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Tips to Protect Your Flooring During a Move

After months of searching for a new home, you’ve finally found one with enough room to accommodate everyone. You wanted the house to look picture-perfect, so you applied a fresh coat of paint to each room and even installed new carpet and hardwood flooring.

But now that moving day has arrived, you realize that your flooring may be in danger. Sturdy work boots could track in dirt and stain your carpet fibers. Heavy furniture legs could scuff and scratch your cedar planking.

So what can you do to ensure your flooring looks pristine after the move?

IMG_8245If You Have Carpet

Shag carpet and area rugs can snag on moving boxes and unravel faster than you can blink. And carpet with shorter pile can still pull away from the edges if exposed to heavy foot traffic.

The following techniques will provide an extra layer of protection for your carpet.

Invest in Self-adhesive Carpet Film IMG_8233

You can purchase carpet plastic online for a fairly affordable price. Much like plastic wrap for your food, this carpeting covering will stick to the carpet and keep out dirt and debris. To prevent injury, you’ll want a plastic that provides a non-slip surface for your moving team.

Place Cardboard in Heavy Traffic Areas

Although carpet film will resist some degree of tearing, it won’t hold up well over frequent use. If you have movers following the same path through the living room to individual bedrooms, you’ll likely want a little extra cushion for these high-traffic areas. Cardboard will shield your carpet from mud and water, but like plastic it can create a slippery surface, so you’ll want to secure it in place with adhesives.

Wear Shoe Booties

If you worry about dust, dirt, and grass stains more than crushing carpet pile, you can encourage everyone who helps you move to put on shoe covers whenever they enter your home. Since you likely will only want shoe covers for the first few days of moving, you should buy a large pack of cheap, disposable booties rather than one or two expensive, longer-lasting covers.

If You Have Hardwood

Although hardwood flooring offers a great deal of durability and scratch-resistance, it won’t stay immune to dents or damage if you drop a heavy refrigerator or table.

To prevent gouges in your flooring, try these three tips.

Protecting the floor with paperLine Bedrooms with Paper

In areas with little foot traffic, you’ll want to line the floor with kraft paper to help the space stay clean and minimize scratching. Keep in mind that you’ll want plain, uncolored kraft paper, as colored paper and similar items may leach their dyes into your flooring.

You can also place cardboard on top of the paper for extra protection.

Lay Plywood in the Kitchen and Living Room

If you plan to move heavy furniture, such as a large TV or washing machine, you’ll want more protection than cardboard and paper can provide. If you drop the appliance, the force from the corner could easily dig past the cardboard and into your wooden tiles.

So, lay a thin sheet of plywood over your flooring before your movers arrive. Since plywood can have a few rough edges of its own, you’ll want to use it in conjunction with cardboard and paper.

Apply Furniture Sliders to Chair and Table LegsFurniture Sliders

Once the movers have gone, you’ll likely still need to move your table and chairs now and again to clean the floor or to simply fit your arrangement better. To prevent future scratches, apply furniture sliders to chair and table legs. These soft pieces of fabric will form a protective barrier between the chair and the floor, and they’ll help your table glide more smoothly when you need to shift its position.

Need Additional Tips?

These are just a few techniques you can implement on moving day to protect your home. For more tips, check our blog regularly. We’ll keep you posted on the best ways to make moving as simple and stress free as possible.

Labeling Boxes

How to Prepare Your Belongings for Temporary Storage

Whether you’re in the process of moving or your office is in the middle of a renovation, temporary storage is something to consider with all of your moving and storage options. It provides a safe place for you to store your belongings until it is convenient for you to finish moving.

In general, there are two types of temporary storage: an on-site unit kept at a moving company’s facility and a portable unit that you can have delivered to your new home at a time that is best for you.

Temporary storage can simplify your moving process. But haphazardly shoving things into boxes and dumping them into your unit could cause stress and frustration. Follow these steps to organize your packing and your unit.

