Category Archives: Packing

Labeling Boxes

How to Prepare Your Belongings for Temporary Storage

Whether you’re in the process of moving or your office is in the middle of a renovation, temporary storage is something to consider with all of your moving and storage options. It provides a safe place for you to store your belongings until it is convenient for you to finish moving.

In general, there are two types of temporary storage: an on-site unit kept at a moving company’s facility and a portable unit that you can have delivered to your new home at a time that is best for you.

Temporary storage can simplify your moving process. But haphazardly shoving things into boxes and dumping them into your unit could cause stress and frustration. Follow these steps to organize your packing and your unit.

Choose a Unit to Fit Your Needs

No matter if it’s a stationary unit or a portable unit, you want to select an appropriate size. A unit that is too big will end up costing more while a unit that is too small will make it difficult for you to fit everything. As a general rule of thumb, choose a unit that is a little Economy Moversbigger than what you actually need to help cut down on expense and stress.

If choosing the right size seems a little daunting, talk with your moving company. They can tell you approximately what size you will need based on what you plan to store. For example, furniture will take up more space than boxes of files, so your size decision will depend on what you need to temporarily store.

Pack Wisely

Because this is temporary storage, you don’t need to worry about taking special care to prepare your things for a long-term stay. However, you still want to protect your belongings so they aren’t damaged.

When packing your boxes, avoid stuffing too much in them or else the box might break. Invest in bubble wrap, furniture covers, and other packing materials to ensure your possessions arrive safely to the unit and then safely back to your home or office. To help with packing, defrost your fridge and freezer, drain your lawn mower and other machinery of fuel, and remove batteries from your devices. These extra precautions will keep your possessions safe.

As you pack, remember to label your boxes so you know what’s in them. This will make it easier for you to locate items in your unit later on. You can save yourself some time by deciding which boxes you will need access to during the transition period and grouping them accordingly. DSCF0301Then, when you pack your car or truck, you can put the boxes that you want at the front of your unit and the ones you won’t need at the back.

Remember to leave anything perishable or flammable out of your unit. Your moving company might have a few other restrictions on what you can store, so ask them if they have any specific regulations. Some companies might even pack and load your things for you.

Know Where Everything Is

To make a temporary situation even easier, you can create a diagram showing where everything in your unit is. This will save you time if you need to get something from your unit before moving day. If you’re planning on keeping only some of your possessions in the unit, you can also make a list of everything you have in your unit so you know what’s there and what is still in your car, hotel room, or elsewhere.

Take advantage of the convenience of temporary storage and the stress it will save you. By organizing and preparing your belongings, you will be able to save time and worry less. This will keep your possessions safe during a transition to a new home or a remodel at your office.

Study Abroad

Moving Abroad for School? What You Should Take with You

Whether you have a study abroad in your future or you plan to pursue a graduate degree at an international school, you have a lot of preparation ahead of you. You have to leave your family and friends behind, secure your finances, and decide what you want to take with you. You also have to get all your documents in order, including your passport and your visa.

The sheer number of preparatory steps may overwhelm you. However, we want to help you with at least one of those steps: deciding what to take with you. Below, we’ve given you a list of five things you should take with you and three things you should not.

What You Should Take

  1. Passport, Visa, Temporary Address, and Foreign Spending Moneypassport

You already know you need your passport and visa to enter and stay in the country. And if you have an extended stay, you will also need a temporary mailing address. That address should correspond to your dorm or host family’s home.

Additionally, you should take out $300 in your new country’s currency. You’ll need this money for basic purchases in your first few days there.

