Author Archives: Bekins Van Lines

Bekins Van Lines

About Bekins Van Lines

Bekins Van Lines is one of the oldest moving companies in the U.S. Offering both private and corporate relocation services as well as military moves, Bekins truly knows moving.

Smaller

5 Easy Ways to Make Moving Fun for Your Kids

Moving is stressful. So much to do, so much to plan, and so much to worry about. You can easily forget that your kids feel all the same things that you do, except they feel even more uncertain, and they don’t know what to do about it. However, you have many different ways to remedy this problem and even make moving fun for your kids. These tips are easy and inexpensive, and they work for kids of all ages.

  1. House-hunt together.skd273191sdc

Make your children feel like they have some say in where you live. If you can actually take them with you, turn the process into a quest or game, like bingo. On the bingo card, check off appealing features for each house you look including the number of bedrooms, a basketball hoop, a pool, etc.

If you can’t physically take your children house-hunting, take plenty of pictures to show them afterwards. Show them which room would be theirs, what the backyard looks like, and so on. Familiarizing them with the new house before the move will make the transition that much easier.

  1. Create a playlist.

Music keeps your kids happy and motivated. You can create one big playlist for the entire process, or you can even create a few playlists for each step: packing, driving, and unpacking. Compile a bunch of favorite songs or look for music that has to do with travel, saying goodbye, change, and so on. You can even make packing a sort of dance-just pack to the beat of the music.

  1. Create a contact book.

HomeworkYou have several options if you want to create a contact book, and you can decide which will work best for your child. Make a scrapbook and compile photos of places and friends, as well as email addresses and phone numbers.

If your children get a yearbook at the end of the school year, help them get their friends’ contact information along with well wishes and signatures. If your children are too young to put together a contact book themselves, have someone special to them do it, like their grandparents or a favorite babysitter.

  1. Pack a “treasure box”.

Have one box for each child. Your children can put their favorite things inside: blankets, books, stuffed animals, so on. They can even decorate the box with stickers and markers. Like with the contact book, if your children are too young to decorate themselves, have someone special decorate it for them.

Make sure this box stays with you instead of putting it in the moving truck. This way, your kids can open it first thing at the new house. You can even have the box in the car with your children so they can even have their favorite things with them on the journey. When you finally arrive at the new house, they’ll already have something special and familiar to make the place feel like home.

  1. Plan something fun.

    © Jen Grantham | jen@jengrantham.com

    © Jen Grantham | jen@jengrantham.com

Take everyone’s minds off the sadness of leaving friends behind and the fear of something new by doing something fun on the way there. Find an amusement park, a museum, a water park, a national park, or any other fun attractions that lies along your route. This tip doesn’t just apply to your kids either-you can enjoy it too. Just relax and have fun, and let the stress of the move float away for a couple hours.

Make the move an adventure, and include your kids in the process. You’ll be happier, they’ll be happier, and you’ll all be much more prepared to get accustomed to your new home.

old-couple-boxes

3 Strategies to Downsize Your Home Without Regret

When you downsize your home, it often feels like you’re downsizing your life. However, clearing your life of extra possessions can leave more room for what matters-people and experiences.

There are many ways you can sort your items to determine what to leave behind. However, going from the biggest and most obvious items down to the most sentimental is more manageable for many people. Read below to learn how to carry out this strategy during your next move.

1. If It Doesn’t Fit, You Don’t Need It
This strategy works best if you’ve already walked around your new place. Once you can gauge DSCF3144how big your new rooms are, you’ll have a better idea of what furniture you’ll need. You’ll also know which furniture items you’ll need to replace with smaller versions.

The main items to downsize in the furniture department are couches, shelves, and tables. If you are moving to a smaller home because all your kids are grown, do you really need a dining room table that seats eight? If you now live alone, do you need both a couch and a loveseat?

If you’re moving to a condo, apartment, or a smaller yard, you can apply this strategy to outdoor equipment as well. If you don’t need a riding lawnmower and it won’t fit in your new place, don’t keep it.

