Author Archives: Bekins Van Lines

Bekins Van Lines

About Bekins Van Lines

Bekins Van Lines is one of the oldest moving companies in the U.S. Offering both private and corporate relocation services as well as military moves, Bekins truly knows moving.

goodhousekeeping.com

Kitchen Decluttering: How to Spend Less than an Hour Tidying Up

Any family that has recently relocated or moved into a new home, knows the importance of time saving organization and cleaning tips. Dividing your home (and each room) into zones that make it easy to spend less than an hour a day tidying your spaces. Lets start with the busiest room in the house-your kitchen.

Ideally, once you’ve set up your routine, it will take you less and less time each day. However, if you’ve not been as diligent as you need to be in your kitchen, the first time around may take you a little longer. That’s okay. The important thing is just to start.

Preliminaries

Before working in each zone, take heed to a few preliminary tips. According to www.flylady.net, you should carry a timer with you before you start cleaning. Also have on hand three baskets or boxes labeled as “throw away,” “give away,” or “put away.”

The FlyLady also suggests working in clockwise order in any room. This helps you focus on one area at a time.

Here, then, are a few strategies for getting the clutter under control in your kitchen, zone by zone. If it makes sense to re-order your zones according to the clockwise pattern mentioned above, do it.

Zone 1: Cabinets

Set your timer for 15 minutes, and have your boxes nearby. Open each cupboard door one by one. If a family member has put a kitchen or food item in the wrong cupboard, take it out and put it in your “put away” box. Don’t actually put it in the correct location yet! Just stick it in the

goodhousekeeping.com

goodhousekeeping.com

box.

Next, take out any food items that are over six months old (pay attention to expiration dates) and put them in your “throw away” box.

Give your cabinet doors a quick wipe down. Stop when your timer goes off, even if you haven’t finished. You can do the rest of the cabinets another day, starting where you left off. This helps keep you from burning out on your tasks.

Zone 2: Under the Sink

Set the timer for 5 minutes. That should be enough time if you’re doing maintenance; if this is the first attempt, it will take you longer. Just try to work for 5 minutes and see how much you can do.

Throw away old cleansers and rags. If you have few items under the sink, take them out and wipe down or sweep the cupboard floor. Then wipe down both sides of doors with a damp cloth and return all items.

To streamline future organization, look into stacking baskets or adjustable-height shelving-you can get even more organized space this way.

Zone 3: Hanging Storage Areas

Set your timer for 5 minutes and have a wet cloth and duster handy. You’re going to tackle the overhanging pots rack, if you have one, plus any areas where you have dishcloths or towels hanging off the stove or fridge. Quickly scan all the areas where you have hanging items, then you’ll be more efficient.

Remove and quickly wipe down each item to remove dust or grease, then replace. Throw dirty towels or dishrags in your “put away” box; those will go to the laundry room later.

Zone 4: Drawers

Set your timer for 10 minutes. Keep a cordless vacuum and damp cloth/dusting cloth handy as you go along.

Working in a clockwise fashion, wipe down drawer fronts and pulls, then remove items that may be in the wrong location (just as you did for your cupboards). Put these items in the appropriate box and move along quickly. Don’t be tempted to dawdle over a given drawer; just take out what doesn’t belong, throw away trash or junk, and take care of anything you want to donate.

If you see lots of crumbs or dirt, use a small cleaning brush attachment on your small vacuum to get rid of the dirt. If it’s not problematic, though, save the deep cleaning for another day. Just move along quickly.

Zone 5: Work Surfaces & Countertops

Set your timer for 5 minutes (if you get really good at this, it will take you probably 2 minutes). With a damp cloth, quickly wipe down spills, dust, or grease on your counter-tops and back-splash areas. Replace counter-top items as you go rather than taking them off the surface first. This will save time.

If you notice misplaced items as you go, put them in the appropriate box.

Zone 6: Refrigerator & Freezer

Set your timer for 5 minutes. This is not a deep-clean; you’ll have to set aside an additional 30-60 minutes for that task another day. Right now you’re simply getting rid of clutter and doing a quick wipe down.