  1. Basic Clothing

If you go abroad for school, you’ll spend far more time studying and sightseeing than you will worrying about your wardrobe, so you only need the basics. Pack two weeks’ worth of clothing, and supplement it with new purchases once you arrive if necessary. Your two weeks’ supply should include:

  • Pajamas
  • Undergarments
  • Tops-mostly T-shirts and tank tops for layering
  • Jeans (and leggings, if you prefer them)
  • One or two jackets
  • A coat, hat, and gloves (if you plan to study in a temperate or cold climate)
  • One or two pairs of basic walking shoes
  • Workout clothes (including shoes)
  • Dress clothes (including shoes)

If you have room, you caBest-Suitcasesn also bring a few accessories like jewelry, scarves, etc. However, you shouldn’t worry about accoutrements too much.

  1. Bedroom Basics

You’ll need towels, washcloths, sheets, pillows, pillowcases, and a blanket to feel comfortable in your dorm or host bedroom. You should also consider small decorations to make the room feel more like home, but don’t go overboard.

  1. School Supplies

These supplies include your laptop and charging cord, but don’t forget to get an adapter. Many foreign countries don’t use the same outlet configuration that Americans do.

Additionally, purchase normal school supplies like pens and notebook paper. You may also need flashcards or a calculator depending on your needs. Simply purchase the school supplies you would normally use.

  1. Extras

Your foreign study won’t feel as fulfilling if you don’t document it. Take a camera with a large memory card, and keep a diary. You’ll thank yourself later.

What You Shouldn’t Take

  1. Toiletries

Many students make the mistake of packing basic items like toiletries. You don’t need these items cluttering your suitcases or boxes because you can simply purchase them once you arrive. Give your giant bottles of shampoo and conditioner to your roommates, and dispose of anything they don’t feel comfortable using, like deodorant or toothpaste.

However, you don’t have to go without these items until you go to the store. Insteplanead, put small, travel-sized shampoo, conditioner, toothpaste, deodorant, contact solution, feminine supplies, and makeup in your carry-on.

  1. Seasonal Outfits

As mentioned above, you only need a basic set of clothes for two weeks. You don’t need to bring every sweater, necklace, tie, or pair of shorts you own. Instead, pack clothing you can layer.

  1. Personal Comfort Items

You may feel like you need a few keepsakes to remind you of your family and friends while you live abroad, but you don’t need as many as you think. Bring family pictures, one familiar blanket, and a couple knickknacks if necessary, but don’t let these items occupy more than 10% of your total packing space.

Bekins would like to assist in providing you more information about moving abroad. Visit  our page dedicated to international moving references & resources to learn more.

Infographic: Countdown to a successful move

You are moving and you have so much to do with so little time. Don’t panic! The best way to combat the stress of moving is to organize and set deadlines of when to accomplish everything on your to-do list.

Below is a countdown infographic to help achieve a successful move with less stress.

Countdown to a successful move - Bekins

 

For useful moving tips and tricks, please visit Bekins Van Lines website. If you have any questions about your upcoming move, talk to your local Bekins agent.

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Office Moving

Stay Cool During your Summer Move

It’s hot outside and you feel as if you can cut the humid air with a knife and are just dreading the thought of packing and loading all of your stuff. Not only is this uncomfortable, but moving in the heat could be dangerous if you don’t take precautions. Below are some tips to stay safe in the heat during your move.

Stay Hydrated 

Your body will need more water to stay hydrated and keep your core body temperature where it needs to be. Drink 5-7 ounces of fluids every 15 to 20 minutes to replenish the necessary fluids in your body. Beverages with electrolytes will keep yourself energized, waterbut avoid energy drinks.

Also, eat foods that will give your energy while not dehydrating you. Instead of foods with high sodium content (salt) opt for fruits, vegetables, nuts and protein to help get you through the day. Also avoid caffeine and alcohol which can speed up dehydration.

AC on both ends of the move

If possible, don’t turn off your electricity in your new home until the day after you move, and schedule the power to be turned on in your new home a day before you move in. That way, you will be able to use your air conditioning during loading and delivery. If you don’t have air conditioning, consider buying fans to keep you cool keep during your move.

