Category Archives: Moving Tips

think green

Color Your Move Green

Making your move environmentally friendly is easy! Here are a few guidelines to color your move green!

Sell or Give Away non-essential items:

Moving is a great way to get rid of things that are no longer needed, which will in turn reduce the cost of your move!

  • Yard Sales, CraigsList, Ebay are great resources to sell your items that you no longer need.
  • Donating items to charities, which are tax deductible and are helping others in need.
  • Books can be donated to local libraries, and most schools will be happy to make use of old computers.
  • Donate your excess food to local food pantries or to Move For Hunger.
  • Cut down on junk mail at your new address by filing a temporary change of address with your post office rather than a permanent one.

Use recyclable and reusable packing materials:

  • Your local Bekins agent can provide you with gently used cartons for a reduced fee, or no charge.
  • Use towels, sheets and blankets to wrap breakable items rather than bubble wrap, peanuts or packing paper.
  • If you do need to use peanuts, use cornstarch peanuts because they are biodegradable.
  • If you have room in your basement, garage or attic, keep some boxes for your next move or use them for storage of holiday décor and out of season clothing and shoes.
  • Use recyclable packing paper.
  • If you don’t want to keep your boxes take them to your local recycling center.

Use Eco Friendly Cleaning Supplies

  • Look for products that are non-toxic, biodegradable, and made from renewable resources (not petroleum).
  • Since cleaning supplies are not permitted for a move, you can make your own cleaning products with some vinegar, baking soda and warm water.

Natural cleaners. Vinegar, baking soda, salt and lemon.

Staying Green Post Move

  • Set up a recycling station in your kitchen or garage.
  • Upgrade your insulation – this can improve your home’s energy draw by 20-30 percent.
  • When buying new appliances, consider buying Energy Star-qualified.
  • Buy a new houseplant to improve air quality in your home.
  • Filter your tap water to avoid buying water bottles.
  • Pay your bills electronically, usually there are discounts and perks when you do this.
  • Reduce use of bug sprays and pesticides.
  • Unplug phone and computer chargers when not in use.
  • Use compact fluorescent, LED or halogen light bulbs.
  • Adjust your heat/air conditioning when no one is home.

 

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This is Moving – Terminology

The moving world has its own lingo and when preparing for a move it is important to understand the terminology.  Below are common words that you may come across in the moving process:

Accessorial (additional) services – Services, such as packing, appliance servicing, unpacking or stair carries, that you request to be performed (or are necessary because of landlord requirements or other special circumstances). Charges for these services are in addition to the transportation charges. Learn more about Bekins Additional Service.

Advanced charges – Charges for services performed by someone other than the movers. A professional, craftsman or other third party may perform these services at your request. The mover pays for these services and adds the charges to your Bill of Lading charges.

Agent – A local moving company authorized to act on behalf of a national van line. The agent may handle the booking, origin, hauling and/or destination services. Find your Local Agent

Agreed delivery date – The agreed delivery date can range from one day to several depending on the weight of your shipment. Your salesperson will discuss the transit times with you prior to registering your shipment with Bekins Traffic Department.

Agreed pick-up date – The agreed pick-up date can range from one day to several depending on the weight of your shipment. Your salesperson will discuss the transit times with you prior to registering your shipment with Bekins Traffic Department.

American Moving & Storage Association (AMSA) – The trade organization for the moving industry.amsa-logo

Appliance Service by Third Party – The preparation of major electrical appliances to make them safe for shipment. Charges for these services may be in addition to the line-haul charges.

Auto inventory – A form used when relocating an automobile, motorcycle or boat that lists the vehicle’s miles and condition at both origin and destination. Can also be referred to as motor vehicle inventory.

Auxiliary service or Shuttle Service – Use of a smaller vehicle to provide service when the residence is not accessible to the mover’s normal equipment. Shuttle service involves offloading the goods from the original equipment and reloading to a smaller vehicle. Depending on the weight of the shipment, this could involve several trips with the smaller vehicle. The shuttle charge is based on a rate-per-hundred weight.

DSCF0237Bill of Lading – The receipt for your goods and the contract for their transportation. It is your responsibility to understand the Bill of Lading before you sign it. If you do not agree with something on the Bill of Lading, do not sign it until you are satisfied that it is correct. The Bill of Lading is an important document. Don’t lose or misplace your copy.
Bingo sheet – A form that allows a van operator or customer to easily check off items as they are delivered. Also called a check-off sheet.