The key is to sell what doesn’t fit so you can put that money towards high-quality items that you will use and love. If you don’t need a full-size couch, you can indulge in a brand-new loveseat that will suit you much better.

2. Be Ruthless with Your Clothes
Most people have far more clothing than they ever wear. So how do you get rid of the extras? The simplest way is to use the three-box method. Label three boxes as “donate,” “trash,” and “keep.” If it has holes or deodorant stains, it goes in the trash. If you wear a shirt multiple times a month, keep it.

a box full of clothes to be donated.Your “donate” box is for clothing that you don’t actually wear. If you haven’t worn something in over a year, you probably won’t wear it ever again. Be ruthless-you’ve had plenty of chances to wear those pants, but you didn’t, so give it to someone who will.

Donating your clothes to a reputable charity can help you feel better about losing your belongings. A pair of dress pants you wore once can help someone get a job. A t-shirt you got for free can clothe a child in foster care.

Of course, you can feel free to exempt one-use only items like wedding dresses from ruthless purging.

3. Preserve Sentimental Belongings that Make You Happy
senior_downsizingWe all have belongings that mean something, whether they’re your grandmother’s china, your daughter’s baby clothes, or a stack of your child’s drawings. Sentimental items are the hardest to part with because of the emotions that they stand for.

This means that instead of being completely logical about it, you need to get your emotions involved if you want to part with them. Only hold on to things that make you feel happy, not things that bring up bad memories, resentment, or other negative emotions.

As you sort, touch every item and ask yourself, “Does this make me feel joy?” If not, consider donating or selling it. If it’s something large, take a picture. You can also scan children’s drawings and keep them in a digital album.

Downsizing can seem like a stressful process, but when you follow these steps, it can go smoothly and cause less emotional strain. If you’re relocating or downsizing, call your local moving company for a moving estimate.

Infographic: Countdown to a successful move

You are moving and you have so much to do with so little time. Don’t panic! The best way to combat the stress of moving is to organize and set deadlines of when to accomplish everything on your to-do list.

Below is a countdown infographic to help achieve a successful move with less stress.

Countdown to a successful move - Bekins

 

For useful moving tips and tricks, please visit Bekins Van Lines website. If you have any questions about your upcoming move, talk to your local Bekins agent.

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Office Moving

Stay Cool During your Summer Move

It’s hot outside and you feel as if you can cut the humid air with a knife and are just dreading the thought of packing and loading all of your stuff. Not only is this uncomfortable, but moving in the heat could be dangerous if you don’t take precautions. Below are some tips to stay safe in the heat during your move.

Stay Hydrated 

Your body will need more water to stay hydrated and keep your core body temperature where it needs to be. Drink 5-7 ounces of fluids every 15 to 20 minutes to replenish the necessary fluids in your body. Beverages with electrolytes will keep yourself energized, waterbut avoid energy drinks.

Also, eat foods that will give your energy while not dehydrating you. Instead of foods with high sodium content (salt) opt for fruits, vegetables, nuts and protein to help get you through the day. Also avoid caffeine and alcohol which can speed up dehydration.

AC on both ends of the move

If possible, don’t turn off your electricity in your new home until the day after you move, and schedule the power to be turned on in your new home a day before you move in. That way, you will be able to use your air conditioning during loading and delivery. If you don’t have air conditioning, consider buying fans to keep you cool keep during your move.

Dress Appropriately

Dress in a light colored t-shirt and in shorts to help keep cool. Lighter clothes will improve your circulation during the move, which helps prevent heat stroke and heat exhaustion. If the temperature is very hot, dampen a towel or cloth in cold water and place it on top of your shoulders. This may sound uncomfortable, but it will help keep your core body temperature down.

Take Breaks

It’s hard to do, especially when moving, but try not to over exert yourself. Rest frequently in a cool spot. Try to move items either early morning or later in the day when it may be cooler.