Dress Appropriately

Dress in a light colored t-shirt and in shorts to help keep cool. Lighter clothes will improve your circulation during the move, which helps prevent heat stroke and heat exhaustion. If the temperature is very hot, dampen a towel or cloth in cold water and place it on top of your shoulders. This may sound uncomfortable, but it will help keep your core body temperature down.

Take Breaks

It’s hard to do, especially when moving, but try not to over exert yourself. Rest frequently in a cool spot. Try to move items either early morning or later in the day when it may be cooler.

SunscreenWear sunscreen

Use a sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15. Apply the sunscreen over exposed skin and reapply every two hours, especially if you are sweating profusely. It is also a good idea to wear a hat to protect your scalp from getting burnt.

Hire a professional mover

Sit back and relax in the air conditioning while professional movers do all the work. Professional movers are trained to take care of themselves in extreme temperature. There won’t be any risk of you overheating or even breaking a sweat.

Learn more about Bekins professional moving services.

 

References: Mayo Clinic, News Medical 

 

 

Temporary Relocation

Simplifying Your Temporary Move

Whether you’re moving to graduate school or teaching abroad, temporary moves can be tricky. You don’t want to bring your childhood stuffed animal or large antique dresser, but you just can’t throw them away, either. What should you do?

If you’re preparing to embark on an adventure without all your belongings, use our tips below. We’ll help you navigate your journey and make the most of the process.

Step 1: Get Organized to Simplify Packing

Packing for any type of move is stressful, so pack in an organized fashion to make your temporary move much smoother. First, find or buy more moving boxes than you think you’ll need. That way you won’t have to stop halfway through packing if you run out. Next, tape up your boxes and label each box as one of three things:

  • Take
  • Store
  • Throw Awaya box full of clothes to be donated.

Go through your rooms one at a time and sort everything into boxes labeled as one of these three categories. When you fill a box, put it in a designated corner in your living room and start a new one. Don’t leave the room you’re packing until everything is boxed up. Pretty soon your living room will have three different corners filled with organized boxes.

When you’re packing this way, it’s important to be ruthless. All those old college textbooks you’ve been carrying around need to get tossed for good. Plan to pack less than you can technically bring with you in your Take boxes, and you’ll probably pack exactly what you need.

Step 2: Find a Temporary Tenant

If you plan to move back into the house or condo you own, secure a temporary tenant for the time you’ll be gone. It might be a risk to arrange a month-to-month lease since your tenant can technically terminate at any time, but you won’t be homeless if you decide to come back earlier than planned.

You can also hire a property management company to manage any landlord duties while you’re away. They’ll collect rent and handle rental-agreementcomplaints and maintenance tickets for you.

Step 3: Find Temporary Housing in Your New Area

Long-term housing is often easier to find than temporary housing. As a result, when you’re looking for temporary housing in your new city, state, or country, you might have to think outside the box. Can you find a room to rent through websites like Air BNB? Is anyone from your program moving with you? See if you can move in together to cut costs.

If your stay is quite short, you can always book a room in a long-term hotel.

Step 4: Forward Your Mail

The US Post Office makes mail forwarding simple-you just need to fill out their online form. The process costs a dollar or slightly more, so have your credit card handy.

You can forward your mail in 6-month increments. Just remember to revisit the website and extend your mail forwarding after 6 months if you’re staying longer than that.

Step 5: Store Your Belongings

This should be your final step before you fly out. Be sure to label all boxes by room so they’re easier to unpack when you return.

To stay organized and make the process easier, hire a moving company. Plus, some moving companies offer storage units along with their moving services. You can simplify your move Economy Moversby hiring one company to take care of both tasks.

If you live alone in an apartment, you’ll only need a 10 x 10 unit. If you have a family or a house full furniture, plan to rent a unit that’s at least 10 x 20. If you’re leaving your car, you can park it in the unit, too.

If you follow these tips, your temporary move will be much less stressful. Call a moving company to get started on your new adventure.