Booking agent – The agent who prepares the estimate of cost from the information obtained during a visual survey. The booking agent does not necessarily have to be located at or near the origin. When the booking agent is located at the origin, they will also be the origin agent and perform the visual survey.

Bulky article – To ensure safe transportation, some articles included in a shipment (e.g. big screen television, motorcycles, hot tubs, etc.) require extra handling and/or blocking. There is an extra charge for such items.

Carrier – The moving company holding the operating authority required to transport household goods.

Cash on Delivery (COD) – Transportation for an individual shipper for which payment is required at the time of delivery at the destination residence (or warehouse).

Certified scale – Any scale designed for weighing motor vehicles, including trailers or semitrailers not attached to a tractor, and certified by an authorized scale inspector and licensing authority. A certified scale may also be a platform or warehouse type scale that is properly inspected and certified.

Commercial shipper – Any person who is named as the consignor or consignee in a Bill of Lading contract who is not the owner of the goods being transported but who assumes the responsibility for payment of the transportation and other tariff charges for the account of the beneficial owner of the goods. The beneficial owner of the goods is normally an employee of the consignor and/or consignee.

Consignor – The person at origin who arranges for the transportation of the shipment.

Crating – Refers to the process of building a custom wood crate for the purpose of protecting certain items during transport.

Cube – A measurement of the capacity or cubic space of a truck or container. The industry average of is seven pounds per cubic foot.

Cube sheet – A document used to determine the cubic feet that furniture, appliances, cartons and miscellaneous articles occupy in the van. By converting the cubic feet into pounds, an estimated weight is acquired that is used in calculating the estimated cost for a move. Also referred to as a Table of Measurements.Bekins Table of Measurements (Cube Sheet)

 

CWT – An abbreviation for “per 100 pounds of specified weight.” Per-hundred weight.

Department of Transportation (DOT) – The federal agency which governs the interstate transportation industry, including movers of household goods.

Destination agent – Affiliated agent in the city to which the customer is moving. They are required to furnish storage at destination, unpacking and arranges for appliance service, if requested.

Disassembled by owner (DBO) – Items are disassembled by owner rather than by the moving company. Bekins is not responsible for the reassembly of these items.

Dispatcher – Assumes the task of communicating the route of a shipment to van operators and agents, making sure that instructions are carried out accordingly.

Estimate: Binding – This is a written agreement made in advance with the moving company. It guarantees the total cost of the move based upon the quantities and services shown on the estimate. Learn more about estimates.

Estimate: Non-Binding – This is an approximation of the cost by the moving company, based on the estimated weight of the shipment and the accessorial services requested. A non-binding estimate is not binding on the mover. The final charges will be based upon the actual weight of your shipment, the services provided and the tariff provisions in effect. Learn more about estimates.

Estimated Weight – An approximate weight of a shipment determined by multiplying the estimated cubes by seven pounds.

Expedited Service – An agreement with the mover to perform transportation by a set date in exchange for charges based on a higher minimum weight.

Extra delivery – A portion of a shipment unloaded at a location other than the destination address indicated on the Bill of Lading. Also referred to as an extra stop.

Extra pick up – A portion of a shipment loaded at a location other than the origin address indicated on the Bill of Lading. Also referred to as an extra stop.

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) – Established within the Department of Transportation to regulate the safe operation requirements for commercial vehicle drivers, carriers, vehicles and vehicle equipment.

Flight charge – An extra charge for carrying items up or down flights of stairs.

Fuel surcharge – The moving company’s tariff provides for a percentage adjustment to the transportation charge (and SIT Pickup and Delivery) to aid in recovery of the increased cost of fuel. The surcharge, which can change twice monthly, is based upon the national average cost of diesel, as reported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

Gross weight – The weight of the truck after a shipment has been loaded. Also referred to as the heavy weight.

Hauling agent – The agent who owns the van assigned by the van line to transport your household goods from origin to destination.

Helper – A peDSCF3289rson hired by the van operator or agent to assist in the loading and unloading of goods. Bekins requires all helper labor be certified.

High value article – Items included in a shipment that are valued at more than $100 per pound. These items should be disclosed with the mover to ensure they are protected accordingly. Also referred to as items of extraordinary value.

Household goods (HHG) – Personal goods or property used in a home.

Household goods descriptive inventory – The detailed descriptive list of your household goods showing the number and condition of each item. Also referred to as an inventory.