Choose a Unit to Fit Your Needs

No matter if it’s a stationary unit or a portable unit, you want to select an appropriate size. A unit that is too big will end up costing more while a unit that is too small will make it difficult for you to fit everything. As a general rule of thumb, choose a unit that is a little Economy Moversbigger than what you actually need to help cut down on expense and stress.

If choosing the right size seems a little daunting, talk with your moving company. They can tell you approximately what size you will need based on what you plan to store. For example, furniture will take up more space than boxes of files, so your size decision will depend on what you need to temporarily store.

Pack Wisely

Because this is temporary storage, you don’t need to worry about taking special care to prepare your things for a long-term stay. However, you still want to protect your belongings so they aren’t damaged.

When packing your boxes, avoid stuffing too much in them or else the box might break. Invest in bubble wrap, furniture covers, and other packing materials to ensure your possessions arrive safely to the unit and then safely back to your home or office. To help with packing, defrost your fridge and freezer, drain your lawn mower and other machinery of fuel, and remove batteries from your devices. These extra precautions will keep your possessions safe.

As you pack, remember to label your boxes so you know what’s in them. This will make it easier for you to locate items in your unit later on. You can save yourself some time by deciding which boxes you will need access to during the transition period and grouping them accordingly. DSCF0301Then, when you pack your car or truck, you can put the boxes that you want at the front of your unit and the ones you won’t need at the back.

Remember to leave anything perishable or flammable out of your unit. Your moving company might have a few other restrictions on what you can store, so ask them if they have any specific regulations. Some companies might even pack and load your things for you.

Know Where Everything Is

To make a temporary situation even easier, you can create a diagram showing where everything in your unit is. This will save you time if you need to get something from your unit before moving day. If you’re planning on keeping only some of your possessions in the unit, you can also make a list of everything you have in your unit so you know what’s there and what is still in your car, hotel room, or elsewhere.

Take advantage of the convenience of temporary storage and the stress it will save you. By organizing and preparing your belongings, you will be able to save time and worry less. This will keep your possessions safe during a transition to a new home or a remodel at your office.

Infographic: Countdown to a successful move

You are moving and you have so much to do with so little time. Don’t panic! The best way to combat the stress of moving is to organize and set deadlines of when to accomplish everything on your to-do list.

Below is a countdown infographic to help achieve a successful move with less stress.

Countdown to a successful move - Bekins

 

For useful moving tips and tricks, please visit Bekins Van Lines website. If you have any questions about your upcoming move, talk to your local Bekins agent.

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Office Moving

Stay Cool During your Summer Move

It’s hot outside and you feel as if you can cut the humid air with a knife and are just dreading the thought of packing and loading all of your stuff. Not only is this uncomfortable, but moving in the heat could be dangerous if you don’t take precautions. Below are some tips to stay safe in the heat during your move.

Stay Hydrated 

Your body will need more water to stay hydrated and keep your core body temperature where it needs to be. Drink 5-7 ounces of fluids every 15 to 20 minutes to replenish the necessary fluids in your body. Beverages with electrolytes will keep yourself energized, waterbut avoid energy drinks.

Also, eat foods that will give your energy while not dehydrating you. Instead of foods with high sodium content (salt) opt for fruits, vegetables, nuts and protein to help get you through the day. Also avoid caffeine and alcohol which can speed up dehydration.

AC on both ends of the move

If possible, don’t turn off your electricity in your new home until the day after you move, and schedule the power to be turned on in your new home a day before you move in. That way, you will be able to use your air conditioning during loading and delivery. If you don’t have air conditioning, consider buying fans to keep you cool keep during your move.

Dress Appropriately

Dress in a light colored t-shirt and in shorts to help keep cool. Lighter clothes will improve your circulation during the move, which helps prevent heat stroke and heat exhaustion. If the temperature is very hot, dampen a towel or cloth in cold water and place it on top of your shoulders. This may sound uncomfortable, but it will help keep your core body temperature down.

