Category Archives: Moving Tips

DSCF0239

Corporate Relocation Terms You Should Know

Even if you’ve had experience with corporate relocations in the past, you need to brush up on jargon and processes. After all, relocation companies and van lines will use specific terms to describe and prepare you for the move.

Your understanding of these terms can make the relocation process smoother, so take some time to read through the definitions below. You’ll be glad you did so you know exactly what’s going on and what to expect from each stage of the process.

Common Terms Defined

  1. Relocation Package: Materials and information related to the relocation destination. This package provides a basic foundation for your understanding of the new location. Companies may offer specific packages, including the following options:
  • Full pack/unpack
  • Childcare
  • Home finding/buying
  • Elder care
  • Auto transfers
  • Home sale service
  • Lodging
  • Spousal support
  • Storage
  • Temporary housing
  • Expenses
  1. Intrastate and Interstate: The former refers to moves within the same state, but outside the 30-mile local move limit. The latter means the move takes place across state lines.
  2. Cartons: Boxes in various shapes and sizes provided by your chosen moving carrier for the transport of your items.A moving agent greeting a customer.
  3. Moving Coordinator/Consultant: The employee your carrier provides as your single point of contact. From origin to destination, your moving coordinator will contact movers, help you make decisions, and contract any additional services.
  4. Survey: An initial estimate of moving charges conducted by an agent. Usually conducted at the site of origin through visual and inventory checks.
  5. Agent: Carrier employee with authority to act on behalf of the carrier in booking and various other services.
  6. Booking Agent: Carrier employee responsible for accepting and registering your order date and time. Can also double as the origin or destination agent.
  7. Destination Agent: Carrier employee designated to provide assistance and information at your destination.
  8. Origin Agent: Carrier employee designated to assist in readying the shipment and providing information at origin.
  9. Accessorial Charges: Charges such as packing, appliance service, or unpacking in addition to basic freight and transportation costs.
  10. Appliance Service: Preparing large electrical home appliances to ready them for safe shipment.
  11. Moving InShuttle: A smaller truck used to load belongings when a full-sized moving van won’t fit at your origin location. Need for and use of a shuttle usually results in additional costs.
  12. Bill of Lading: Your receipt for services and transport contract. Your signature will acknowledge the release of all goods and items to your carrier at the agreed-upon price.
  13. Valuation Coverage: The liability of household goods carriers operating in interstate commerce (moving from one state to another) is based upon the customer’s declaration of value made prior to the time the shipment is loaded.
  14. Weight Ticket: Statement of van weight while empty and then following shipment loading. This weight ticket helps calculate the total cost of your freight bill.
  15. Storage in Transit (SIT): Temporary storage provided by your carrier warehouse, pending further transport at a later date. If service exceeds 180 calendar days, your shipment falls under the ruling of local warehouse organizers.
  16. Tariff: A publication with carrier rules, rates, regulations, and services available for your move.
  17. Third-Party Service: Any service performed by someone outside your original carrier by your request. Also non-carrier affiliates performing services because of a state, federal, or local law.
  18. Unpacking: An example of additional service you may request. Involves carrier employees removing your items from cartons and placing them on a flat surface while disposing of packing materials. Unpacking services happen upon delivery unless otherwise requested.

Knowledge Is Power

With a basic understanding of the above terms, you can go forward in your move with confidence. Consult your employer and moving company regarding various relocation packages and what perks you can expect.

Potted plants

Moving your Plants to your new Home

If you garden at all-anything from a small succulent in your kitchen window to a full-blown vegetable garden in your backyard you put a lot of time, effort, and care into growing your plants. Because of the hard work you’ve put into them, it may be difficult to leave your plants behind.

Movers typically don’t transport plants because of state regulations and extreme temperature and lack of sunlight in the truck can be fatal. Double check with your local Bekins agents before you pack your plants. After you make sure the place you’re moving to has the right climate and soil for your plants, you can easily pack them up and move them yourself.

Here are a few different common plants and how to best move them.

Perennials/Grasses

First, trim down bigger, sturdier plants to about 6-12 inches. This makes them easier to

gardenguides.com

gardenguides.com

move, it encourages regrowth when you replant them, and it’s actually healthier for the plant. If you leave lots of stems, leaves, or flowers, it can stress out the plant because it’s trying to keep so much more of itself alive.

