moving services can alleviate your worries about your collection and allow you to concentrate your energy on other moving considerations.

Moving while Pregnant

7 Tips for Moving While Pregnant

Moving is not an easy task and, if you’re pregnant, it becomes even more difficult. Whether you’re moving across the country or down the street, the packing and stress could leave you with anything from back pains to swollen ankles. Use these tips to avoid the strain and plan a successful, problem-free move for you and your baby.

  1. Find a Babysitter

Before you move, you will need to find a childcare provider in your new area. Looking beforehand will reduce stress and give you enough time to thoroughly search for the perfect person for the job. Use friend references and local ads to start the interviewing process early.

Once you find someone you feel comfortable with, have the person watch your children on moving day. This will act as a test run for the new babysitter and give you a chance to organize and pack without the distraction of your little ones.

If everything goes well with the new babysitter on moving day, you will have someone you can call when the baby comes.Pregnant Bloggin

  1. Start to Pack Early

If you can, start to pack six to eight weeks before moving day. Set a goal to pack two boxes a day and start with items you won’t need within the next few weeks.

Be extra careful when moving items as pregnancy shifts your center of balance. Your hormones also loosen ligaments, which can put extra pressure on joints. To avoid straining your back, place boxes on tables and countertops so you won’t need to bend all the way over to put items in them.

You may also want to hold a packing party with your family and friends. This will reduce the stress on you and allow you to spend quality time together.

  1. Arrange a New Doctor

Closer to the move, you will need to find a doctor in your new area. Talk to your current doctor and ask if he or she has any suggestions for a doctor you may want to contact. You can also look online for doctor reviews to help you narrow your search.

Find a doctor who is covered by your health insurance network and has high approval scores from patients. Once you find the right doctor, have your current doctor’s office transfer your prenatal and medical records to the new hospital.

  1. Pack a Personal Moving-Day Bag

You may have specific items that you like to have with you during your pregnancy. On moving day, pack a bag with any prescriptions, food, lotion, or books that will keep you calm and organized. Pack enough to last you at least a few days while you’re in between homes. These items will reduce stress and help you avoid digging through boxes trying to find your needed prescriptions.

If you’re in your last trimester, keep your hospital bag packed and ready to go. You will need all those items on-hand just in case the baby comes early.

  1. Ask For Help

Moving PregnantAs you go through moving while pregnant, never hesitate to ask for help. You shouldn’t risk your baby because you’re afraid to ask. Even though you may not normally ask for help, consider pregnancy an exception. On the same note, if your friends or family offer help, feel free to accept.

  1. Be Cautious Around Chemicals

Most moves involve deep cleaning and/or painting the old or new house. Be extra cautious around strong chemicals. Use nontoxic cleaning products such as white distilled vinegar or baking soda. If someone else paints or cleans for you, avoid the areas where you can smell these chemicals.

  1. Expect the Unexpected

Pregnancy is an emotional time. To avoid unnecessary stress expect the unexpected. Things may go wrong – deliveries may not come on time and things may break. If things do go wrong, don’t feel bad if you feel overwhelmed, cranky, or weepy. You may need to take a few moments to yourself to cry and then feel better afterword. Take a break and try to think of the positive.

Your number one goal through the moving process should be to take care of yourself and the baby. Drink plenty of water, rest if you feel dizzy, and stay out of the hot sun. You should also consider hiring a moving company to handle the heavy objects.

Now that you know the basics of moving while pregnant, check out our other blogs for more moving tips and tricks.

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3 Steps to Organizing a Profitable Moving Day Sale

Over the years, you have probably accumulated everything from childhood keepsakes to old high school textbooks that you’ll never use again. Maybe you forgot to get rid of your old ski equipment that you only used once.

Now as you get ready to move, you realize it’ll cost a pretty penny to transport all of these items to your new home. Instead of throwing your things away, consider holding a moving sale. This will reduce the amount of stuff you have to move and help you make money for the rest of the moving process.