Begin by throwing out all spoiled food (in both the refrigerator and freezer)-just put it in your regular garbage can or your “throw away” box.

Wipe down top, sides, and doors, then gently wipe the door seals, as they tend to collect dust, crumbs, food spills, and grease over time.  That’s it-you’re done!

goodhousekeeping.com

goodhousekeeping.com

Zone 7: Pantry

If your cupboards basically are your pantry, you can skip this step. If you have a separate pantry, set your timer for 10 minutes.

Follow the suggestions listed for zone 1!

Zone 8: Kitchen Table

You don’t even need to set your timer for this one; just wipe down your table with a damp cloth, removing and replacing items as you go. If you have a wood table, you can use a dusting spray now and then to maintain the wood finish.

Enlist the help of family members to take care of the “put away” box. Once that’s done, congratulate yourself on a job quickly done, then go put your feet up and relax.

Travel background air

Don’t Miss a Detail: Tips for International Relocation

Despite the playful title, where your money goes and what paperwork you need to fill out is the single biggest obstacle to conquer. If you already have a position lined up, you are likely aware of embassy registration in your new country. You likely have a sponsored visa for you and your family members as well. Some less-obvious things to consider are your current debts, mortgages, loans, and credit cards.

Talk to your lenders immediately to determine what you should pay off before you leave, what can be frozen, and what you can continue to pay off while you are in your new country. Are your credit cards valid in your new country? What are the exchange and interest rates?

The other large, potentially challenging obstacles to overcome are health and safety concerns.

Check the Center for Disease Control’s Travelers’ Health Menu for an idea of what immunizations you’ll need and what you could be exposed to in your new country. Binge on doctor visits before you go, getting any surgeries, dental work, or eye wear before you go. While it may add a bit more stress to your relocation-focused mind, it will prevent a medical emergency in a new country.

Another critical question to ask is whether or not your current health insurance will still be available to you. If your new employer offers you insurance or your new, foreign country has socialized medicine, determine the lapse between the end of your current coverage and the beginning of your new coverage.

The U.S. Department of State has a Smart Traveler Enrollment Program, which may be worthwhile for you to explore. It has pertinent information about the risks Americans face when they travel or move to a new country.

Deal with Your Stuff Second: Organizational Tactics and Hard Decisions

Decide what to bring, and then weigh it.

Ask your moving company when your items will arrive in the new city and pack in your luggage all the things you’ll need until the rest of your items arrive. Once you think you have the least items you can survive with, weigh the luggage to see if it’ll pass as a carry-on, checked baggage, or oversized luggage.

Be ruthlessly minimalist about what you want to bring to your new country.

Reassess, and then purge.

Sell extra items on eBay or Craig’s List, or hold a garage sale. Donate whatever else you can’t seem to sell. Set a deadline for your for-sale items, and if they are still at your house, donate them, too.

Take an inventory.

Once you feel good about the items you are going to bring with you, create a list to track them. You might feel like you have it under control, until the day comes when you are looking for your cell phone charger, your child’s favorite stuffed animal, or your comfortable house slippers. Whoops. Avoid this in advance by reviewing your stock and tallying each item.

Organize things into categories.

Separate your family’s items into categories, and then make an inventory list. Pack category items together in order to maintain organization for the unpacking process.

Think About Your Loved Ones: Relocating with Children and Pets

Children often have difficulty adjusting to an international move. Throwing them a goodbye party and encouraging them to stay in contact with friends via social media and email are excellent ways to ease the transition.

Look for schools that offer an International Baccalaureate program because they offer a standardized, transnational curriculum. The options for international schools may be limited in certain countries; if this is the case, a local school might be a better option for your children, especially if you are moving permanently. International Schools Services offers a worldwide list of English-speaking schools.

Now, another big decision-what about your pets?

To bring or not to bring, that is the real question. It’s hard to imagine life without your furry friends, but life for them can be substantially harder in a foreign city.