After trimming down the plants, dig them up-making sure to keep a lot of dirt around the roots-and put them in paper bags.

Make sure you’re using paper bags instead of plastic so the plants can still breathe. If you have to use plastic, poke some holes in it. The plants should be fine for a couple of weeks as long as they don’t get too hot or dry. Just make sure they’re in the shade during the move.

Potted Plants

The first thing to do is to make sure that you’re not moving your potted plants in nice ceramic pots-you don’t want those to break on the road. Move the plants to plastic pots a couple weeks before the move to give them a chance to get used to the new pots. Potted PlantA couple days before the move, water the plants; not too much, not too little. You don’t want them drying out, but you also don’t want them molding.

Next, put the plants in boxes and make sure they’re snug. You can stuff paper or bubble wrap around the pots to make sure they don’t get jostled around. If possible, keep the top of the boxes open to ensure they don’t get crushed by something else.

Also, don’t forget: plenty of your outdoor plants can move to pots. Things like herbs are commonly grown in pots. As long as you give them enough time to readjust to the pots before the move, they should be perfectly fine to travel.

Vegetables

You have two options here, and your choice depends on your space and resources. Your first option is to dig up the entire plant and replant it in a large bucket, such as a five gallon bucket used for food storage. These buckets should sit in your personal vehicle.

Tomato plantThe second option is to cut the plant and put the cutting in a floral tube, making sure it stays moist by covering it with wet paper towels. If you don’t have a floral tube, you can use a potato soaked in water. This method is easier and safer than trying to relocate an entire tomato plant.

When you get to your new home, replant the plants right away. The less time they spend in limbo, the better. Keep in mind that your perennials and vegetables might not look quite as large and beautiful as they did before the move, at least for a while. If they stayed dormant during the move, they can put their energy into root growth once they’re replanted.

If you use these tips to move your plants, next year they should be big and beautiful again-you just have to give them time to recover.

Baby Relocating

Moving with your Infant: 7 Ways to make it Safe & Easy

Have an infant but need to relocate?

Don’t worry. You can achieve a safe and easy move even with your small child in tow. From advanced planning to packing and basic moving tips, the following guide covers everything you need to complete your move with a happy, healthy, and cared-for baby.

Before the Move

Advanced planning is an absolute must when you have an infant. In addition to your regular moving to-dos, add these items to your list:

  1. Create a Meal Plan

Packing boxes and organizing transportation is no easy feat. You might struggle to find time to feed your baby, let alone time to feed yourself. So before your move, take the time to plan a few simple meals to keep up your energy levels. Stick with simple foods you can take on the go, like sandwiches and trail mix.

  1. Book a Babysitter

You and your significant other can take turns packing and watching the baby, but you’ll Moving with a baby 2definitely need help on moving day. You don’t want to worry about your child crawling under foot or crying unnoticed in the corner as you load boxes into the truck.

So hire a professional service, or ask a friend or family member help. Make sure your sitter knows the right date and time, and give plenty of advanced notice. If you worry your go-to sitter might not be available, ask a back-up babysitter to help, just in case.

  1. Find a Pediatrician

Your baby could get sick before, en route, or once you’ve arrived at your new place. To avoid a stressful situation, find a good pediatrician before your move. Ask around, read reviews, and visit your child’s new doctor.

Also, keep copies of your child’s medical records on hand, or mail them in advance to the pediatrician. This way you can keep your child up-to-date on his or her immunizations despite the move.

During the Move

Now that you’ve planned your entire move, it’s time to prepare you and your baby for the official moving day.

  1. Put Together aMoving In Travel Case of Baby Essentials

Think everything you use to care for your baby day and a night. Since moving services may deliver your items before or after you arrive, you’ll want to keep certain essentials with you. This could include:

  • Diapers and wipes
  • Diaper rash ointment
  • Changing pad
  • Changes of clothes
  • Toys and snacks
  • Plenty of baby food
  • First-aid kit
  • Plastic bags for trash
  • Stroller
  • Portable crib
  • One or two blankets
  • Sunscreen

Although packing these items can sometimes seem look more hassle than its worth, you’ll be happy you have them during an emergency.