Individual shipper – The individual requesting movement of a shipment and paying the transportation charges.

Interstate move – The relocation of goods in the United States from a place in one state to a place in a different state.

Intrastate move – The relocation of goods within one state that never crosses state lines or includes a segment outside of that same state. Intrastate moves are NOT regulated by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration.

Inventory – The detailed descriptive list of your household goods showing the number and condition of each item. Also referred to as a household goods descriptive inventory.

Items of extraordinary value – Items included in a shipment that are valued at more than $100 per pound. These items should be disclosed with the mover to ensure they are protected accordingly. Also referred to as high value article. Learn more about replacement value protection.

Leave over – When articles to be shipped are left behind due to insufficient space on the primary van. An additional van(s) is then utilized for transportation and delivery. Also referred to as an overflow.

Light weight – The weight of a truck before a shipment is loaded, including all essential loading equipment and packing materials. Also referred to as the tare weight.

Line haul – The charges for the vehicle transportation portion of your relocation. These charges apply in addition to the accessorial service charges.

Load spread – Agreed pick-up dates.

Local move – A move within a particular geographical area like a town or district instead of a state or country. Learn more about local moves.

Long carry – An added charge for carrying articles excessive distances between the mover’s vehicle and the residence. Charges for these services may be in addition to the line-haul charges.

Motor vehicle inventory – A form used when transporting an automobile, motorcycle or boat that lists the vehicle’s miles and condition at both origin and destination. Also referred to as auto inventory.

Net weight – The actual weight of a shipment obtained by subtracting the tare weight from the gross weight.

Operating authority – The government permit that defines the scope of a carrier’s operation by area and commodity.

Order for Service – The document authorizing the mover to transport your household goods.

Order (Bill of Lading) number – The number used to identify and track your shipment. The number appears on all documentation and correspondence. Also referred to as the Registration Number.

Origin agent – The agent responsible for performing packing and preparing necessary documentation for the move. Click here to find your local agent.

Overflow – When articles to be shipped are left behind due to insufficient space on the primary van. An additional van(s) is then utilized for transportation and delivery. Also referred to as a leave over.

Packed by owner (PBO) – Used on the inventory to identify cartons that have been packed by the customer. Learn more about packing.

Packing date – A date set aside for packing. It is usually one day prior to loading of the goods.
Permanent storage – The warehousing of a shipment for an unspecified duration.

Pickup and delivery charges – Separate transportation charges applicable for transporting your shipment between the storage-in-transit warehouse and your residence.

Planner – Assumes the task of assigning a hauling agent to load, transport, and unload shipments as they are registered in Bekins Traffic Department.

promover_colorProMover Program – A certification program created by the American Moving & Storage Association (AMSA). The program gives consumers an easy way to separate reputable, professional movers from rogue movers. ProMovers must meet stringent requirements and agree to comply with the regulations set forth by AMSA as well as the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) and the Surface Transportation Board (STB). Bekins and all its agents are certified ProMovers.

Purchase order – A written authorization for billing a relocation to a company. It is sometimes used in place of the Order for Service.

Reweigh – When there is doubt about the origin weight of a shipment, a reweigh may be requested by the customer at destination. There is no charge for the reweigh; however, charges are calculated on the new weight.

Scale ticket – A voucher providing the weigh scale reading for tare weight and/or gross weight of a van.

Shuttle service – Use of a smaller vehicle to provide service when the residence is not accessible to the mover’s normal equipment. Shuttle service involves offloading the goods from the original equipment and reloading to a smaller vehicle. Depending on the weight of the shipment, this could involve several trips with the smaller vehicle. The shuttle charge is based on a rate-per-hundred weight. Also referred to as auxiliary service.

Spread dates – The combined dates for the agreed pick up and the agreed delivery.

Storage-in-transit (SIT) – Temporary warehouse storage of your shipment pending further transportation. For example, if your new home isn’t quite ready to occupy. You must specifically request SIT service, which may not exceed a total of 90 days of storage, and you will be responsible for the added charges for SIT service as well as the warehouse handling and final delivery charges.

Stretch wrap – The material and process used to protect overstuffed furniture (except leather and suede) from damage. Also referred to as shrink wrap.

Surface Transportation Board (STB) – The agency within the Department of Transportation responsible for the regulation and monitoring of railroads and rates for the household goods industry.