If you want to organize and host a profitable moving sale, you will need to create a thorough plan first. Follow these moving sale tips to make sure your sale goes problem-free.

Organize Your Items

Before you can sell items, you will need to find them. Look through your attic, basement, garage and closets to find items in good, sellable condition. Once you have the items you want to sell, choose an area in your home where you can organize these items. Then separate items into piles according to their functions. For instance, you can have a pile for your kitchenware and another pile for children’s toys.

Here is a list of possible items you may want to sell:

  • Souvenirs with no sentimental value
  • Magazines or posters
  • Unused CD’s
  • Children’s shoes and clothesgarage-sale-woman
  • Old textbooks
  • Sports equipment
  • Furniture

Don’t get overzealous and throw away items that have sentimental value to you and your family. Some items merit the cost of relocation.

After you have organized the items into categories, make a list of items you plan to sell and what you’ll charge for each item. This price list will help you in case stickers fall off during the actual moving sale.

If you’re computer savvy, consider selling high-priced items on eBay. You can sell these pieces faster and possibly make more money. Selling on eBay does require some extra efforts. You will need to take pictures, write descriptions and ship the items. However, you may make more using this method.

Schedule and Advertise the Day

If you don’t plan to move immediately, schedule your moving sale on a Saturday near the first half of the month. People are more likely to go shopping after they receive their paycheck at the beginning of the month. You should also hold the sale in the morning so you have all day to sell your items. Make sure you choose a day that has good weather forecasted.

After you’ve set a time and date, spread the word. Use newspapers and signs to lead people to your home. You can also advertise on the internet through local news outlets and your personal social media accounts.

yard-sale-imageDisplay Items Systematically

People like organized places, so try and keep your moving sale as organized as possible. Set items with similar uses next to each other. This will help your customers find items they need without having to dig through boxes or missing the items altogether.

Set tables out and place smaller objects in the front and larger objects in the back. You should also hang pictures and clothes. When people can look through items freely, they’ll see and buy more. Clearly designate prices. Often people don’t want to ask “how much does this cost” more than once. So make sure each of your items have a visible price tag.

Creating a clean, welcoming atmosphere will help you sell more. Therefore, create colorful signs, play music, and hang balloons. This atmosphere will help attract and maintain visitors as they look through your items.

Once you have your moving sale set up, sit back and let the people come. You should also consider hiring a moving company with the extra money you earn to make the moving process that much easier.

Senior Moving

A Stress-Free Guide to Moving Elderly Parents

As your parents grow older, you may see them begin to struggle living day-to-day. Perhaps they have begun to miss bill payments or have fallen and broken a hip. They may need increased care after developing Alzheimer’s or dementia. At some point, you will need to move them into a safer living environment.

Where will they live? Initially you may consider your home. However, this decision is a major life choice and deserves some serious discussion from you, them, and the rest of your family. Here are some simple things you can do to make the moving process easier:

Coming to the Same Conclusion

Your parents may feel emotionally connected to their home. Expect apprehension when you first bring up moving. They will need time to ponder and accept the idea. Many times seniors feel that moving means losing control of their lives. To help them transition, explain that their opinion matters and that they have a say in where they live. Giving them time to come to the same conclusion as you will help them feel more confident and less distressed.

Talk with your parents at a family meeting with their loved ones. This will give everyone the opportunity to share his or her opinions and views. Active communication in the family will also build a better support system for your parents.

Deciding on Living Arrangements

During this meeting, discuss the level of care your parents will need in their new home. They may require constant supervision and assistance with daily living activities. Most of the time, seniors movingsenior’s care becomes more challenging over time. Consider speaking with a social worker for advice. They can provide valuable suggestions and insight on required care and living arrangements.

The housing situation you choose for your parents will depend on needed care, available facilities, location, and finances.