  1. Take Extra Time En Route

If you are traveling to your new home via road trip or plane, realize that it will take extra time when you have an infant. Plan for frequent stops along the way for feeding, bathroom, or just to take a break.

Bring a noisemaker or recorded sounds that soothe your baby during the trip.

After the Move

Congratulations! You made it through the journey to your new hoSmallerme. But you’re not finished yet.

  1. Enjoy Your First Meal in Your New Home

Upon arrival, plan for an easy takeout meal on the kitchen floor. You can turn this into a fun picnic by spreading a blanket out and taking your meal together with some paper napkins.

  1. Catch Up on Your Sleep

After you’ve eaten and fed your infant, take a few minutes to unpack your basic essentials. This could include a few blankets to sleep on, or finding your toothbrush in your toiletries bag. From there, do what’s necessary to settle in and enjoy your first night in your new home.

If you can, try to remain consistent with your infant’s sleep schedule. Soon you and your family will adjust to your new home and new routine.

Temporary Relocation

Simplifying Your Temporary Move

Whether you’re moving to graduate school or teaching abroad, temporary moves can be tricky. You don’t want to bring your childhood stuffed animal or large antique dresser, but you just can’t throw them away, either. What should you do?

If you’re preparing to embark on an adventure without all your belongings, use our tips below. We’ll help you navigate your journey and make the most of the process.

Step 1: Get Organized to Simplify Packing

Packing for any type of move is stressful, so pack in an organized fashion to make your temporary move much smoother. First, find or buy more moving boxes than you think you’ll need. That way you won’t have to stop halfway through packing if you run out. Next, tape up your boxes and label each box as one of three things:

  • Take
  • Store
  • Throw Awaya box full of clothes to be donated.

Go through your rooms one at a time and sort everything into boxes labeled as one of these three categories. When you fill a box, put it in a designated corner in your living room and start a new one. Don’t leave the room you’re packing until everything is boxed up. Pretty soon your living room will have three different corners filled with organized boxes.

When you’re packing this way, it’s important to be ruthless. All those old college textbooks you’ve been carrying around need to get tossed for good. Plan to pack less than you can technically bring with you in your Take boxes, and you’ll probably pack exactly what you need.

Step 2: Find a Temporary Tenant

If you plan to move back into the house or condo you own, secure a temporary tenant for the time you’ll be gone. It might be a risk to arrange a month-to-month lease since your tenant can technically terminate at any time, but you won’t be homeless if you decide to come back earlier than planned.

You can also hire a property management company to manage any landlord duties while you’re away. They’ll collect rent and handle rental-agreementcomplaints and maintenance tickets for you.

Step 3: Find Temporary Housing in Your New Area

Long-term housing is often easier to find than temporary housing. As a result, when you’re looking for temporary housing in your new city, state, or country, you might have to think outside the box. Can you find a room to rent through websites like Air BNB? Is anyone from your program moving with you? See if you can move in together to cut costs.

If your stay is quite short, you can always book a room in a long-term hotel.

Step 4: Forward Your Mail

The US Post Office makes mail forwarding simple-you just need to fill out their online form. The process costs a dollar or slightly more, so have your credit card handy.

You can forward your mail in 6-month increments. Just remember to revisit the website and extend your mail forwarding after 6 months if you’re staying longer than that.

Step 5: Store Your Belongings

This should be your final step before you fly out. Be sure to label all boxes by room so they’re easier to unpack when you return.

To stay organized and make the process easier, hire a moving company. Plus, some moving companies offer storage units along with their moving services. You can simplify your move Economy Moversby hiring one company to take care of both tasks.

If you live alone in an apartment, you’ll only need a 10 x 10 unit. If you have a family or a house full furniture, plan to rent a unit that’s at least 10 x 20. If you’re leaving your car, you can park it in the unit, too.

If you follow these tips, your temporary move will be much less stressful. Call a moving company to get started on your new adventure.

Attractive young adult couple lying on home floor with coffee cups smiling and looking at blueprints.

The Hidden Costs of Moving

So you have taken the plunge and decided to move. This is a big step, and one worthy of congratulation. But with this exciting step forward comes a lot of costs-some expected, some unexpected.

No matter what your housing situation, planning a move turns out to be an expensive endeavor. By this point, you have looked carefully at mortgage rates, rent costs, moving company deposits and so forth. But what you may not have considered are some of the smaller costs of moving.