Take Breaks

It’s hard to do, especially when moving, but try not to over exert yourself. Rest frequently in a cool spot. Try to move items either early morning or later in the day when it may be cooler.

SunscreenWear sunscreen

Use a sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15. Apply the sunscreen over exposed skin and reapply every two hours, especially if you are sweating profusely. It is also a good idea to wear a hat to protect your scalp from getting burnt.

Hire a professional mover

Sit back and relax in the air conditioning while professional movers do all the work. Professional movers are trained to take care of themselves in extreme temperature. There won’t be any risk of you overheating or even breaking a sweat.

Learn more about Bekins professional moving services.

 

References: Mayo Clinic, News Medical 

 

 

Attractive young adult couple lying on home floor with coffee cups smiling and looking at blueprints.

Preparing to Move Into your Larger Home

If you’ve spent years in a small apartment or modest home, you already understand the limits of space more than those who live in a larger home.

Of course, some people prefer a small space. But if your family or employment needs change, you may decide to move to a new city and a larger home. Just imagine how much easier your life will be when you actually have room for your current belongings!

However, upsizing holds a few challenges as well as rewards. The more you understand what a larger space means for you, the better you can prepare-not just for moving day, but for all the days afterward.

Downsize Your Belongings a box full of clothes to be donated.

If you want to really enjoy your large new home, cut the clutter before you arrive. Even though everything you currently own will easily fit in your new place, that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t purge some belongings before the movers arrive. There’s no point in paying your movers to box up the books you never read or pack the faded drapes that don’t match your new décor.

Additionally, too much junk is a challenge no matter your home’s size. Even if you have ample room in your new house, you won’t feel much like sorting out the junk once you arrive. Do it now instead.

Prepare Ahead to Save Money in a Larger Space

Although you may be tempted to buy more furnishings right away, resist the temptation to overspend. Unpack a little at a time and see how your current belongings look and feel in your new space.

Also, since you’ve only seen your furnishings in the context of a smaller home, it will take time to adjust to the bare walls and emptier-than-normal rooms. Allow yourself several weeks to simply live with your new environment before you consider adding more furniture or other belongings. Even then, be judicious with new purchases so you stay within your budget.

Depending oMoving Inn your new home’s size, you’ll probably spend more on electricity and gas bills each month. This is another reason to avoid buying new furniture and other accessories right away. When you’re adjusting to a new mortgage payment and higher energy costs, you’ll need to avoid unnecessary purchases for a while.

Adjust Slowly to Your Surroundings

Don’t expect to feel at home right away. It’s normal to feel some anxiety at first.

To combat these unsettled feelings, try to create as much of a normal routine as you can. Take your dogs for a walk to explore the neighborhood. Set up your kitchen in a similar pattern to your old kitchen-at least for a while. Have dinner at the same time as usual.

Remember, too, that you’ve already lived for a long time without those extra closets. There’s no need to fill them just because they exist. As time goes by, you’ll be open to creative ideas for them and other areas in your new home. Besides, not every space must be filled.

If all the open space starts to bother you, just remind yourself about how long it took to pack everything prior to the move. This thought should settle you while you slowly adjust to a bigger home.

If your budget allows for it, make yourself feel more at home by painting the spare bedroom a new color or switching out a bathroom fixture. These smaller, budget-friendly choices help you invest in each new space without automatically filling it with more belongings.

Before long, you’ll enjoy the extra space around you. In the meantime, keep all the best “small home” habits so you feel relaxed, not intimidated, in your larger home.

For more tips about preparing for your move-or adjusting to it after the big day-visit our Bekins blog again soon.

homeforsale

Selling Your Home Before You Move

When you move across the state, or even across the country, you can give your family countless opportunities for growth and exploration. But before you pack up your things and call your local moving company, you need to sell your old home-and fast!

Unfortunately, selling a home takes time. Sometimes houses can stay on the market for months, or even years. If you don’t prepare your home for resale, you may deter future buyers and prolong that time.