SunscreenWear sunscreen

Use a sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15. Apply the sunscreen over exposed skin and reapply every two hours, especially if you are sweating profusely. It is also a good idea to wear a hat to protect your scalp from getting burnt.

Hire a professional mover

Sit back and relax in the air conditioning while professional movers do all the work. Professional movers are trained to take care of themselves in extreme temperature. There won’t be any risk of you overheating or even breaking a sweat.

Learn more about Bekins professional moving services.

 

References: Mayo Clinic, News Medical 

 

 

Oregon Coast

This is Moving: Oregon is the Place to Be

What state are American’s moving to the most? No, it’s not Texas, North Carolina or California, but rather Oregon. According to American Moving & Storage (AMSA) 2014 report, 63 percent of inbound shipments were headed to the Beaver State. So, why is everyone moving to Oregon? Here are a few highlights of the state which may be why Oregonians love to live there.

Mountains, Ocean, Forests, Deserts – Oregon has them all!

Mt. Hood (traveloregon.com)

Mt. Hood (traveloregon.com)

Oregon offers plenty of natural beauty ranging from Pacific ocean coastlines to dense forests to the desert on the Eastern part of the state. Oregon even has the “7 wonders of Oregon,” which include the snow capped mountains of Mt. Hood, the 363 miles of coastline that ranges from sandy beaches to rugged cliffs and forestry in between. There is also the Columbia River, Painted Hills, Smith Rock, Wallwas and Crater Lake.

With all the different types of scenery, Oregon has plenty of outdoor recreation, such as white water rafting, mountain biking, hiking and kayaking.  Despite all the outdoor activities, keep in mind it does rain A LOT in Oregon, but when the weather is nice people in Oregon take advantage by spending it outside.

Portland

If you’ve seen the show “Portlandia,” you know Portland is weird – in a good way. The

travelportland.com

travelportland.com

progressive city is considered one of the nicest places to live in the U.S. If you are not into owning a car, Portland is a great city for public transportation options, which include commuter rails, buses, light rail, streetcar lines, and bike and pedestrian paths.

Portland is home to a rising culinary scene thanks to nationally-renowned chefs and the fresh home-grown Oregon food. If you want a quick bite, there are 400 food carts and mobile eateries located throughout the city. Wash your food down with a craft beer from one of the 58+ breweries located in the throughout the city.

Portland isn’t just a great city for humans, but it is also a great place for your dog. Portland has been ranked one of the most dog-friendly cities in the country with 33 dog parks, plenty of dog friendly restaurants and even its own social network for dogs.

No Sales TaxOregon

If you like shopping, the no sales tax in Oregon will come in handy. Oregon is one of five  states in the U.S. that doesn’t have sales tax (Delaware, New Hampshire, Alaska and Montana are the others). However, other taxes, such as property taxes, are higher than other states. Keep this in mind if you are looking to buy a home.

Green is a way of life

Oregonians know what a great place the state is, so they plan on keeping it that way by being one of the greenest states in the United States. Oregon tops lists in recycling, energy-efficiency rates and producing renewable energy. With that said, Oregon has the lowest carbon footprint and Portland is the greenest city in the country.

This Is Moving: America license plate

 

 

 

 

 

 

Moving to Oregon

Do you want to follow the people moving to Oregon? We can help you get there. Bekins Van Lines has nine agents throughout the state.

Cross Town Movers, Inc. (5 locations)
http://www.crosstownmover.net/

455 Turner Rd. SE, Salem OR 97317
Phone: 503-581-6683

1400 Bertelsen Rd. Eugene, OR 97402
Phone: 541-683-5211

502. N. Fir Street, Medford, OR 97501
Phone: 541-779-1036

61395 Ward Rd., Bend, OR 97702
Phone: 541-779-1036

PO Box 637, Corvallis, OR 97339
Phone: 541-752-0646

Flegel Moving & Storage
www.flegelmoving.com
3503 Old Hwy 99 S, Roseburg, OR 97471
Phone: 541-673-4436

ITS Global Relocation Services
www.itsglobalrelo.com

6713 SW Bonita Road Suite 250, Tigard, OR 97224
Phone: 800-800-2321

Southern Oregon Transfer & Storage Co.
1825 NW Washington Blvd., Grants Pass, OR 97526
Phone: 541-476-4439

Do you live in Oregon? Tell us why you moved there and what you love about it by commenting below.