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10 Ways to Pack for Your Next Move on the Cheap

When planning a move on a tight budget, the last thing you want is to spend money on expensive packing materials. To help you pinch your pennies, this list will spark your creative problem-solving skills and save you money while packing for your next move.

1. Never Buy Boxes You Can Have for Free

Before you buy boxes for your move, look around your community for used boxes that people no longer want. Many businesses receive weekly inventory shipments, so they have an overabundance of cardboard boxes. These boxes may be yours, if you only ask.

Here are a few places you can ask for boxes in your area:

  • Online Classified Ads – Many people that have recently moved want to give away their moving boxes.
  • Home Appliance Retailers – Big stores like Walmart, Target, and Best Buy often have large boxes for items like fridges, washers, and electronics.
  • Grocery Stores – Grocery stores often have plenty of spare boxes. If you find old produce boxes, make sure they are dry and sturdy before you bring them home.

2. Pack Heavy Objects in Liquor Boxes

Wooden liquor boxes are designed to carry heavy glass bottles and cans, which makes perfect boxes for moving your heavier belongings. These crate-style boxes often come with handles, which also makes them easy to carry.

Ask the staff at your local liquor store if they would be willing to give you their used boxes, or at least sell them to you at a discounted price.

3. Use Clothing to Pack Breakables

Instead of buying bubble wrap, cover fragile or easily-scratched items with clothing. Delicate items could include silverware, plates, picture frames, and ceramics.

Line your boxes with your sweaters, pajamas, and other soft clothing before you pack your breakable items into boxes. This method not only saves you on packing material, but it also saves you packing space. You won’t have to pack your clothing in separate boxes, and you won’t have to throw away countless piles of bubble wrap after your move.

4. Pack Your Glasses and Stemware in Clean Socks

While sweaters and pajamas work well for larger, yet delicate, items, they don’t do as well for glasses and stemware. Fortunately, clean socks make perfect impromptu covers for packing glassware. Just slip each of your glasses into a sock and pack them snuggly into packing boxes. The socks will act as a buffer to keep them from clinking together during the move.

5. Use Dollar Store Balloons as Packing Materials

Instead of using expensive air-pillow packing materials, buy a few packs of balloons from the dollar store. Partially inflate the balloons and use them to fill open space in your boxes. Balloons absorb impact without popping as long as you don’t over inflate them. You can buy various balloon shapes to fill up different sized gaps in your boxes so your items stay secure.

6. Line the Sides of Your Boxes with Egg Cartons

Egg cartons are strong and lightweight. Take advantage of their design by using egg cartons to buffer the insides of your boxes. Egg cartons can take a beating, so they add a layer of protection for your belongings during the move.

7. Use Shredded Paper Instead of Packing Peanuts

Give your paper shredder another purpose in life. Use your shredded documents as filling for your boxes instead of packing peanuts. Shredded paper is good packing filler that would otherwise go to waste.

8. Put All Your Containers to Good Use

Gather your baskets, hampers, and luggage and pack them full of your things. This will cut down the number of boxes you will need for your move. You can also pack heavier items in your wheeled luggage to make it easier to move. Watch the weight, though! You don’t want to break your wheels by rolling around a shelf’s worth of books.

9. Sell Bulky, Unwanted Items on the Internet

You can cut packing and moving costs by selling some of your big, unwanted items before you move. If you have old items you can easily replace, don’t waste money moving them. Instead list them on a local classified site and pocket the proceeds. The fewer things you have to move, the less you will pay to pack them.

10. Donate Your Other Unwanted Things

Collect remaining items in good condition but that you aren’t able to sell. Bring the items to a local charity or give them to your friends. If you donate them, you may be able to write off the value on your taxes.

Follow these 10 simple tips to save money while packing for your move. The money you save may help you stay within your moving budget. And since these tips encourage re-purposing household items and reusing boxes, you can also help the environment by relying less on new materials.

old-couple-boxes

How to Take the Stress Out of Your Moving Process

You might be really excited about your new home, new job, or other changes happening in your life. But you have to admit: you don’t love the idea of packing up all your items and hauling them into a moving van.

