Moving 101 – What’s an interstate moving agent?

The process of relocating your family is stressful enough without having to comprehend moving and storage vernacular. At Bekins, we recognize this and strive to make your moving experience as simple and stress-free as possible. One term you will hear from the beginning of the moving process is “interstate moving agent.” Here’s a definition of your local interstate moving agent and their role and responsibility with your relocation.

Moving companies, like Bekins Van Lines, have agents who represent them exclusively for interstate (state-to-state) moving. Agents are, for the most part, independently owned and operated. This is positive to consumers because each agent can customize their service offerings to the unique needs of their respective markets. For example, agents in large metropolitan areas, such as New York City or Chicago, have specialized equipment and experienced labor to safely move household goods from high rise apartments and maneuver through narrow streets. Agents also are connected to your community and have a vested interest in superior customer service because they live and work in your hometown.

In addition to representing their van line for interstate moving, many agents are diversified in other business segments related to the moving business. Some agents are involved in local moves and intrastate (within the state) moves.

Other services that agents may provide:

  • Storage in a professionally managed and secure warehouse
  • Mini-storage facilities
  • Office moving
  • Record storage and document management, including shredding
  • International moving (outside the United States)
  • Shipping of artwork, antiques, new furniture, cabinets and other specialized products needing special care and handling
  • Logistics and freight

With respect to the agent’s responsibilities on an interstate move, agents are classified as: booking agents, origin agents, destination agents and hauling agents. The definitions of each agent classification are as follows:

Booking agent
The booking agent is the agent who “booked” or “sold” you the moving services. They are responsible for providing the survey information, estimate and price, required interstate moving documentation, and will be your main point of contact throughout the move process. Often, but not always, the booking agent is located in your city of origin.

Origin agent
Usually, the booking agent and origin agent are one in the same. For example, if you are moving from Columbus, Ohio, you will more than likely book your move with the local Columbus agent who will also be responsible for providing services to you in Columbus. Origin services include packing, crating, providing labor for the driver and facilitating other specialized services that may be required during your move, such as third-party services (e.g., servicing appliances so they may be moved). The origin agent is the agent who performs these functions in the city in which you are leaving.

Destination agent
This is the agent who will be available for a myriad of services upon your arrival at your new location. These services include storage, unpacking and debris removal. Your booking agent will communicate with the destination agent to inform them of your move and any specific required services.

Hauling agent
Most agents provide interstate hauling services. In fact, in addition to your booking agent being the origin agent, they may also be your hauling agent. The hauling agents for the van line are agents who whose drivers load and transport your family’s belongings. These agent drivers are van line qualified and experienced in the art of professional household goods relocations.

With more than 370 agents to serve you, Bekins Van Lines and its vast agent network stand ready to serve your relocation needs. For a list of professional Bekins agents, visit

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One Comment to “Moving 101 – What’s an interstate moving agent?”
  1. Sonja Kirkham

    Very good site you have here but I was curious if you knew of any user discussion forums that cover the same topics discussed in this article? I’d really like to be a part of community where I can get advice from other knowledgeable individuals that share the same interest. If you have any recommendations, please let me know. Thanks!

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