Whether you are up sizing, downsizing, or just moving locations, these hidden costs can overwhelm your budget if you are not careful. As you budget your move, remember to keep the following hidden costs in mind.

Packing Supplies

Whether you are packing things up yourself or plan on hiring a professional moving Moving Incompany do the work, you will need boxes, bins, tape, bubble wrap, and markers. Some packing services take care of the supplies and include the cost in the final fee. Others don’t charge for labor and supplies, but may charge fees for extra packing boxes needed for added safety during the move. Either way, make sure you account for this cost.

Storing Possessions

Sometimes moves have unexpected delays. Closing on a house might take longer than anticipated, or previous tenants might not vacate the property on time. In such situations, the best solution is often to store your possessions until you are able to move in.

Prices for storage units vary, depending on size, climate control, and security measures. Though hopefully your move will go off without any delays, budget for storage for a few weeks in case you need to accommodate delays.

Managing Utility Accounts

Closing old utility accounts (including power, gas, phone, and internet) sometimes entails unforeseen fees. You will receive initial deposits from such accounts, thankfully. But often late fees or premature closing fees may make that deposit smaller than you had hoped.

Once settled in your new home, you will need to open new accounts. Opening new utility accounts often means paying deposits, set-up fees, etc.

You can prepare for both kinds of fees by calling utility companies weeks before the move. This will ensure that your accounts are square before the actual moving date.

Sleeping and Eating During the Move

Depending on how far you are moving and how you plan to get there, the actual move might include several days of travel.

As you plan, budget for transportation (gas, airplane tickets, bus tickets, parking fees, etc.). Also consider accommodations: will you be staying in a hotel in the days between moving out of your old home and into your new home? Account for food as well. If your move will take several days, you may be eating out until you have a kitchen again.

Getting SettledChecklist

Driver’s license fees, plate registration, opening or closing bank accounts or gym contracts: these all have hidden costs. When making a move across state lines especially, you will need to update many of these day-to-day contracts. You will have time once established in your new home to take care of such items, but prepare your budget for these updates as well.

Replacing Odds and Ends

If you are making a big move, you might be leaving behind (or throwing away) everyday items. For instance, cleaning supplies, baking goods, and other small fixtures you have accumulated might get left in your old house. Some items might also get lost or damaged in the move. Choose a reliable moving company to avoid this as much as possible, but anticipate replacing some odds and ends.

The best secret to reducing the budget-related stress of moving is to prepare. You may encounter unexpected situations as you relocate. By keeping these hidden costs in mind, though, such unexpected situations won’t surprise you.

For more moving advice, explore some of Bekins’ other blog posts.

Stress Free Zone

7 Ways to De-stress During a Move

In 1967, two psychiatrists developed a scale for measuring stress. According to their research, different life changes create different levels of stress in our bodies. If these stress levels get too high, we are more prone to injury and illness.

One of the stressors that Holmes and Rahe identified is a change in residence.

Right alongside that stressor are others, like a change in schools, a change in marital status, and a change in work responsibilities.

A move in and of itself may not cause overwhelming stress. But chances are if you’re moving, you are probably also making some other significant life changes as well. Collectively, these changes can produce a storm of stressors.

You may not be able to control the life changes that come your way. But the good news is that managing the stress they create is possible. Simple de-stressing activities can help you keep calm and healthy amidst the packing and planning you’ll be conquering in the coming months.

Keep a regular exercise routine

True, you might be lifting lots of heavy things, carrying items up and down staircases, and scrubbing walls and windows as you get ready to move. But don’t neglect keeping a regular exercise routine. Thirty minutes a day can greatly reduce stress and anxiety, not to mention help you maintain the energy and strength you’ll need for the big move.

Get regular sleep

If you’re moving in the middle of a change in work, the only hours you have to organize, pack, and clean might be late at night.

It’s okay to work late, but remember that your mind and body will work best when they have proper sleep. Try to keep a consistent bedtime so you can get the most out of your waking hours.

Eat a balanced dietAhealthyfooditems

With all the hustle and bustle of moving, it is easy to let good eating go. But your body needs nutrients to manage stress and maintain health. Include fresh vegetables, fruits, and plenty of drinking water in your daily eating.