On top of all the time and effort you’ll spend, you risk injury by transporting furniture and other heavy objects.

You can make your household moving process easier by hiring a moving professional or using the following tips to help make a plan and to safely lift heavy objects.

How to Get Started

Even if you are in a rush, think ahead before you start grabbing boxes. Wear comfortable, closed-toed shoes and clothing you can flex in. Decide what path you will take to move each object and make sure there are no obstacles in your way.

Consider the weight of each object before you lift it. Professional movers estimate that a piece of furniture weighs about 7 pounds for every cubic foot (up to 10 pounds for sturdier materials). You increase your chance of injury by lifting items over 50 pounds, so you may want to leave those extra heavy objects to the professionals.

Depending on your size and strength, you will most likely need help from another person or moving equipment for some large pieces of furniture. You can use the following equipment to help lift heavy objects:

A stair roller. This metal device attaches to a single step and features a rolling bar in which heavy objects can glide over,allowing you to quickly slide heavy items down the stairs. Stair rollers are used most often for IMG_8260moving pianos.

Moving blankets or pads. With a moving blanket, you barely have to lift the heavy object. Slide the blanket underneath your furniture or appliance and pull. Use the moving blankets to cushion your products in the moving truck afterward.

Furniture sliders. These tools have a plastic base and foam pad that conform to the shape of your furniture. They work like moving blankets; you put one slider under each leg and push the item across your floor.

A dolly. Dollies come in two types: one that stands upright with two wheels and one with a flat base supported by four wheels. Either type can help you move multiple items at a time.

Tips for Heavy Lifting

After you have a plan 7- heavy boxand all the equipment you need, all that’s left to do is to start lifting. Be kind to your body, and use the following proper lifting techniques:

  • Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart. Keep one foot slightly ahead of the other for balance.
  • Don’t bend your back; instead bend with your hips and knees. Keep your shoulders back, your back straight, and your head up.
  • Straighten your hips and knees to lift the object.
  • Hold the load close to your waist, around your belly button. This method works better than just gripping the object with your hands. Never lift an item above shoulder level.
  • Don’t twist or lean when lifting an object. Move your feet to turn.
  • Squat once more with your hips and knees to set down your load, then position your load after you have put it down.

By following this method or by hiring a professional mover, you won’t put as much stress on your back and spine, and you can avoid injury.

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Don’t Chip the Glasses or Crack the Plates: How to Pack Your Kitchenware

Few things are more stressful during a move than packing the items in your kitchen. Delicate stemware, bulky pots and pans and an over abundance of Tupperware are difficult to box up without breaking a few plates along the way.

So what can you do to keep your kitchen ware safe before your next adventure? These tips and tricks will start you on the right track.

Protect Your Glasses
glass pack sm Cups, goblets, stemware and sundae glasses have awkward shapes and are easy to break, especially if they’re made of glass or fine crystal. To keep your glasses from chipping, use a divided box designed for shipping wine and liquor bottles. If you can’t find a divided box, carefully line a small box with bubble-wrap to protect your glasses.

Once you’ve found the right box, grab your largest and widest cup and lightly line the outside and inside with newspaper or packing paper. This reinforces the glass sides.

Repeat the lining process with your second cup, and then place it inside the first cup. Continue placing each glass inside the ones before it until you can’t insert anymore (you’ll likely fit three or four glasses in each group before running out of room).

Place these glasses in their separate cells, and when the box is full, cushion the top with tissue paper and use bubble-wrap to fill in the gaps. Seal the box and mark it as “fragile.”

Pack Your Plates
As with cups and glasses, you can find cardboard boxes specifically for packing plates. These boxes, also known as dish packs, are stronger and thicker than the average cardboard box. This enables them to absorb shock and protect your dishes. Your local agent can provide dish packs at a competitive price.