References: http://blog.estately.com/2013/06/37-things-to-consider-before-moving-to-portland/, http://nlcatp.org/7-major-pros-and-cons-of-living-in-oregon/, http://traveloregon.com/7wonders/, http://www.movoto.com/or/moving-to-oregon/, AMSA 2014 Industry Report

Feature Picture: travelportland.com

Attractive young adult couple lying on home floor with coffee cups smiling and looking at blueprints.

Preparing to Move Into your Larger Home

If you’ve spent years in a small apartment or modest home, you already understand the limits of space more than those who live in a larger home.

Of course, some people prefer a small space. But if your family or employment needs change, you may decide to move to a new city and a larger home. Just imagine how much easier your life will be when you actually have room for your current belongings!

However, upsizing holds a few challenges as well as rewards. The more you understand what a larger space means for you, the better you can prepare-not just for moving day, but for all the days afterward.

Downsize Your Belongings a box full of clothes to be donated.

If you want to really enjoy your large new home, cut the clutter before you arrive. Even though everything you currently own will easily fit in your new place, that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t purge some belongings before the movers arrive. There’s no point in paying your movers to box up the books you never read or pack the faded drapes that don’t match your new décor.

Additionally, too much junk is a challenge no matter your home’s size. Even if you have ample room in your new house, you won’t feel much like sorting out the junk once you arrive. Do it now instead.

Prepare Ahead to Save Money in a Larger Space

Although you may be tempted to buy more furnishings right away, resist the temptation to overspend. Unpack a little at a time and see how your current belongings look and feel in your new space.

Also, since you’ve only seen your furnishings in the context of a smaller home, it will take time to adjust to the bare walls and emptier-than-normal rooms. Allow yourself several weeks to simply live with your new environment before you consider adding more furniture or other belongings. Even then, be judicious with new purchases so you stay within your budget.

Depending oMoving Inn your new home’s size, you’ll probably spend more on electricity and gas bills each month. This is another reason to avoid buying new furniture and other accessories right away. When you’re adjusting to a new mortgage payment and higher energy costs, you’ll need to avoid unnecessary purchases for a while.

Adjust Slowly to Your Surroundings

Don’t expect to feel at home right away. It’s normal to feel some anxiety at first.

To combat these unsettled feelings, try to create as much of a normal routine as you can. Take your dogs for a walk to explore the neighborhood. Set up your kitchen in a similar pattern to your old kitchen-at least for a while. Have dinner at the same time as usual.

Remember, too, that you’ve already lived for a long time without those extra closets. There’s no need to fill them just because they exist. As time goes by, you’ll be open to creative ideas for them and other areas in your new home. Besides, not every space must be filled.

If all the open space starts to bother you, just remind yourself about how long it took to pack everything prior to the move. This thought should settle you while you slowly adjust to a bigger home.

If your budget allows for it, make yourself feel more at home by painting the spare bedroom a new color or switching out a bathroom fixture. These smaller, budget-friendly choices help you invest in each new space without automatically filling it with more belongings.

Before long, you’ll enjoy the extra space around you. In the meantime, keep all the best “small home” habits so you feel relaxed, not intimidated, in your larger home.

For more tips about preparing for your move-or adjusting to it after the big day-visit our Bekins blog again soon.

homeforsale

Selling Your Home Before You Move

When you move across the state, or even across the country, you can give your family countless opportunities for growth and exploration. But before you pack up your things and call your local moving company, you need to sell your old home-and fast!

Unfortunately, selling a home takes time. Sometimes houses can stay on the market for months, or even years. If you don’t prepare your home for resale, you may deter future buyers and prolong that time.