Take time to play

Go for a walk, play a board game, or cook your favorite meal. Taking time away from the stressors often gives new clarity and energy. You’ll find that when you come back to the tasks at hand, you’ll be much better equipped to manage problems.

Breathe

Practice breathing deeply for a few minutes each day. You might sit on the ground or on a chair. Close your eyes and focus on inhaling and exhaling. Play some soothing music in the background if that helps.

ChecklistMake a to-do list

When you start getting overwhelmed by how many things still need doing, one of the best ways to get that stress off your shoulders is to write it all down. Take fifteen minutes and a pencil and paper. List all the tasks you need to do, small and large.

Then prioritize the tasks. Which must you do today? Which must you do this week? Writing out upcoming tasks and assigning a time for you to do each one will make the work ahead seem much more doable.

Stay on track with this moving checklist and timeline.

Surround yourself with nature

With all the time our brains and eyes spend on screens, a little bit of nature can go a long way to de-stress. Buy a plant. Find a nearby park. Sit outside and watch clouds. Having a few minutes alone with your thoughts and with nature will leave you feeling refreshed and ready to tackle the stress of moving.Walking

Find a hobby

The act of creating can do wonders for our stress levels. Whether you’re a knitter, a painter, or a model car maker, losing yourself in a new (or forgotten) hobby can alleviate anxiety and help you regain perspective. Even setting aside fifteen minutes a day for your hobby will establish a healthy, consistent pattern that you’ll find yourself enjoying more and more.

Now that you have the tools to de-stress, check out some of Bekins’ other blog posts to get more tips for a smooth, manageable move.

DSCF0326

Eat, Throw Away or Donate? What to Do with Your Food Supply Before Moving

When you’re in the hustle and bustle of moving preparations, you probably spend a lot of time decluttering. You hold a garage sale to get rid of the heavy old bookshelf and treadmill you never use. You strategize the best way to pack your craft collection.

But have you thought much about your pantry?

If you’re like most Americans, you probably have a decent store of canned goods and other non perishables hanging around your kitchen. And that doesn’t even approach all the food you have in your refrigerator and freezer.

You don’t like the idea of throwing food away, but you don’t want to pack stacks of canned goods in the moving van either.

Moving day isn’t far off-so you need a manageable strategy right now.

Complete a Food InventoryFridge

While you may keep a careful inventory of our furniture, books, and electronic devices, you probably forget about your food storage. If you don’t really buy a lot of excess food, congratulations. But if you believe in emergency supplies, you’ll need to do some counting and sorting.

To stay organized, divide your list into the following categories:

  • Frozen foods (meat, vegetables, ice cream, frozen entrées, etc.)
  • Perishable, refrigerated items (dairy products, eggs, vegetables and fruits, and condiments)
  • Foods in glass bottles (bottled fruit, drinks, olive oil, spaghetti sauce, and similar items)
  • Canned items (vegetables, fruits, soup, and so forth)
  • Boxed items (grains, cereals, and the like)
  • Plastic containers (containers for bulk foods like nuts, pasta or rice; and bottled water)
  • Food supplies in fragile containers (flour in paper sacks, bread loaves in plastic bags, etc.)

Plan for Your New Space

The best way to decide what to keep, eat, or throw away is to look ahead at your new home. Will you have more or less cupboard space there? Do you want to build up a new food supply once you arrive, or would you rather have a month’s supply of food already in place?

By asking yourself these questions now, you can better envision a food plan between now and then. Here are a few possible scenarios that could happen once you move into your new home:

  • If your new home has a pantry closet in addition to your kitchen cupboards, you may want to take more food with you.
  • If you need to downsize for your new place, consider a better division between food supplies and dishes. If you have too much of one or the other, you should probably give some things away before you move.
  • If you have a large family that goes through food quickly, you may want to move more food items with you. But pay attention to food costs vs. the cost of shipping. This can help you decide if moving all those cases of soup is really the best strategy.

pantryEat from Your Pantry for a Few Weeks

How much of your food supply can you use in your current menus? Be creative. Enlist the help of family members to decide what foods you can eat in advance.

In particular, try to use up items in glass jars. Glass is harder to protect during a move, so the fewer glass containers you have on moving day, the better. Do you really need all those glass jars of freezer jam? Consider donating any items you can’t eat before you move to neighbors and friends.