Create a list of pros and cons for each housing option in your area. Include the distance to relatives as this may cause concern among siblings. Often, family members who live closer have more opportunities to get involved with parents’ care. It’s essential to create an open dialogue with your family and come to an agreement on living conditions.

Understand that your parents have the final say during the decision-making. After all, the living arrangement will ultimately affect them the most.

Before you all decide on a living arrangement, visit the facility. This will help your parents get a feel for the environment, which may play a role into their decision. Take notes on how the employees interact with residents, what activities they provide, and transportation arrangements. You can also research online reviews from past guests.

Sorting Belongings

Most seniors have lived in their homes for many years, which means they have a lot of stuff to sort througsenior_downsizingh. Before you start to pack, go through your parents’ home and organize their belongings. Organize possessions into piles you’re keeping, donating, throwing away, and preserving as keepsakes.

Keep in mind the emotional state of your parents as you go through their things. Allow them time to decide which pile to put their belongings in and reminisce as you sort. Their possessions are more than objects-they’re memories.

As you organize, picture where possessions will go in their new house. How much room do they have? Where will the furniture go? Create a model of the home on paper to help you envision what their new living arrangement will look like.

Hiring a Moving Company

Booking a moving company will help ease the stress on you and your parents. In fact, your parents may feel more comfortable talking with a subjective third party than speaking with their children. Moving companies who specialize in moving seniors will offer comfort to the family. They also take on the burden of lifting heavy objects and ultimately make the process smoother for everyone.

You may want to consider having them pack belongings. They have the tools and knowledge to ensure valuables remain intact.

This allows you to focus on your parents as they transition to their new home.

Cleaning

Even if you hire a moving company, you will still need to clean the home. Whether you plan to rent, sell, or pass the home to a relative, have the entire family come and help. Also, repair any damages now to avoid the problems getting worse. These repairs will prevent rentpianoers or new owners from claiming fake damages.

Settling In

Your parents may need days, weeks, or months to adjust to the new living arrangements. Check in with them often to make sure they feel safe and comfortable. Every person reacts to moving differently. Some feel relief from not having to take of their home. Others feel hesitant to make friends. Most will feel some loss from the life change. Give your parents plenty of family support during this stage. Who knows, they may end up saying, “Why didn’t I do this a long time ago?”

Take the moving process slowly to ensure you and your parents have a smooth transition.

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An Introvert’s Guide to Making Friends in a New Place

After a big move to a new city, you suddenly find yourself with no one to hang out with. The friends you grew up with live many miles away and you don’t have high school or a college campus to force you to interact with others.

Every single adult who moves to a new town faces the age-old problem of how to make friends. Even couples might find themselves wishing for other people’s company. As an introvert in a new place, try these tips to meet some people and build a new support system.

Don’t Retreat

If you value your alone time, you might feel tempted to back away from invitations to social gatherings in your new city. Even if you just want to try a new restaurant, you order the food to go and take it back to your place.

Resist the urge for solitude. If you want to make friends, then make this a time of putting yourself out there, even if it’s by yourself at first. Go to movies, bars, coffee shops, and restaurants and open yourself up to conversations with strangers. Even if you don’t make friends, you’ll hear some cool stories.

Meeting New NeighborsSay You’re New in Town

When you meet people around the city, always tell them you’re new in town. This opens the door for them to tell you about local places to check out and events to attend. This will also encourage them to include you in their social circles and invite you to get-togethers.

Own your rookie status and allow people to act extra friendly and inclusive.

Look for Common Interests

Start looking for friends in fun places. If you love theater, join a group of play-goers. If you knit a mean scarf, find a club in your area. When you meet up with these groups for the first time, exercise your “new in town” line and tell them you’re trying to make friends.

Not only will clubs and organizations bring you together with lots of people, but you can go in knowing these people share your interests. This gives you easy topics of conversation and good ways to connect with others.