Look at where you are going to be living. Is there a yard? Is there a dog park nearby? Where can you take your dog for a walk? Will you be working long hours without the ability to come home at lunch? If you think your pet will suffer more with you abroad than it will in a new home, then it is time to think about adoption.

If you choose to bring your pet, every country has pet importation forms and veterinary clearance standards. Your pet likely will need immunizations and a clean bill of health from your vet.

If you do decide to bring your pet, complete the paperwork, certifications, and immunizations, then purchase a hard carrier case and spill-proof water container. Your vet can provide your pet with sedatives.

Taking your pet to a foreign country involves a difficult airplane ride. Ask your airline for information about when you can travel with your pet because there are black-out dates. How much is the surcharge for bringing Fido? Which pet friendly airports can you travel through? Will your pet be stored in-cabin or under-cabin?

On the day of the flight, arrive three hours early for security purposes. Between flights, confirm your pet has been boarded on the next flight during a layover.

Pack your pet’s go-to food brand, and after arriving, compare it to the current country’s food ingredients. Slowly mix in new kibble one quarter at a time until your pet gets used to the new food. Talk to neighbors about places to walk your dog.

These tips will help you ease into your new city. Remember that you don’t need to do this alone. An international professional moving service can circumvent most of the packing, shipping, and unpacking issues involved with international relocation.

DSCF0223

Share the Road Safely with Truck Drivers

The average truck driver (over the road) is expected to cover 125,000 miles a year, which breaks down to 2,500 miles a week and equates to 500 miles a day. That is a lot of time spent on the road.

To help make a truck drivers job easier, follow these guidelines for sharing the road with semi tractor trailers. This benefits not only the truck driver, but your safety as well.

1.    Avoid Blind Spots
Due to the size of the tractor trailer there are four blind spots. They are directly behind the truck, both sides of the truck (a large one beside the truck’s right door and a smaller on the left side) and one directly the front of the truck. A general rule of thumb is to be able to see one of the truck drivers mirrors, if you can see him, then he can see you. Leave space when following a truck and give space when in front of the truck.

Despite how safe trucks and truck drivers are, 1/3 fatal crashes happen between cars and large trucks in their blind spots. Know where the blind spots are and avoid them.

truck-safety-training-1

Photo from drive-safely.net

2.    Pass on the left
Due to the large blind spot on the right side of the truck, the truck driver will not be able to see you when passing on that side, so pass on the left.

3.    Don’t tailgate!
Follow trucks at least four seconds behind to avoid these dangerous scenarios, such as tire blowout, high wind and a truck braking suddenly.

4.    Don’t cut trucks off
Be sure to leave plenty of buffer room when you pull in front of a truck. Semi trucks need 300+ feet when driving at 55 mph to stop vs. a car that needs 140 feet when driving the same speed.

5.    Allow space between the trailer and the curb
Truck drivers sometimes move away from the curb and swing a wide right to turn. This is a blind spot for the driver, so don’t get caught between the truck and the curb.

Photo from driversed.com

Photo from driversed.com

6.    Patience is a Virtue
Due to the weight of the load, a truck might not be going the speed that you may want it, so be patient. Avoid making erratic moves. When a truck is passing another one the highway, wait for the truck to get back into the right lane. Never try to go around a truck that is backing up.

7.  Lower Your Brights
Your bright headlight setting causes reflections off of the large side mirrors of trucks that can blind the driver. Dim your lights when coming within one block of an oncoming vehicle.

8. Signal sooner
Because of the amount of stoppage time a truck needs, it is best to signal early when changing lanes, stopping or turning. Generally try to signal at least three seconds before making your move.

9. Merge with Care
Avoid merging in front of a truck when traffic ahead may be coming to stop or slowing down.

10. Pay attention and Avoid Distractions
You should be doing this anyway! Distracted drivers are dangerous. Distracted has caused 9/10 fatal crashes and 2/10 with injuries.
cellphone

ILovemyDriverSign_Bekins

Help us Celebrate National Truck Driver Appreciation Week!