Table of Measurements – A document used to determine the cubic feet that furniture, appliances, cartons and miscellaneous articles occupy in the van. By converting the cubic feet into pounds, an estimated weight is acquired that is used in calculating the estimated cost for a move. Also referred to as a Cube Sheet.

Tare weight – The weight of a truck before a shipment is loaded, including all essential loading equipment and packing materials. Also referred to as the light weight.

Tariff – The mover’s required, published price, list of rules, regulations, rates and charges for the performance of interstate moving services.

Transit time – The time from when your belongings are picked up to when they are delivered to the designated destination.

Transportation charge – The cost of a single loading, transporting and unloading of goods comprise the charge.

Uncrating – Refers to the process of removing the wooden crating material from items that had been crated.

Unpacking – Services required to remove or undo packing of goods at the end of a shipment’s transportation. Learn more about Bekins unpacking services.

Valuation – The degree of “worth” of the shipment. The valuation charge compensates the mover for assuming a greater degree of liability than that provided for in the base transportation charges. Learn about Bekins valuation options.

Van line – A motor carrier with local agents that coordinates the movement of household goods and special products.

Van operator – The individual who oversees the loading, hauling and unloading of your household goods.

Visual survey – A visual survey is performed by the origin agent to determine which items are to be moved. The amount of packing required and any special services necessary to properly service your shipment are determined during the survey. A cube sheet is prepared and used to determine the weight. The weight is the basis for the moving cost. All elements of the survey come together to determine an estimated cost for moving your goods.

Your Rights and Responsibilities When You Move – A government-required publication given to all COD customers. Learn more about Your Rights and Responsibilities When You Move.

Lola 4

Moving Lola

Today is National Dog Day – my favorite day! I wanted to share my experience about moving with my dog, Lola, and how to prepare for moving pets on interstate moves.

When my fiancée Pat was offered a relocation from Charlotte, N.C. to Indianapolis, Ind., the first thing we thought about was how our dog Lola would deal with the move?

Around three and a half years ago Lola was found as a stray and we decided to give her a home. She suffers from separation anxiety and we knew a move like this would be difficult for her.

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Lola, Pat and I after a hike in Charlotte, N.C.

Before our relocation, I made an appointment with Lola’s veterinarian. I spoke with her about the challenges that we may face when we moved. She suggested she may act out and although it could be frustrating we shouldn’t punish her because she is just confused. She recommended that we keep a close eye on her during the moving process and in our new home so she wouldn’t run away. We made sure all of Lola’s vaccinations were up-to-date and acquired a current veterinarian record to give to our new vet in Indianapolis as well as any boarding/grooming places that require vet records.

I also checked the US State and Territory Animal Import Regulations Web site to verify what to do when moving across state lines. I notified Charlotte Animal Care and Control that we were moving and gave them our new address. I updated the address for Lola’s microchip and identification tags, as well, in the event she does run away.

When we were packing all of our stuff, Lola noticed things were changing and this caused her to act increasingly anxious, which we were prepared for. We tried to do our best to make her feel comfortable and increased her daily exercise. This helped tire her out and not act out as much.

When we were loading our household goods onto the moving truck, we arranged for Lola to go to our neighbor’s house during this time so she would not be in the way. This is recommended for any household that has pet during a move.

For the ride to IndianLola 1apolis, it was a challenge to figure out what was needed for me and Pat, but also for Lola. We brought her bed, a few toys, bags, a water dish, water and food. With every stop, we made sure she was properly hydrated and well-fed. She slept most of the 10-hour drive. We stayed in a hotel on the way and used Pet’s Welcome Web site to determine which places permitted pets.

After 10 hours and a hotel stop we finally made it to our new home in Indianapolis. We allowed Lola to sniff around the house and acclimate herself to the new surroundings. Although we have a fenced-in yard, I still kept a close eye on her to make sure she wouldn’t escape. Lola is a notorious escape artist and fences don’t always do the trick.  When the movers came with our stuff, I kept Lola out of the way by keeping her on a leash outside.

Lola getting comfortable in our new home in Indianapolis

Lola getting comfortable in our new home in Indianapolis

It took a few weeks of adjustment. She went through a bit of a mourning period (she missed outrneighbor and her dog) and didn’t eat. I was worried and consulted with my vet. She explained that this is normal for dogs that experience a drastic change and she would eventually eat when she got hungry, which she did. I made sure that Lola had plenty of exercise by walking her frequently on the Monon Trail, a 13-mile trail in Indianapolis.