So what can you do to speed the process?

Improve the look and feel of your residence with the following suggestions.

Make a Great First ImpressionEntryway

First impressions make or break sales. When people pull up to your driveway, they need to feel welcome and comfortable.

To create a positive experience, inspect your home’s siding. If you notice peeling panels or grungy stains, apply a fresh coat of paint before the showing. Also, a good wash can work wonders for the look of your home. Power wash the exterior to remove stains, dirt, and other buildup.

Trim the Trees

The quality of your surrounding landscape affects the overall appearance of your home. Stray weeds and dead grass will age your home and decrease its value. So trim the hedges and trees, mow the lawn, and add some flowers for warmth and beauty.

Set the Mood with Lighting

Lighting sets a mood and makes the details of your home easier to see. Ensure that each light fixture works well, and put in some new bright bulbs. Also, open curtains and blinds to let in more natural light. A bright home feels more welcoming and open.

kitchen appliances

Photo via http://bit.ly/118yly3

Clean the Kitchen

Many homeowners spend a great deal of time in the kitchen, so they often come to this room first when inspecting your home’s interior. Even if your kitchen isn’t roomy or gadget-filled, you can still impress buyers by keeping it clean and functional.

Replace burners that don’t work, scrub grease and smears off the cabinets, and update any worn appliances.

Follow Your Nose

The smells in a home do much more than influence aesthetic appeal. Odors relate closely to health and sanitation. When your buyers take that first whiff of your home, you want it to smell fresh and clean.

If your home smells musty, air it out for a few hours before your buyers come to view it. Consider burning some scented candles or spraying some air freshener, too.

blog.builddirect.com

blog.builddirect.com

Add a Personal Touch

Your home should put your buyers at ease, and adding your personal touch can do just that. Although you may feel tempted to pack everything away and let your movers handle the storage, place a few strategic pieces of tasteful décor throughout your home to bring out its best features.

Avoid displaying family memorabilia and photos, as these will make it look as though you still plan to live in your current home.

You want your home to look classy but open to future changes in design. And you want to leave enough empty space for your buyers to imagine their own furniture designs and layouts.

Remember a Little Goes a Long Way

Walk through your home as if you were doing so for the first time. Contemplate what features are most desirable for a new home and decide what needs a little loving care. A few repairs and upgrades can transform your home from a fixer-upper to a keeper.

You may need to spend a little extra money to create these finishing touches, but the payoff will be worth it when your buyers eagerly sign those papers for their new home.

DSCF0239

Corporate Relocation Terms You Should Know

Even if you’ve had experience with corporate relocations in the past, you need to brush up on jargon and processes. After all, relocation companies and van lines will use specific terms to describe and prepare you for the move.

Your understanding of these terms can make the relocation process smoother, so take some time to read through the definitions below. You’ll be glad you did so you know exactly what’s going on and what to expect from each stage of the process.