It’s National Truck Driver Appreciation Week (Sept. 14-20) and here at Bekins Van Lines, we are taking the time to show our appreciation to the people that are dedicated to delivering successful household moves.

As part of showing our appreciation, we would like you to participate! It’s easy and you could win $100 in the process! Follow the instructions below:

1) Print the attached signs on this email and choose one of the two, if choosing the second, write your driver’s name on the line.

2) Take a picture of you holding the sign.

3) Post the picture on our Facebook, Twitter or Google+ pages using the hashtags “#driveBekinsloyalty” and “#NTDAW” – You may also email your photos to bekinsmarketing@wvlcorp.com.

4) You will be automatically entered to win a $100 Visa gift card upon posting or email of your photo.

Join us between now and Sept. 27 (when the contest ends) in thanking all our professional male and female drivers for making your move successful and keeping our highways safe.

ILovemyDriverSign_Bekins DrivesMyLoyalty_Bekins

business handshake

Benefits for Corporate Clients When Using Bekins

For more than 120 years in the household goods moving industry, Bekins Van Lines, Inc., has specialized in corporate relocation for transferees and their families.

Making a smooth transition for your employees is a priority. With its network of 370 agents and 5000 drivers, Bekins can ensure that your employees will be well taken care of.

As a Human Resources Director and Corporate Relocation Manager, you are looking for quality and profitability. Bekins offers this through our unique business model as well as the services that put us above the competitors.

  •  First-Class service for your employees – When a National Account client has an employee that requires relocation services, clients can be assured that their moving experience will be handled by qualified and trained professionals. The transferee will be serviced by one of the finest and most trusted firms in the moving industry.
  • Priority Service – National Account relocations receive priority over individually booked moves. National Account Transportation Agreements are not affected by seasonal deviations, such as rate adjustments.
  • Fixed Rates – Moving rates and discounts are fixed during the term of the agreement. During our busiest season of May through the end of September, peak charges are waived. This will provide savings to National Account clients that can equate to hundreds of dollars.
  • Free Replacement Value Protection “Valuation” – Under a Bekins National Account, your employees will receive full value protection valuation up to $100,000 at no charge. Another significant amount of savings, $300 – $800 depending on the characteristics of the move.
  • Custom Tailored Moves – We are focused on listening to the requests and needs of the transferee and fulfilling them with an honest, accurate and detailed moving plan. From partial packing to full pack, to delivery of cars separate from the household goods, to moving of pets, we will create the estimate tailored to your employee’s requirements.
  • Communication – Sharing of information is critical to providing a positive moving experience. Our move coordinators will be in touch with you and the transferee on a regular basis.
  • Higher Level of Work Production – Bekins will step up and handle all of the components of the move. Our move management staff is focused on alleviating stress and taking the time to coordinate all aspects of the move so your employee won’t have to worry about the moving process. We’ll set up appointments, communicate with the transferee from the time of estimate all the way to when the truck leaves destination.
  • Reduced Work for You – You will save time and focus on your day-to-day activities. Simply send us the name of the transferee and we will promptly start the relocation process.
  • Direct Billing – We will invoice the company directly with a comprehensive breakdown of all costs.
  • Accurate Invoices – We will perform a complete audit of the relocation charges. When you receive a Bekins invoice, you will know that it is accurate.
  • Unique Web site – Start the relocation off right. We will create a Web site that can be used for your transferees to insert their moving information and send it to the correct moving consultant.

To find out more information about a National Account Transportation Agreement with Bekins, contact Doug DeLor at 1-317-558-0733 or doug_delor@wvlcorp.com.

Congratulations Kellee!

Kellee Johnson Earns Bekins Van Lines Employee of the Year

With each move, there is a whole team behind dedicated to making sure it goes smooth as possible. Each quarter, Bekins Van Lines recognizes four individuals that have been exceptional employees that have shown their dedication and hard work.

Bekins Van Lines CEO Mark Kirschner announced Kellee Johnson as the Employee of the Year at a staff meeting on Sept. 9.

“I was completely shocked when they said my name because there was some pretty stiff competition,” Johnson said.