So what can you do to speed the process?

Improve the look and feel of your residence with the following suggestions.

Make a Great First ImpressionEntryway

First impressions make or break sales. When people pull up to your driveway, they need to feel welcome and comfortable.

To create a positive experience, inspect your home’s siding. If you notice peeling panels or grungy stains, apply a fresh coat of paint before the showing. Also, a good wash can work wonders for the look of your home. Power wash the exterior to remove stains, dirt, and other buildup.

Trim the Trees

The quality of your surrounding landscape affects the overall appearance of your home. Stray weeds and dead grass will age your home and decrease its value. So trim the hedges and trees, mow the lawn, and add some flowers for warmth and beauty.

Set the Mood with Lighting

Lighting sets a mood and makes the details of your home easier to see. Ensure that each light fixture works well, and put in some new bright bulbs. Also, open curtains and blinds to let in more natural light. A bright home feels more welcoming and open.

kitchen appliances

Photo via http://bit.ly/118yly3

Clean the Kitchen

Many homeowners spend a great deal of time in the kitchen, so they often come to this room first when inspecting your home’s interior. Even if your kitchen isn’t roomy or gadget-filled, you can still impress buyers by keeping it clean and functional.

Replace burners that don’t work, scrub grease and smears off the cabinets, and update any worn appliances.

Follow Your Nose

The smells in a home do much more than influence aesthetic appeal. Odors relate closely to health and sanitation. When your buyers take that first whiff of your home, you want it to smell fresh and clean.

If your home smells musty, air it out for a few hours before your buyers come to view it. Consider burning some scented candles or spraying some air freshener, too.

blog.builddirect.com

blog.builddirect.com

Add a Personal Touch

Your home should put your buyers at ease, and adding your personal touch can do just that. Although you may feel tempted to pack everything away and let your movers handle the storage, place a few strategic pieces of tasteful décor throughout your home to bring out its best features.

Avoid displaying family memorabilia and photos, as these will make it look as though you still plan to live in your current home.

You want your home to look classy but open to future changes in design. And you want to leave enough empty space for your buyers to imagine their own furniture designs and layouts.

Remember a Little Goes a Long Way

Walk through your home as if you were doing so for the first time. Contemplate what features are most desirable for a new home and decide what needs a little loving care. A few repairs and upgrades can transform your home from a fixer-upper to a keeper.

You may need to spend a little extra money to create these finishing touches, but the payoff will be worth it when your buyers eagerly sign those papers for their new home.

Baby Relocating

Moving with your Infant: 7 Ways to make it Safe & Easy

Have an infant but need to relocate?

Don’t worry. You can achieve a safe and easy move even with your small child in tow. From advanced planning to packing and basic moving tips, the following guide covers everything you need to complete your move with a happy, healthy, and cared-for baby.

Before the Move

Advanced planning is an absolute must when you have an infant. In addition to your regular moving to-dos, add these items to your list:

  1. Create a Meal Plan

Packing boxes and organizing transportation is no easy feat. You might struggle to find time to feed your baby, let alone time to feed yourself. So before your move, take the time to plan a few simple meals to keep up your energy levels. Stick with simple foods you can take on the go, like sandwiches and trail mix.

  1. Book a Babysitter

You and your significant other can take turns packing and watching the baby, but you’ll Moving with a baby 2definitely need help on moving day. You don’t want to worry about your child crawling under foot or crying unnoticed in the corner as you load boxes into the truck.

So hire a professional service, or ask a friend or family member help. Make sure your sitter knows the right date and time, and give plenty of advanced notice. If you worry your go-to sitter might not be available, ask a back-up babysitter to help, just in case.

  1. Find a Pediatrician

Your baby could get sick before, en route, or once you’ve arrived at your new place. To avoid a stressful situation, find a good pediatrician before your move. Ask around, read reviews, and visit your child’s new doctor.