Common Terms Defined

  1. Relocation Package: Materials and information related to the relocation destination. This package provides a basic foundation for your understanding of the new location. Companies may offer specific packages, including the following options:
  • Full pack/unpack
  • Childcare
  • Home finding/buying
  • Elder care
  • Auto transfers
  • Home sale service
  • Lodging
  • Spousal support
  • Storage
  • Temporary housing
  • Expenses
  1. Intrastate and Interstate: The former refers to moves within the same state, but outside the 30-mile local move limit. The latter means the move takes place across state lines.
  2. Cartons: Boxes in various shapes and sizes provided by your chosen moving carrier for the transport of your items.A moving agent greeting a customer.
  3. Moving Coordinator/Consultant: The employee your carrier provides as your single point of contact. From origin to destination, your moving coordinator will contact movers, help you make decisions, and contract any additional services.
  4. Survey: An initial estimate of moving charges conducted by an agent. Usually conducted at the site of origin through visual and inventory checks.
  5. Agent: Carrier employee with authority to act on behalf of the carrier in booking and various other services.
  6. Booking Agent: Carrier employee responsible for accepting and registering your order date and time. Can also double as the origin or destination agent.
  7. Destination Agent: Carrier employee designated to provide assistance and information at your destination.
  8. Origin Agent: Carrier employee designated to assist in readying the shipment and providing information at origin.
  9. Accessorial Charges: Charges such as packing, appliance service, or unpacking in addition to basic freight and transportation costs.
  10. Appliance Service: Preparing large electrical home appliances to ready them for safe shipment.
  11. Moving InShuttle: A smaller truck used to load belongings when a full-sized moving van won’t fit at your origin location. Need for and use of a shuttle usually results in additional costs.
  12. Bill of Lading: Your receipt for services and transport contract. Your signature will acknowledge the release of all goods and items to your carrier at the agreed-upon price.
  13. Valuation Coverage: The liability of household goods carriers operating in interstate commerce (moving from one state to another) is based upon the customer’s declaration of value made prior to the time the shipment is loaded.
  14. Weight Ticket: Statement of van weight while empty and then following shipment loading. This weight ticket helps calculate the total cost of your freight bill.
  15. Storage in Transit (SIT): Temporary storage provided by your carrier warehouse, pending further transport at a later date. If service exceeds 180 calendar days, your shipment falls under the ruling of local warehouse organizers.
  16. Tariff: A publication with carrier rules, rates, regulations, and services available for your move.
  17. Third-Party Service: Any service performed by someone outside your original carrier by your request. Also non-carrier affiliates performing services because of a state, federal, or local law.
  18. Unpacking: An example of additional service you may request. Involves carrier employees removing your items from cartons and placing them on a flat surface while disposing of packing materials. Unpacking services happen upon delivery unless otherwise requested.

Knowledge Is Power

With a basic understanding of the above terms, you can go forward in your move with confidence. Consult your employer and moving company regarding various relocation packages and what perks you can expect.

Potted plants

Moving your Plants to your new Home

If you garden at all-anything from a small succulent in your kitchen window to a full-blown vegetable garden in your backyard you put a lot of time, effort, and care into growing your plants. Because of the hard work you’ve put into them, it may be difficult to leave your plants behind.

Movers typically don’t transport plants because of state regulations and extreme temperature and lack of sunlight in the truck can be fatal. Double check with your local Bekins agents before you pack your plants. After you make sure the place you’re moving to has the right climate and soil for your plants, you can easily pack them up and move them yourself.

Here are a few different common plants and how to best move them.

Perennials/Grasses

First, trim down bigger, sturdier plants to about 6-12 inches. This makes them easier to

gardenguides.com

gardenguides.com

move, it encourages regrowth when you replant them, and it’s actually healthier for the plant. If you leave lots of stems, leaves, or flowers, it can stress out the plant because it’s trying to keep so much more of itself alive.

After trimming down the plants, dig them up-making sure to keep a lot of dirt around the roots-and put them in paper bags.

Make sure you’re using paper bags instead of plastic so the plants can still breathe. If you have to use plastic, poke some holes in it. The plants should be fine for a couple of weeks as long as they don’t get too hot or dry. Just make sure they’re in the shade during the move.

Potted Plants

The first thing to do is to make sure that you’re not moving your potted plants in nice ceramic pots-you don’t want those to break on the road. Move the plants to plastic pots a couple weeks before the move to give them a chance to get used to the new pots. Potted PlantA couple days before the move, water the plants; not too much, not too little. You don’t want them drying out, but you also don’t want them molding.

Next, put the plants in boxes and make sure they’re snug. You can stuff paper or bubble wrap around the pots to make sure they don’t get jostled around. If possible, keep the top of the boxes open to ensure they don’t get crushed by something else.

Also, don’t forget: plenty of your outdoor plants can move to pots. Things like herbs are commonly grown in pots. As long as you give them enough time to readjust to the pots before the move, they should be perfectly fine to travel.