Make Friends with Coworkers

You easily made friends in high school and college because you had no choice but to spend endless hours with your classmates. The adult version of school is work. Befriend a few of your coworkers and start inviting them to after-work events.

Although you don’t have a guarantee your coworkers share your interests, they will understand your workday rants. Making friends with coworkers can also have networking benefits and make your job more interesting.

Make Plans

To build friendships, you have to make time commitments. When you meet new people, make concrete plans about when you’ll hang out with them and what you’ll do. Plans add structure to your interactions and help you bond with others.

You don’t have to develop complex itineraries. You can make a plan to hang out at youKeep Calm Postersr place and watch sappy movies. Just establish a specific time and place to have it happen.

Accept Invitations

A new city presents a perfect opportunity to become a self-actualized “yes person.” Say yes to almost anything potential friends invite you to. Even if you wouldn’t normally spend hours outdoors during wintertime, say yes to that ice fishing trip. Even if you don’t usually like scones, attend that tea party.

Build on What You Have

After you’ve made a few connections and established a small social circle, expand it based on the people you’ve met. Start introducing yourself to friends of friends. If someone you know says their good friend likes the same band you do, suggest you all go to the concert together.

Throw a Party

Don’t count on other people to do all the inviting. Throw a party and invite everyone you’ve made connections with. You don’t even have to host an event at your house-you can easily make a group reservation at a restaurant or round everyone up for a pub crawl.

Enlist Technology

If you’d rather meet people from your living room, the internet has made it possible. Online isn’t just for dating anymore. Many apps exist to bring people together as friends. Use a service such as Meetup to find groups of people in your area with similar interests and hang out with them.

Dating sites have their place too. If you’re single, find a site you like and start talking by sending messages. Even if you don’t meet a new significant other, you might meet some good friends.

Follow Up

After parties or other events with people you meet, follow up with them. Friend them on Facebook, follow them on Twitter, tag them in photos. Make social media work to your benefit and bring you closer to others.

Making friends in a new city doesn’t have to be hard. Use these tips to establish a social circle and build meaningful relationships.

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Decorating Your New Place with Your Old Decorations

When you first step into your new place, you may struggle to picture this house as your home. You can make this transition easier by decorating your new space. Adding small details in the room, like family pictures and flowers, will help everyone feel more comfortable.

You may want to grab your wallet and head to the furniture store because you think a new place deserves new stuff. However, decorating doesn’t have to cost a fortune. Use your old decorations for a more affordable solution. Not only will decorations make your new house look better, but they’ll help your kids feel more at home as well.

Below, we’ve listed some ways you can incorporate your old décor into your new place.

Assess What You Have

a box full of clothes to be donated.Before you pack up to leave, assess what furniture and décor you have. Keep in mind that you don’t have to keep everything.

Decide what you really want in your new place. This will save you from packing and transferring junk you don’t need.

As a rule of thumb, try and get rid of 25% of your old stuff. Take this opportunity to rid yourself of faulty appliances in the garage that you haven’t used in years. Auction your things off on eBay or have a garage sale. You may make a few extra bucks on decorations you would never use. Consider this move a fresh start.

Sketch a Floor Plan

Now that you know what you have, make a plan for your new home. Have fun with this step by choosing color pallets for each room. Decide where furniture will go and what child will have which room. If you want to go in-depth, visit the new place and take measurements. This way, you’ll know exactly what furniture will fit in what room.

Consider using a floor-planning program on the internet. Most are easy to use and will help you visualize the result.

Don’t forget to keep portion, balance, and scale in mind. Avoid crowding too many oversized furniture pieces into a small space.

Consider the dimensions and ceiling height to determine how much you can comfortably fit into the room. Don’t put a small dining table and picture into a large room with high ceilings or large furniture into a small room. The space will come off awkward and unsatisfying.

Planning will also help you stay organized as you pack. Mark boxes with which room they will occupy in the new house.