Also, keep copies of your child’s medical records on hand, or mail them in advance to the pediatrician. This way you can keep your child up-to-date on his or her immunizations despite the move.

During the Move

Now that you’ve planned your entire move, it’s time to prepare you and your baby for the official moving day.

  1. Put Together aMoving In Travel Case of Baby Essentials

Think everything you use to care for your baby day and a night. Since moving services may deliver your items before or after you arrive, you’ll want to keep certain essentials with you. This could include:

  • Diapers and wipes
  • Diaper rash ointment
  • Changing pad
  • Changes of clothes
  • Toys and snacks
  • Plenty of baby food
  • First-aid kit
  • Plastic bags for trash
  • Stroller
  • Portable crib
  • One or two blankets
  • Sunscreen

Although packing these items can sometimes seem look more hassle than its worth, you’ll be happy you have them during an emergency.

  1. Take Extra Time En Route

If you are traveling to your new home via road trip or plane, realize that it will take extra time when you have an infant. Plan for frequent stops along the way for feeding, bathroom, or just to take a break.

Bring a noisemaker or recorded sounds that soothe your baby during the trip.

After the Move

Congratulations! You made it through the journey to your new hoSmallerme. But you’re not finished yet.

  1. Enjoy Your First Meal in Your New Home

Upon arrival, plan for an easy takeout meal on the kitchen floor. You can turn this into a fun picnic by spreading a blanket out and taking your meal together with some paper napkins.

  1. Catch Up on Your Sleep

After you’ve eaten and fed your infant, take a few minutes to unpack your basic essentials. This could include a few blankets to sleep on, or finding your toothbrush in your toiletries bag. From there, do what’s necessary to settle in and enjoy your first night in your new home.

If you can, try to remain consistent with your infant’s sleep schedule. Soon you and your family will adjust to your new home and new routine.

Attractive young adult couple lying on home floor with coffee cups smiling and looking at blueprints.

The Hidden Costs of Moving

So you have taken the plunge and decided to move. This is a big step, and one worthy of congratulation. But with this exciting step forward comes a lot of costs-some expected, some unexpected.

No matter what your housing situation, planning a move turns out to be an expensive endeavor. By this point, you have looked carefully at mortgage rates, rent costs, moving company deposits and so forth. But what you may not have considered are some of the smaller costs of moving.

Whether you are up sizing, downsizing, or just moving locations, these hidden costs can overwhelm your budget if you are not careful. As you budget your move, remember to keep the following hidden costs in mind.

Packing Supplies

Whether you are packing things up yourself or plan on hiring a professional moving Moving Incompany do the work, you will need boxes, bins, tape, bubble wrap, and markers. Some packing services take care of the supplies and include the cost in the final fee. Others don’t charge for labor and supplies, but may charge fees for extra packing boxes needed for added safety during the move. Either way, make sure you account for this cost.

Storing Possessions

Sometimes moves have unexpected delays. Closing on a house might take longer than anticipated, or previous tenants might not vacate the property on time. In such situations, the best solution is often to store your possessions until you are able to move in.

Prices for storage units vary, depending on size, climate control, and security measures. Though hopefully your move will go off without any delays, budget for storage for a few weeks in case you need to accommodate delays.

Managing Utility Accounts

Closing old utility accounts (including power, gas, phone, and internet) sometimes entails unforeseen fees. You will receive initial deposits from such accounts, thankfully. But often late fees or premature closing fees may make that deposit smaller than you had hoped.

Once settled in your new home, you will need to open new accounts. Opening new utility accounts often means paying deposits, set-up fees, etc.

You can prepare for both kinds of fees by calling utility companies weeks before the move. This will ensure that your accounts are square before the actual moving date.

Sleeping and Eating During the Move

Depending on how far you are moving and how you plan to get there, the actual move might include several days of travel.

As you plan, budget for transportation (gas, airplane tickets, bus tickets, parking fees, etc.). Also consider accommodations: will you be staying in a hotel in the days between moving out of your old home and into your new home? Account for food as well. If your move will take several days, you may be eating out until you have a kitchen again.