Vegetables

You have two options here, and your choice depends on your space and resources. Your first option is to dig up the entire plant and replant it in a large bucket, such as a five gallon bucket used for food storage. These buckets should sit in your personal vehicle.

Tomato plantThe second option is to cut the plant and put the cutting in a floral tube, making sure it stays moist by covering it with wet paper towels. If you don’t have a floral tube, you can use a potato soaked in water. This method is easier and safer than trying to relocate an entire tomato plant.

When you get to your new home, replant the plants right away. The less time they spend in limbo, the better. Keep in mind that your perennials and vegetables might not look quite as large and beautiful as they did before the move, at least for a while. If they stayed dormant during the move, they can put their energy into root growth once they’re replanted.

If you use these tips to move your plants, next year they should be big and beautiful again-you just have to give them time to recover.

Baby Relocating

Moving with your Infant: 7 Ways to make it Safe & Easy

Have an infant but need to relocate?

Don’t worry. You can achieve a safe and easy move even with your small child in tow. From advanced planning to packing and basic moving tips, the following guide covers everything you need to complete your move with a happy, healthy, and cared-for baby.

Before the Move

Advanced planning is an absolute must when you have an infant. In addition to your regular moving to-dos, add these items to your list:

  1. Create a Meal Plan

Packing boxes and organizing transportation is no easy feat. You might struggle to find time to feed your baby, let alone time to feed yourself. So before your move, take the time to plan a few simple meals to keep up your energy levels. Stick with simple foods you can take on the go, like sandwiches and trail mix.

  1. Book a Babysitter

You and your significant other can take turns packing and watching the baby, but you’ll Moving with a baby 2definitely need help on moving day. You don’t want to worry about your child crawling under foot or crying unnoticed in the corner as you load boxes into the truck.

So hire a professional service, or ask a friend or family member help. Make sure your sitter knows the right date and time, and give plenty of advanced notice. If you worry your go-to sitter might not be available, ask a back-up babysitter to help, just in case.

  1. Find a Pediatrician

Your baby could get sick before, en route, or once you’ve arrived at your new place. To avoid a stressful situation, find a good pediatrician before your move. Ask around, read reviews, and visit your child’s new doctor.

Also, keep copies of your child’s medical records on hand, or mail them in advance to the pediatrician. This way you can keep your child up-to-date on his or her immunizations despite the move.

During the Move

Now that you’ve planned your entire move, it’s time to prepare you and your baby for the official moving day.

  1. Put Together aMoving In Travel Case of Baby Essentials

Think everything you use to care for your baby day and a night. Since moving services may deliver your items before or after you arrive, you’ll want to keep certain essentials with you. This could include:

  • Diapers and wipes
  • Diaper rash ointment
  • Changing pad
  • Changes of clothes
  • Toys and snacks
  • Plenty of baby food
  • First-aid kit
  • Plastic bags for trash
  • Stroller
  • Portable crib
  • One or two blankets
  • Sunscreen

Although packing these items can sometimes seem look more hassle than its worth, you’ll be happy you have them during an emergency.

  1. Take Extra Time En Route

If you are traveling to your new home via road trip or plane, realize that it will take extra time when you have an infant. Plan for frequent stops along the way for feeding, bathroom, or just to take a break.

Bring a noisemaker or recorded sounds that soothe your baby during the trip.

After the Move

Congratulations! You made it through the journey to your new hoSmallerme. But you’re not finished yet.

  1. Enjoy Your First Meal in Your New Home

Upon arrival, plan for an easy takeout meal on the kitchen floor. You can turn this into a fun picnic by spreading a blanket out and taking your meal together with some paper napkins.

  1. Catch Up on Your Sleep

After you’ve eaten and fed your infant, take a few minutes to unpack your basic essentials. This could include a few blankets to sleep on, or finding your toothbrush in your toiletries bag. From there, do what’s necessary to settle in and enjoy your first night in your new home.

If you can, try to remain consistent with your infant’s sleep schedule. Soon you and your family will adjust to your new home and new routine.