Start with Your Bedroom

Nothing beats sinking into a soft bed after a long day of organizing and unpacking. Start your decorating hiatus with your bedroom. This will give you a beautiful place to retreat to after working hard all day.

Most homeowners have at least a bed and dresser to incorporate into their new place. Next, choose a bedspread to mix and match with pictures and décor.

Don’t limit the possibilities with décor you previously had in your bedroom. Use décor from the entire house. If you have a flexible budget, consider painting the walls to match your bedding. Or maybe you want to keep the wall paint the same and buy new bedding. Try to plan these details before you buy anything. Planning will save you time and money.

Choose Small Details to Update

Small details can make a big difference. Rather than demolishing an entire room and

Photo credit: cuteandcompany.com

Photo credit: cuteandcompany.com

starting from scratch, decide on one or two small details to update. For instance, freshen kitchen cabinets with paint rather than replacing them. You can also update a bathroom by painting the cabinets or replacing a light fixture.

Replacing light bulbs with less “yellow” bulbs is another way to update a space. This small detail can brighten a room and make it feel newer.

Unify the Room with Color

If you move into an older home with furniture from the 1960s, don’t worry. You can easily unify the room by incorporating similar colors in the space. For instance, imagine you have a chair that has a small fabric detail that could match your main room color. You can draw attention to that small detail by painting a wall a similar color. Suddenly that chair matches the rest of the room.

Photo credit: http://denverdisco.com/collections-of-color-schemes-ideas-for-living-rooms/color-schemes-for-living-rooms-living-room-color-schemes-for-inspirational-divine-living-room-ideas-for-remodeling-your-living-room-5

Photo credit: http://denverdisco.com/collections-of-color-schemes-ideas-for-living-rooms/color-schemes-for-living-rooms-living-room-color-schemes-for-inspirational-divine-living-room-ideas-for-remodeling-your-living-room-5

You can use that same principle by matching colors with a rug, curtain, or accessory. Decide the room color from a décor item that you love.

Once you have chosen a main color, let the rest of the design branch from that color. Use neutral colored furniture around the room as a foundation. Then use your main color in accessories. The neutral furniture provides consistency if you ever want to change the main color of the room. And if you use this strategy, you won’t spend more money replacing or painting furniture.

Don’t stress about using the exact same color in the space. Retail stores would love if you bought an expensive bedroom set that matches exactly, but you don’t have to. You cannot go wrong as long as most of the hues in the room match. Use your previous décor to bring your personality to the space.

Now that you know the basics to make your house a home, check out our other blogs for more moving tips.

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9 Reasons Relocating in the Winter is the Right Move

With some preparation, winter might be the easiest and cheapest time to move. Plus, who wants to wait until the busy spring and summer months to relocate? Here are the top 10 reasons to consider moving in the winter: 

Why You Should Move in the Winter

    • Moving in the winter can save you money when hiring a moving company. Most household moving companies have cheaper rates compared to the peakCoupon - Copy moving months (May to September). Bekins currently offers This is moving. Relocation Prograwhere you can save $150 and receive other service guarantees on your upcoming move.
    • Movers are more flexible with dates in the winter. You may not need to give as much notice or you may even get your household goods quicker.
    • Weather permitting, travel can be quicker due to the lack of cars and construction on the roads.
    • There are less homes on the market during the winter and sellers often are eager to move from their residences.
    • There can be fewer buyers during the winter because more people prefer to move in the warmer months.
    • Due to a decrease in volume during the winter, mortgage lenders usually have fewer loans and less paperwork to process.
    • Due to the slower market, real estate professionals have more time to devote to your search for a new home.
    • Lenders may forgo certain fees to stay busy in the off-season.
    • Because landlords want to fill vacant apartments and homes in the winter, they are more likely to entice you to move with bonus offers, lower rent or a smaller deposit.

To learn more about how to organize a winter move and how to make your move as easy and stress-free as it can possibly be, contact Bekins for a free moving quote. Don’t allow the thought of bad weather to interfere with making the right move!