When you’re ready, put a plate on a sheet of newspaper. Place a thin sheet of bubble-wrap on the top of the plate. The bubble- wrap should be just big enough to cover the surface of the plate.

Place the next plate on top, with another sheet of bubble-wrap. Repeat the process until you have three stacked plates, then use the newspaper to wrap the entire set. Seal the package with tape; then stack the wrapped plates on their side in the box(rather than stacking them flat).

Continue placing plates in the box until you fill it. Use packing peanuts and crumpled paper to fill in any gaps. As with the cups, you’ll want to mark this box as “fragile.”

Manage Pots and Pans
Pots and pans are sturdier than glassware, so you can use a generic large box to pack these items. Line the box with styrofoam packing peanuts, and moving-boxes-mediumyou’ll be ready to pack.

With pots and pans, you’ll want to use the same technique you used with your cups. Start with your largest pan (without its lid), and line it with newspaper or bubble-wrap. Then, nestle your smaller pan inside. When you’ve nested three pans together, use newsprint and packing paper to wrap the three together.

Place the bunch in the bottom of the box and fill in the gaps with newspaper. If you have lids for your pans, wrap them individually and place them in the sides of the box. Mark the box as “Kitchenware” or “Pans” to help you stay organized.

Don’t Forget the Silverware
Because silverware and utensils are sturdy, you maybe tempted to toss them last minute in the bottom of another kitchen box. However, forks and knives have pointy, sharp edges that could injure you or your movers if handled incorrectly.

To prevent injury, roll forks and knives in tissue paper first before packing them away into a box. If your utensils are genuine silverware, do not wrap them in newsprint – this tarnishes your silverware.

If your knives are part of a chopping block, use tape on all sides of the block to hold the knives in. Cover the entire block with packing paper, and mark the package as “knives” so you remember to handle them with care.

What to Do With Tupperware
Tupperware and other food storage containers stack easily and resist damage. Unlike other dishes, they don’t need a bubble-wrap lining because they are plastic.

If you’ve acquired an extensive amount of Tupperware and similar containers over the years, they can add to the clutter of your move. To simplify the process, sort through and discard any items that you won’t need. Make sure each container has its own lid, and throw away any containers that are extensively stained or worn.

Once you’ve decided what to keep, stack your containers in the same way you’d stack your cups: nest each small container in a large container (without their lids). Put the stacked Tupperware in the box, and then place their corresponding lids along the sides of the box.

Of course, this is a lot of work. If this isn’t for you and you would like to have someone else do it for you, Bekins offers various packing services for your moving needs.

Need Additional Advice? These tips and tricks will help you pack your kitchenware safely. For more household moving tips and tricks, don’t be afraid to ask your local Bekins agent for advice.

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Don’t Lift That: Items to Leave to the Household Movers

Still debating about whether to hire a professional to move your household goods? Even if you feel comfortable moving boxes and furniture yourself, some objects are harder to manage. By lifting these items without proper training or tools, you not only risk physical strain but also irreversible damage to an expensive item. It’s better to call in a team of professional movers to lift the following items:

Piano Whether you own an upright or a grand piano, you should hire a moving company to get your instrument in and out of the house. Pianos have an irregular shape and hundreds of working parts. To keep your piano functional and elegant, find a mover specialized in handling these circumstances.

Pool Table Moving a pool table definitely isn’t fun and games. Depending on the model you own, your pool table could weigh between 500 to 1,000 pounds. As you search for a moving company, ask whether the movers will transport pool tables and what their process is for doing so. Many movers will disassemble your table first to prevent damage.

Hot Tub You may have moved your hot tub around the backyard, but moving it to a new home is a different story. Ask your moving company what steps to take beforehand. You’ll likely need to drain the hot tub and remove the equipment pack. Then leave the rest to the professionals.