Getting SettledChecklist

Driver’s license fees, plate registration, opening or closing bank accounts or gym contracts: these all have hidden costs. When making a move across state lines especially, you will need to update many of these day-to-day contracts. You will have time once established in your new home to take care of such items, but prepare your budget for these updates as well.

Replacing Odds and Ends

If you are making a big move, you might be leaving behind (or throwing away) everyday items. For instance, cleaning supplies, baking goods, and other small fixtures you have accumulated might get left in your old house. Some items might also get lost or damaged in the move. Choose a reliable moving company to avoid this as much as possible, but anticipate replacing some odds and ends.

The best secret to reducing the budget-related stress of moving is to prepare. You may encounter unexpected situations as you relocate. By keeping these hidden costs in mind, though, such unexpected situations won’t surprise you.

For more moving advice, explore some of Bekins’ other blog posts.

Stress Free Zone

7 Ways to De-stress During a Move

In 1967, two psychiatrists developed a scale for measuring stress. According to their research, different life changes create different levels of stress in our bodies. If these stress levels get too high, we are more prone to injury and illness.

One of the stressors that Holmes and Rahe identified is a change in residence.

Right alongside that stressor are others, like a change in schools, a change in marital status, and a change in work responsibilities.

A move in and of itself may not cause overwhelming stress. But chances are if you’re moving, you are probably also making some other significant life changes as well. Collectively, these changes can produce a storm of stressors.

You may not be able to control the life changes that come your way. But the good news is that managing the stress they create is possible. Simple de-stressing activities can help you keep calm and healthy amidst the packing and planning you’ll be conquering in the coming months.

Keep a regular exercise routine

True, you might be lifting lots of heavy things, carrying items up and down staircases, and scrubbing walls and windows as you get ready to move. But don’t neglect keeping a regular exercise routine. Thirty minutes a day can greatly reduce stress and anxiety, not to mention help you maintain the energy and strength you’ll need for the big move.

Get regular sleep

If you’re moving in the middle of a change in work, the only hours you have to organize, pack, and clean might be late at night.

It’s okay to work late, but remember that your mind and body will work best when they have proper sleep. Try to keep a consistent bedtime so you can get the most out of your waking hours.

Eat a balanced dietAhealthyfooditems

With all the hustle and bustle of moving, it is easy to let good eating go. But your body needs nutrients to manage stress and maintain health. Include fresh vegetables, fruits, and plenty of drinking water in your daily eating.

Take time to play

Go for a walk, play a board game, or cook your favorite meal. Taking time away from the stressors often gives new clarity and energy. You’ll find that when you come back to the tasks at hand, you’ll be much better equipped to manage problems.

Breathe

Practice breathing deeply for a few minutes each day. You might sit on the ground or on a chair. Close your eyes and focus on inhaling and exhaling. Play some soothing music in the background if that helps.

ChecklistMake a to-do list

When you start getting overwhelmed by how many things still need doing, one of the best ways to get that stress off your shoulders is to write it all down. Take fifteen minutes and a pencil and paper. List all the tasks you need to do, small and large.

Then prioritize the tasks. Which must you do today? Which must you do this week? Writing out upcoming tasks and assigning a time for you to do each one will make the work ahead seem much more doable.

Stay on track with this moving checklist and timeline.

Surround yourself with nature

With all the time our brains and eyes spend on screens, a little bit of nature can go a long way to de-stress. Buy a plant. Find a nearby park. Sit outside and watch clouds. Having a few minutes alone with your thoughts and with nature will leave you feeling refreshed and ready to tackle the stress of moving.Walking

Find a hobby

The act of creating can do wonders for our stress levels. Whether you’re a knitter, a painter, or a model car maker, losing yourself in a new (or forgotten) hobby can alleviate anxiety and help you regain perspective. Even setting aside fifteen minutes a day for your hobby will establish a healthy, consistent pattern that you’ll find yourself enjoying more and more.