We also met our neighbors and let her play with their dog. By talking to our neighbors, we learned about the best places to take Lola, including parks, vets and boarding. We also used Angie’s List and Yelp to help find the best pet places around town.

We are all settled in Indianapolis now. Hopefully Lola’s moving experience can help you prepare for moving with your pet!

Tell us your story about moving with your pet!

For more about moving with pets, please visit http://www.bekins.com/planning-guides/moving-with-children-and-pets/

 

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The ULTIMATE Check List For Changing Your Address

Between hiring a moving company, packing up your household goods, and preparing for a new home, it is hard to find the time to change your address through various organizations. To better organize your move, Bekins Van Lines has created a list of everywhere you might need to change your address before and after moving.

Utilities:
America Move Assist can help finding new utility companies in your area

o    Electric *
o    Gas *
o    Water *
o    Garbage/Recycling *
o    Telephone/Mobile *
o    Cable *
o    Internet *
o    Fuel *
o    Water/Sewage *
o    Lawn/Garden Services/Pool Services
o    Housecleaning Services
o    Internet sites – iTunes, amazon, Netflix, etc.

Finance

o    Banks  – Make sure your current bank has branches in the area, if not, you may want to switching banks
o    Major Credit Cards
o    Department Store Credit Cards
o    Loan Institutions
o    Insurance Agencies * – Check to see if your coverage will need to change when moving to a different state or area.
o    Pension Plans
o    Air Rewards Programs
o    Accountant/Tax Consultant
o    Professional Memberships/Licensing Boards

Government Public Offices

o    DMV – Most states make you change this within 90 days of moving. Some states require a written test before obtaining a license
o    Vehicle Registration
o    Social Security *
o    Post Office *
o    Veteran Affairs *
o    Income Tax/IRS *
o    Pension Benefits *
o    Unemployment Insurance *

Personal
o    Register children for school * – Free school reports
o    Find new physicians and dentist
o    Find a new place to a new place of worship

* Changing your address is recommended before you move

dorm 2

Successfully Move into a College Dorm

Freshman year of college is an exciting and nerve-wracking time. For most first-year students, the first step of college is moving into a dorm room. This can be a challenging process due to the limited space and the distance from home. Here are some tips to help streamline the moving process and start your college career on the right foot.

  • Talk to the resident halls and contact your roommate: Find out what is provided in the dorm room as well as the dimensions. You will need to figure out how your things must fit without overcrowding. Usually, the housing department will provide your future roommate’s name. It is a good idea to contact them to ask what they will be bringing and avoid having duplicate items in the room.
  • Take Inventory: Before you begin shopping and packing, go through your closet. Donate items that are no longer needed. Depending on the climate, pack clothes for the approaching seasons. It is best to be prepared until winter break.
  • Pack only the essentials: Space is very limited, especially when living with a roommate. It is important to only pack items that are absolutely necessary. If you have more than a car load, you’re probably taking too much.
  • Use Storage Bins: Packing clothing and supplies in plastic storage bins will ease packing the car and hauling them up the stairs. With the help of bed risers, storage bins can be kept under the bed with out-of-season clothing and supplies that are not needed on a daily basis. Tips for arranging your room

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  • Develop a Plan: Before moving in, plan out the move. When packing the car, pack the items that are necessary for the move so they are easily accessible. Strategize how to arrange the furniture in your room and show your parents where you would like things to go.
  • Get there early: The earlier the better when moving to avoid the crowd. An impromptu shopping trip will most likely be needed for items that were left at home. If you live far away, consider driving the night before and staying in a hotel.
  • Decorate last: After packing away your clothes and everyday supplies, spend some time making your space your own.

Good luck with your first year of school! It goes by fast, so enjoy it!

Meet new neighbors after a relocation by shopping for groceries with your dog

Ripley after our relocation to Indiana. He loves hanging out at the local farmers market.

Ripley after our relocation to Indiana. He loves hanging out at the local farmers market.


Relocating from Oklahoma to Indiana was a stressful experience for me and my family. Our relocation was prompted by my husband’s job transfer. Essentials had been packed and taken with us on our drive to get us through a few days until the professional relocation company delivered our furniture. We arrived in Indiana to an empty house. The first few days were a little like camping. After a long car ride and sitting in an empty house, the family was starting to get a little stir crazy.