Of course, you have to be realistic when eating from your pantry. You may still have to stop by the store for a couple fresh ingredients. But you may surprise yourself when you see how many meals you can make completely from pantry foods. Don’t forget to use foods from your freezer as well.

Finally, get rid of expired goods before moving day. If you do your part ahead of time, you’ll still have what you need when you arrive at your new home-but without the hassle and expense of moving food items you didn’t have to.

Donate Your Leftovers

moveforhunger.org

moveforhunger.org

The cost of your move is based on weight plus distance of the move. Ways to cut back on your weight would be to get rid of food. Rather than throwing away non-perishable food, Bekins along with Move For Hunger make it easier than ever to donate your food.

Bekins Van Lines is a founding member of Move For Hunger. Participating local agents will pick up the unwanted, non-perishable food items and deliver it to their local food banks in the area. Your donation of food will not only save you money on your move, but will help feed a person or family in need.

Need more fresh moving tips? Browse our blog for other smart, low stress strategies before the big day.

Web-DSCF0235

What is a delivery spread?

When a sales consultant comes to your home to complete an in-home estimate, they will explain a variety of information. One such topic is your delivery spread. But, what exactly is a delivery spread?

Your sales consultant will give you a set of dates that typically range of 1-14 days for your household goods to arrive at your new home. When you sign the Bill of Lading, you agree to the dates in the window and are expected to accept the delivery within those days. The driver will call you 24-48 hours to let you know the planned date of your delivery. Meanwhile, Bekins will do their best to keep you updated on the delivery date.  A moving agent greeting a customer.

What causes the shipment to take between 1-14 days to be delivered to your new home? There are a variety of factors that goes into determining a delivery spread. The three biggest factors are:

  • The distance between your origin and destination
  • The time of year
  • The weight of your shipment

The farther the distance of the move typically means the wider the spread. Larger shipments are easier to predict days vs. smaller shipments. Smaller shipments allow for more loads on the truck, so a driver may have four or five other families that he has to deliver to or pick up in their shipment spread. For example: If you are moving from New York to Florida, the truck with belongings may be stopping in Richmond, Va. and Atlanta, Ga. before arriving in Florida with your items.

customer-service-billboardIt is a good idea to remain flexible during the delivery spread dates so you are free to accept the delivery on any of those days.  If there are any days in the delivery spread that you will be unavailable to meet the driver, always make a backup plan at the time of booking for someone else to meet the driver on those days, however this is not recommended.

In the rare circumstance your belongings will not be delivered within the delivery spread, Bekins will do what it can to accommodate you and your family. Our Customer Service department will be able to provide you with updates as they occur. If you have any questions about your shipment, please call 1-800-992-5202.

 

Web-DSCF0235

5 Things to Consider When Planning Your Moving Date

Whether you want to move your family to the big city or you need to plan a corporate move, you have lots of things to consider, including timing. If you go into your moving process knowing the tips below, you can choose the moving date that suits you best.

1. Financial Details

If you understand the timing secrets of the moving industry, you could save a lot of money. Have you ever heard of peak moving season? When it comes down to it, the highest moving volume occurs between Memorial Day and Labor Day in the United

States. According to simple laws of supply and demand, moving rates cost more during this time.

So when planning your cost-effective and frugal move, try to avoid the time between late May to September. You’ll find prices much more affordable when you move during a less busy time. Booking in advance will also help you stay within budget.

2. AvailabilityDSCF0204

In addition to your availability (and any friends helping you move), you want your chosen moving company to have a clear schedule too. In addition to finding a time outside of peak moving season, you should consider the time of month or week.

Movers are always busy on weekends, along with the beginning of the month. To ensure the most convenient pick-up and delivery times, choose a weekday in the middle of the month. This date will give you all the flexibility you want when scheduling with your moving provider.

3. Weather

The weather impacts and affects many moves, often delaying them for days or more than a week. Fair weather contributes to your move’s success as much as the right moving company.

Moving in the summer puts you right in the middle of peak moving season. Don’t forget that a sweltering day will also slow down your movers, no matter which way you look at it. At the same time, moving in the winter comes with certain hazards too.

Choose a temperate season and check the weather ahead of time-and look at the forecast for your destination too. When you choose a day with optimal weather, you will protect your belongings as well as optimize your moving team’s productivity. You can’t control everything, but you can avoid a lot of problems by planning ahead.