Fragile Non-valuables We recommend keeping your most iDSCF3289rreplaceable valuables with you. That includes jewelry, special collections, and family heirlooms. Even though movers use the utmost care, you don’t want to risk damaging those items. However, an expert, with years of experience, can better protect your mirrors, china, glassware, artwork, and other delicate items with special packaging. While you may want to oversee the handling of these precious items, leaving the packing and moving of them to the professionals is the safest way to go.

Remember, above all else, that moving isn’t a job you have to undertake alone. Hire a professional mover. Enlist friends and special equipment. Whatever your plan, know you can ease the burden of heavy objects-and the stresses of moving-with a little help.

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Frequently Asked Questions about Packing

Once you have hired a moving service, you will have to decide whether to purchase additional services, and one of those services is packing. Packing is a tedious task that can be done for you, or you can do it yourself. Regardless of what you choose, here is the compiled a list of frequently asked questions when it comes to packing.

What packing services does Bekins offer?

Bekins offers a variety of packing services:

  •  Full-service packing, crating and unpacking
  •  Packing only difficult and/or fragile items
  •  Special packing for sensitive home electronics
  • Advice and quality packing materials

Of course, you can pack you own belonging and Bekins agent can offer suggestions and a full line of packing materials at competitive rates.

All Bekins movers are trained to handle your belongings with the utmost care and attention. To obtain packing materials including boxes, your local Bekins agent can provide these at competitive rates.

Can I leave the items in my dresser drawers?
Yes, you can leave clothing in your dresser drawers if your shipment will not need storage. If you will need storage at one of Bekins’ agencies, we recommend that all items in your dresser drawers be packed. We also recommend that all non-clothing items be packed, regardless of your storage needs.

Will the mover load the boxes that I packed?
Yes, the driver will load the boxes that you packed as long as the driver deems them safe for transport. Please note, the liability coverage for boxes that you pack yourself is not the same as the liability coverage available to you for carrier-packed boxes.

Can I pack and move my plants?
Typically, it is not advisable to move your plants. Most professional movers will only accept plants if the shipment is not going more than 150 miles and/or delivery will be within 24 hours. In addition, if you are moving across state lines, check with federal and state regulations for quarantines or other restrictions. Several states even require that plants be inspected and declared “pest free.”

What items cannot be packed?
Bekins wants your belongings to arrive at your new home safe and sound.

That means not moving certain items. Aerosol cans and hazardous materials are unsafe for transportation on a moving van. In addition, perishable items and those of personal importance are recommended for your individual transport. Read our comprehensive list of What Not to Pack.

How should I move my jewelry aDSCF3144nd other valuable items?
Bekins recommends you do not pack or ship your fine jewelry, precious metals, important papers (titles, tax forms, bank books, deeds, etc.), medical and dental records, prescriptions, coins, currency, stock certificates, notes or bonds. These items should be carried with you during your move.

How should I prepare my appliances?
All major appliances (washer, dryer, refrigerator, freezer, stoves, etc.) should be properly disconnected before the mover’s arrival. An authorized service firm can disconnect and prepare each appliance for transport. All refrigerators and freezers should be defrosted, cleaned and dried before the movers arrive. For more information, visit our how to move appliances page.

Will Bekins move my automobile?
Yes, Bekins has the capability to transport your automobile. There are several options for this service, including in-van service or use of a third-party carrier. If you elect to use in-van service, your automobile will be transported on a Bekins moving truck with your household goods. You can also elect to use a third-party carrier to transport your vehicle. Whichever option you choose, your local Bekins agent can arrange this service for you.

How will my mirrors and pictures be protected and packed?
Your local Bekins agent can pack all of your mirrors and pictures using specially designed cartons and wrapping materials to provide maximum protection for your goods.

What type of protection options do my belongings have during transport?
Bekins offers different levels of valuation options for your belongings. These options are not insurance, but provide for protection of your goods during shipping. Learn more about Bekins Valuation options.

More packing resources:

Bekins Packing Guide

Bekins Moving Checklist

Bekins Printable Labels