Johnson joined Bekins in 2008. She is known as a dedicated, loyal worker throughout her department in accounting and revenue. Johnson consistently exceeded the production level established for her position as an audit analyst. She earned the Employee of the Quarter for Q2 (October – December) because of her excellent work ethic.

Below are photos from the announcement earlier today. There are also videos from the meeting on the Bekins Van Lines You Tube Channel

Congratulations, Kellee and thank you for your hard work through the years for a well-deserved honor of Employee of the Year!

 

customer-service-billboard

This is Moving – Terminology

The moving world has its own lingo and when preparing for a move it is important to understand the terminology.  Below are common words that you may come across in the moving process:

Accessorial (additional) services – Services, such as packing, appliance servicing, unpacking or stair carries, that you request to be performed (or are necessary because of landlord requirements or other special circumstances). Charges for these services are in addition to the transportation charges. Learn more about Bekins Additional Service.

Advanced charges – Charges for services performed by someone other than the movers. A professional, craftsman or other third party may perform these services at your request. The mover pays for these services and adds the charges to your Bill of Lading charges.

Agent – A local moving company authorized to act on behalf of a national van line. The agent may handle the booking, origin, hauling and/or destination services. Find your Local Agent

Agreed delivery date – The agreed delivery date can range from one day to several depending on the weight of your shipment. Your salesperson will discuss the transit times with you prior to registering your shipment with Bekins Traffic Department.

Agreed pick-up date – The agreed pick-up date can range from one day to several depending on the weight of your shipment. Your salesperson will discuss the transit times with you prior to registering your shipment with Bekins Traffic Department.

American Moving & Storage Association (AMSA) – The trade organization for the moving industry.amsa-logo

Appliance Service by Third Party – The preparation of major electrical appliances to make them safe for shipment. Charges for these services may be in addition to the line-haul charges.

Auto inventory – A form used when relocating an automobile, motorcycle or boat that lists the vehicle’s miles and condition at both origin and destination. Can also be referred to as motor vehicle inventory.

Auxiliary service or Shuttle Service – Use of a smaller vehicle to provide service when the residence is not accessible to the mover’s normal equipment. Shuttle service involves offloading the goods from the original equipment and reloading to a smaller vehicle. Depending on the weight of the shipment, this could involve several trips with the smaller vehicle. The shuttle charge is based on a rate-per-hundred weight.

DSCF0237Bill of Lading – The receipt for your goods and the contract for their transportation. It is your responsibility to understand the Bill of Lading before you sign it. If you do not agree with something on the Bill of Lading, do not sign it until you are satisfied that it is correct. The Bill of Lading is an important document. Don’t lose or misplace your copy.
Bingo sheet – A form that allows a van operator or customer to easily check off items as they are delivered. Also called a check-off sheet.

Booking agent – The agent who prepares the estimate of cost from the information obtained during a visual survey. The booking agent does not necessarily have to be located at or near the origin. When the booking agent is located at the origin, they will also be the origin agent and perform the visual survey.

Bulky article – To ensure safe transportation, some articles included in a shipment (e.g. big screen television, motorcycles, hot tubs, etc.) require extra handling and/or blocking. There is an extra charge for such items.

Carrier – The moving company holding the operating authority required to transport household goods.

Cash on Delivery (COD) – Transportation for an individual shipper for which payment is required at the time of delivery at the destination residence (or warehouse).

Certified scale – Any scale designed for weighing motor vehicles, including trailers or semitrailers not attached to a tractor, and certified by an authorized scale inspector and licensing authority. A certified scale may also be a platform or warehouse type scale that is properly inspected and certified.

Commercial shipper – Any person who is named as the consignor or consignee in a Bill of Lading contract who is not the owner of the goods being transported but who assumes the responsibility for payment of the transportation and other tariff charges for the account of the beneficial owner of the goods. The beneficial owner of the goods is normally an employee of the consignor and/or consignee.

Consignor – The person at origin who arranges for the transportation of the shipment.