4. Adjustment TimeDSCF0301

Whether you have a host of employees or your own family to worry about, you need to give your people time to adjust after a move. If you have to move a company, choose a time when your employees don’t have other events to distract them.

As you make your choice, pay special attention to holiday times, both before and after. Employees may struggle to stay focused if they’re excited for or recovering from winter break.

As for family factors, keep in mind that holidays are a great time to make your goodbyes to family and friends. However, traffic right after a large holiday can prove inconvenient.

You should also take the school calendar into account if you have children at home. A move after the school year ends might make sense until you realize it leaves no time to adjust to moving or say goodbye to friends. Give your family at least a month after the academic year ends to prepare for the move.

5. Personal Preferences

In the end, the best time to move is the date that works most conveniently for you after you’ve considered the above factors. Take time to stop and think about each of these factors when you plan your move.

Consider finances, company availability, the season, and adjustment time. With these factors in mind, you’ll find the best moving date for you, your family, your employees, and everyone else involved.

Milit_Family

Permanent Change of Station: Tips for Surviving Your First Military Move

When you receive orders for your first permanent change of station, it can be hard to know where to start. Most importantly, you’ll want to take advantage of the available resources.

Before you worry about anything else, make sure you take advantage of the following entitlements:

  • Temporary Lodging Allowance. If you are moving overseas, you may ask for a temporary lodging allowance. This entitlement provides a lodging allowance for military members until they find permanent housing.
  • Temporary Lodging Expense. Like the allowance mentioned above, this expense covers lodging for military families. The main difference is that this is for members moving within the continental United States.
  • House Hunting Trip. Before your move, you will receive up to 10 days of temporary duty Military-Moving1leave. During this time, you can make a house hunting trip to your new station without paying a fee for leave.

Once you’ve taken advantage of these entitlements, you can start to plan the rest of your moving details.

Get In Touch with the Right Programs

Which relocation program you work with depends on your branch of military. Most often, you will need to contact the Transportation Management Office. This group will provide information on the coordination and reimbursement for your move.

If you have questions, you can also get in touch with your base transportation office. The name of this office varies among service branches:

  • Household Goods Shipping Office (Coast Guard)
  • Personal Property Shipping Office (Marine Corps and Navy)
  • Installation Transportation Office (Army)
  • Traffic Management Office (Air Force)
  • Joint Personal Property Shipping Office (Department of Defense)

The earlier you can make an appointment, the smoother your move will be. Once you’re familiar with the moving options available, you’ll be able to make some final decisions.

Make Preparations for Your Family

If your family is making the move as well, you’ll want to make additional preparations. For family_01this reason, most relocation programs provide family centers. This resource allows your family to become familiar with the new community. In preparing your family for the move, you can also do the following:

  • Request a sponsor. A sponsor from your destination provides extra support to your family. This individual can also prepare for the move by helping you determine which items to take.
  • Connect with employment assistance programs. Once you reach your destination, your spouse may be on the hunt for new employment opportunities. Your post or base may offer an employment assistance program to help with this step. Members of this program may also help your spouse apply for the Accredited Financial Counselor® certificate. Military spouses can earn this certificate while they provide financial guidance to other military families.

By taking advantage of these services and more, you ensure a smoother transition for your loved ones.

Seek Guidance from a Local Moving Company

Finally, you can make further preparations by contacting a local moving company. With so many programs available, this resource is sometimes overlooked by military families. While it may seem easier to have the military move you, there are a lot of advantages to opting for a Moving InDIY, Personally Procured Move. These advantages include the following:

  • Saved money. Rather than having the government move you, you can choose to receive 95 percent of what that move would cost. The advantage here is that you get to keep whatever money you have left over. So, by working with a moving company and taking advantage of discounts, you can actually make money on your move.
  • Increased control. Of course, another advantage will be greater control over your move. Rather than leaving all the decisions to the government, you can make those choices yourself.
  • Additional time. The other bonus will be your ability to create your own timeline. If you plan wisely, you may save time by procuring your own move.

When you connect with a local moving expert, he or she will be able to answer some of your pressing questions about relocating to a new base. Remember, the sooner you get started, the smoother your transition will be!