Now that you have the tools to de-stress, check out some of Bekins’ other blog posts to get more tips for a smooth, manageable move.

DSCF0326

Eat, Throw Away or Donate? What to Do with Your Food Supply Before Moving

When you’re in the hustle and bustle of moving preparations, you probably spend a lot of time decluttering. You hold a garage sale to get rid of the heavy old bookshelf and treadmill you never use. You strategize the best way to pack your craft collection.

But have you thought much about your pantry?

If you’re like most Americans, you probably have a decent store of canned goods and other non perishables hanging around your kitchen. And that doesn’t even approach all the food you have in your refrigerator and freezer.

You don’t like the idea of throwing food away, but you don’t want to pack stacks of canned goods in the moving van either.

Moving day isn’t far off-so you need a manageable strategy right now.

Complete a Food InventoryFridge

While you may keep a careful inventory of our furniture, books, and electronic devices, you probably forget about your food storage. If you don’t really buy a lot of excess food, congratulations. But if you believe in emergency supplies, you’ll need to do some counting and sorting.

To stay organized, divide your list into the following categories:

  • Frozen foods (meat, vegetables, ice cream, frozen entrées, etc.)
  • Perishable, refrigerated items (dairy products, eggs, vegetables and fruits, and condiments)
  • Foods in glass bottles (bottled fruit, drinks, olive oil, spaghetti sauce, and similar items)
  • Canned items (vegetables, fruits, soup, and so forth)
  • Boxed items (grains, cereals, and the like)
  • Plastic containers (containers for bulk foods like nuts, pasta or rice; and bottled water)
  • Food supplies in fragile containers (flour in paper sacks, bread loaves in plastic bags, etc.)

Plan for Your New Space

The best way to decide what to keep, eat, or throw away is to look ahead at your new home. Will you have more or less cupboard space there? Do you want to build up a new food supply once you arrive, or would you rather have a month’s supply of food already in place?

By asking yourself these questions now, you can better envision a food plan between now and then. Here are a few possible scenarios that could happen once you move into your new home:

  • If your new home has a pantry closet in addition to your kitchen cupboards, you may want to take more food with you.
  • If you need to downsize for your new place, consider a better division between food supplies and dishes. If you have too much of one or the other, you should probably give some things away before you move.
  • If you have a large family that goes through food quickly, you may want to move more food items with you. But pay attention to food costs vs. the cost of shipping. This can help you decide if moving all those cases of soup is really the best strategy.

pantryEat from Your Pantry for a Few Weeks

How much of your food supply can you use in your current menus? Be creative. Enlist the help of family members to decide what foods you can eat in advance.

In particular, try to use up items in glass jars. Glass is harder to protect during a move, so the fewer glass containers you have on moving day, the better. Do you really need all those glass jars of freezer jam? Consider donating any items you can’t eat before you move to neighbors and friends.

Of course, you have to be realistic when eating from your pantry. You may still have to stop by the store for a couple fresh ingredients. But you may surprise yourself when you see how many meals you can make completely from pantry foods. Don’t forget to use foods from your freezer as well.

Finally, get rid of expired goods before moving day. If you do your part ahead of time, you’ll still have what you need when you arrive at your new home-but without the hassle and expense of moving food items you didn’t have to.

Donate Your Leftovers

moveforhunger.org

moveforhunger.org

The cost of your move is based on weight plus distance of the move. Ways to cut back on your weight would be to get rid of food. Rather than throwing away non-perishable food, Bekins along with Move For Hunger make it easier than ever to donate your food.

Bekins Van Lines is a founding member of Move For Hunger. Participating local agents will pick up the unwanted, non-perishable food items and deliver it to their local food banks in the area. Your donation of food will not only save you money on your move, but will help feed a person or family in need.

Need more fresh moving tips? Browse our blog for other smart, low stress strategies before the big day.