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Moving? How to Help Kids Adjust to a New Community

Moving can be exciting and exhilarating for people of all ages. Moving brings the promise of a fresh start, interesting places and faces, and new adventures.

But moving also means leaving friends, familiar places, and sights of home behind. While leaving these things behind is hard for adults, children and teenagers often experience additional difficulty. Children may feel intimidated by the thought of living in a new town, attending a new school, and making new friends.

Moving doesn’t have to be scary or intimidating though. Use the tips below to help your kids adjust to a new community.

Make Special Considerations for Children of Different Ages

Your children’s ages and personalities affect how they will respond to moving. While one of your children might adapt easily to a new place, another might need more help and emotional support to make the adjustment. Keep the following in mind:

  • Infants, toddlers, and preschoolers will not understand the meaning and complexity of a move. They don’t interact with very many people outside of the home, and they don’t experience change very often. Young children thrive on predictably, so try to keep their routines as normal as possible once you’ve moved.
  • Elementary school-aged children want to fit in with their peers. As a result, your children might feel scared about living in a new community. Focus on the excitement of attending nervous-boy-back-to-schoola new school and meeting new people. Tell them about a person or group of people, such as immigrants, who overcame their fears to come to exciting new places.
  • Although teens are old enough to understand the need to move, they might resist change. Teens may feel like they can’t establish valuable friendships in a new community, which might make it hard for them to transition into a new school. Moving is especially hard on teens who participate in sports or other extracurricular activities. To help ease your teens’ worry, research the programs in your new town. Does the high school have a state championship swimming team? Is there a state-of-the-art performance hall?

You have to focus on the positive to help kids transition to a new. Listen to their questions and concerns, and reassure them that they have things to look forward to.

Provide Support After the Move

The first few months in a new town prove volatile for many children, so pay extra attention to their emotional needs. Here are a few ways you can provide emotional support as your children settle into a new community:

  • Explore your new community. Visiting nearby parks and finding the best local restaurants can help your whole family feel more at home.

    Teenagers Basketball

    Photo credit: USNews.com

  • Find ways for your children to get involved in the new community. If your children participated in music or drama clubs in your former town, help them get involved in the same activities in your new town.
  • Encourage your children to express their feelings. Many children want to know that they have a friend and confidant who understands what they’re going through. You can be that confidant. Listen carefully and intently as your children vent their frustrations. Don’t get short with them, as this can make them feel even more insecure.

Set an Example for Your Children

Children of all ages take cues from their parents, especially in new or scary situations. As you settle into your new community, model the kind of behavior and attitude you want your children to adopt. For example:

  • Socialize with families in your new neighborhood. If you encourage your kids to get involved in the community but never leave the house, your children might take this is as a sign that they don’t need to branch out. Invite your neighbors and their children over for a dessert night. This will allow your children to meet new people in a nChildrenon-threatening setting.
  • Stay up-to-date on events at school and in the community. The more you know and learn about your new community, the more your children will feel at home. On the other hand, the less you know about the community, the less likely your children are to embrace their new surroundings.
  • Don’t complain about your new house or community in front of your kids. Chances are, you’ll feel frustrated or stressed about unpacking and settling into a new home. Try not to let your children see this frustration. If they hear you badmouthing your new community, they might do the same. This makes it harder for them to settle in.

Adjusting to a new community doesn’t have to be stressful or scary for you or your children. Focus on the positive aspects of the new community. Provide outlets from your children to vent their feelings and frustration. Set an example for them to look to as they adjust. By helping them feel at home in a new community, you’ll be able to enjoy your new adventure that much more.

Sweet winter home

7 Tips to Make Your Winter Move Easier

Whether you finally found your dream home, or your job transferred you to a new location, moving in winter offers a lot of benefits. Winter is the off season for many companies, so you may enjoy better rates and more flexible moving dates. And in the colder seasons, roads tend to have less traffic, resulting in shorter, faster drives.