New to the city and neighborhood, we decided to get out and about. So, we leashed up our dog, Ripley, and went to the local farmers market. It was a great experience! We met lots of locals and several of our neighbors as well as many local farmers. I even met a local rancher and purchased some meats to grill that evening. Our dog enjoyed exploring and meeting new canine friends, too. Many people stopped to chat with us because Ripley helped break the ice. It was a win-win and made us feel at home more quickly.

If you just moved to a new community, get out and explore by taking a trip to the local farmers market. The markets are free to roam, many have live entertainment and most have some prepared foods and snacks, which are perfect if your appliances haven’t arrived yet. Just being outside around other local people and the fresh, brightly colored fruits and veggies makes you feel more welcome.

Our family has gone to the local farmers market every Saturday it’s open. I love having the option to take my dog shopping for groceries!

Click here for a list of farmers markets in your area.

Relocating with Rhonda

Rhonda Baker (second from left) joined Bekins' Sales & Marketing team in early Spring

Rhonda Baker (second from left) joined Bekins’ Sales & Marketing team in early Spring


Relocating is a unique experience for everyone. It’s exciting for some and dreadful for others. One of the best ways to understand the process is by seeking advice from those who’ve experienced it first-hand.

Sales and Marketing Project Manager, Rhonda Baker joined the Bekins Van Lines team this spring. Prior to her job and life in Indiana, she lived in Oklahoma City with her two sons and husband. When her husband’s job required relocating, they packed up their life and headed to Fishers, Ind.

“I grew up in Oklahoma,” said Rhonda. “It’s all I had known my entire life.”

Adjusting to such a major change is no easy task. Rhonda’s advice – Don’t overlook the milestone. In the weeks leading up to the move, be intentional about spending time with friends and family for a proper goodbye.

“Relocating definitely makes you appreciate friends and family,” said Rhonda. “You won’t take any time together for granted. It inspired me to make more of an effort to get together with close friends and family.”

Rhonda said she looks forward to planning several trips to visit her two sons, lifelong friends and family who still live in Oklahoma.

“I was most surprised about the amount of planning involved,” said Rhonda.

Rhonda attributes a great deal of the success of her move to the attention to detail in planning prior to relocating. She went as far as measuring their current furniture and comparing it to measurements of the new house. This saved time, money and space when it came to deciding what items to move.

“Downsizing and adjusting to a new home was definitely a challenging aspect of moving.”

She suggests diving into your favorite hobbies soon after relocating. For Rhonda, it is gardening and sprucing up her outdoor space. This made the new house feel like a home and took her mind off the move.

She also suggests asking a friend to ‘dog-sit’ for moving day. The last thing you want is your precious pooch running away on moving day.

“Having Ripley running around the new house made it feel more like home. Pets can play a huge emotional role in moving.”

Heed the advice of someone who has seen moving from the professional standpoint as well as personal.

5 Questions to ask during an In-home Estimate

Knowing the right questions to ask during an In-home Estimate is crucial to making it a success. Time is of the essence, so make your next estimate worth it by checking out a few must-ask questions.

promover_colorAre they a Pro-Mover?

A good question to ask when considering a moving company is whether or not they are Pro-Mover certified. Avoid a loss of time and money by ‘scammers’ by asking a few simple questions. Look for the Pro-Mover certification confirming that the company is indeed reputable and professional.

Full Explanation of a Pro-Mover.

Are there reviews readily available?

Do a little research on the company. Ask where you can find organic reviews and feedback from customers who have used their services. Of course being realistic and using good judgment when reading reviews is necessary. Also consider awards that the company has received.  Viewing Better Business Bureau and Angie’s List are both reputable companies to start the review research process.

Online sources through social media outlets can be resource to use when searching for reviews. However, keep in mind using realistic judgment is necessary when reviewing. Extreme opinions are often expressed over social media platforms, yet still might be worth checking out.

What is an estimate based on?

Be sure to inquire what the estimate is being based on. There are many ways that the costs of a move can be calculated. It will be in your greatest interest to fully understand the way in which your estimate will be based.

What does the travel look like?

The moving and storage industry is a unique industry and often more complex than one might assume. Inquiring about the route your household goods will be taking once departing from your home isn’t a bad idea.  This can prevent miscommunication and misunderstanding throughout your relocation process.

QUESTIONWhat questions do they have for you?

It’s equally important the moving company asks you questions. You can assume the move will be detailed oriented and professionally handled when a company inquires about the specifics on your move. Any company that does not go the extra mile to consider every aspect of your move should be removed from your list.