However, moving in winter also has its shortcomings. Poor weather and icy roads turn an otherwise safe journey into a harrowing experience. Fortunately, you can make the trip easier with these cold-weather tips.

1. Check the Weather

HeadlightsAs you pack and prep for the upcoming move, periodically check weather reports. Schedule your moving day during a bout of warmer weather, but give yourself a range of acceptable moving days in case the weather turns dangerous.

Even if the weather is supposed to be clear on your moving day, stay ready to call off the move at a moment’s notice. Weather can prove fickle, especially in Indiana. You’ll do better to postpone your moving trip in favor of better conditions than to work in the ice and the cold.

2. Keep Winter Supplies on Hand

Even if you plan to move to a warmer climate, you’ll want to keep your winter gear on hand while you move. Items such as a snow shovel, ice scraper, and salt will help you clear a path safely through the snow, while winter clothing such as heavier coats, hats, and gloves will help you stay warm while you move.

As you dress for your move, layer your clothing. Layers keep warm air from escaping and provide better insulation. This will keep you warmer during colder conditions. And since you may be moving heavier boxes and working harder, the layers enable you to shed unnecessary clothing to prevent overheating.

3. Clear Snow from Walkways

Moving boxes, appliances, and furniture is hard enough. You don’t want to have to deal with slip and falls on top of your move.

Use your snow shovel to clear a path through the driveway, sidewalk, and any other places Clear the Walkwaysyou and your crew will move consistently. Use salt to melt the ice faster and sand to provide traction.

If you hire a moving company to help you, make sure the company has a liability and protection plan in place. This will ensure that both the movers and your items have coverage in the case of an accident. If someone slips and falls on the sidewalk, you won’t have to worry about paying for medical coverage or for replacing your glassware.

4. Use Cardboard and Sheeting to Protect Floors

Even if you do a careful job clearing ice and snow from your driveway, chances are likely that you’ll track some of the slush into your home. The water, mud, and other debris can soak into and damage your carpet, and as a result, you may have to spend more time cleaning your home before you lock up.

Additionally, icy water on tile or wood floors poses a safety risk for you and your movers. The slick surface combined with limited visibility from heavy furniture create the perfect setup for an injury.

You can keep your flooring and your team safe by laying cardboard and sheeting near the entryways and other areas that see a lot of foot traffic on moving day. Keep towels near the front door to dry off dolly wheels and other moving equipment.

5. Board Your Pets

While you’ll want to take your beloved Fluffy along for the move, you don’t want your furry friend to frolic underfoot during the moving process. With multiple people traveling in and out of your home, someone might step on a paw or tail. Or in the excitement of the day’s events, your pet might slip out the door unnoticed.

Rather than spending hours tending to a pet’s injury or searching for a missing pet, take your pet to a local animal boarding facility. If you have a tight budget, consider asking your neighbor to watch your dog or cat for a few hours while you move.

6. Stay Warm with Hot Drinks

Constant changes between the warmth of your house anCup-of-black-coffeed the cold air from the outside take a toll on your body. While you might not immediately notice your dehydration, you may notice that it’s easier to become fatigued while moving heavier items.

Do your body a favor by drinking regularly while you move. If cold water sounds unpleasant in the chilly weather, opt for warmer drinks like hot cocoa, cider, or tea. Don’t forget to offer some to your moving team-they’ll likely appreciate it!

7. Call the Professionals

If you have a large family and a group of friendly neighbors to help you during the move, you may feel tempted to save money and pack your items yourself. However, not everyone is equipped to handle cold weather ventures, and this increases the risk of injury to you, your family, and your items.

When moving in winter, you’ll have better success transporting your valuables if you call on a professional moving team. With the right moving company, you can move your items quickly and safely. Don’t hesitate to ask professionals to assist you in your next winter move-with these tips, you’ll be out of your old home and into your new home in almost no time!