Crating – Refers to the process of building a custom wood crate for the purpose of protecting certain items during transport.

Cube – A measurement of the capacity or cubic space of a truck or container. The industry average of is seven pounds per cubic foot.

Cube sheet – A document used to determine the cubic feet that furniture, appliances, cartons and miscellaneous articles occupy in the van. By converting the cubic feet into pounds, an estimated weight is acquired that is used in calculating the estimated cost for a move. Also referred to as a Table of Measurements.Bekins Table of Measurements (Cube Sheet)

 

CWT – An abbreviation for “per 100 pounds of specified weight.” Per-hundred weight.

Department of Transportation (DOT) – The federal agency which governs the interstate transportation industry, including movers of household goods.

Destination agent – Affiliated agent in the city to which the customer is moving. They are required to furnish storage at destination, unpacking and arranges for appliance service, if requested.

Disassembled by owner (DBO) – Items are disassembled by owner rather than by the moving company. Bekins is not responsible for the reassembly of these items.

Dispatcher – Assumes the task of communicating the route of a shipment to van operators and agents, making sure that instructions are carried out accordingly.

Estimate: Binding – This is a written agreement made in advance with the moving company. It guarantees the total cost of the move based upon the quantities and services shown on the estimate. Learn more about estimates.

Estimate: Non-Binding – This is an approximation of the cost by the moving company, based on the estimated weight of the shipment and the accessorial services requested. A non-binding estimate is not binding on the mover. The final charges will be based upon the actual weight of your shipment, the services provided and the tariff provisions in effect. Learn more about estimates.

Estimated Weight – An approximate weight of a shipment determined by multiplying the estimated cubes by seven pounds.

Expedited Service – An agreement with the mover to perform transportation by a set date in exchange for charges based on a higher minimum weight.

Extra delivery – A portion of a shipment unloaded at a location other than the destination address indicated on the Bill of Lading. Also referred to as an extra stop.

Extra pick up – A portion of a shipment loaded at a location other than the origin address indicated on the Bill of Lading. Also referred to as an extra stop.

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) – Established within the Department of Transportation to regulate the safe operation requirements for commercial vehicle drivers, carriers, vehicles and vehicle equipment.

Flight charge – An extra charge for carrying items up or down flights of stairs.

Fuel surcharge – The moving company’s tariff provides for a percentage adjustment to the transportation charge (and SIT Pickup and Delivery) to aid in recovery of the increased cost of fuel. The surcharge, which can change twice monthly, is based upon the national average cost of diesel, as reported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

Gross weight – The weight of the truck after a shipment has been loaded. Also referred to as the heavy weight.

Hauling agent – The agent who owns the van assigned by the van line to transport your household goods from origin to destination.

Helper – A peDSCF3289rson hired by the van operator or agent to assist in the loading and unloading of goods. Bekins requires all helper labor be certified.

High value article – Items included in a shipment that are valued at more than $100 per pound. These items should be disclosed with the mover to ensure they are protected accordingly. Also referred to as items of extraordinary value.

Household goods (HHG) – Personal goods or property used in a home.

Household goods descriptive inventory – The detailed descriptive list of your household goods showing the number and condition of each item. Also referred to as an inventory.

Individual shipper – The individual requesting movement of a shipment and paying the transportation charges.

Interstate move – The relocation of goods in the United States from a place in one state to a place in a different state.

Intrastate move – The relocation of goods within one state that never crosses state lines or includes a segment outside of that same state. Intrastate moves are NOT regulated by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration.

Inventory – The detailed descriptive list of your household goods showing the number and condition of each item. Also referred to as a household goods descriptive inventory.

Items of extraordinary value – Items included in a shipment that are valued at more than $100 per pound. These items should be disclosed with the mover to ensure they are protected accordingly. Also referred to as high value article. Learn more about replacement value protection.

Leave over – When articles to be shipped are left behind due to insufficient space on the primary van. An additional van(s) is then utilized for transportation and delivery. Also referred to as an overflow.

Light weight – The weight of a truck before a shipment is loaded, including all essential loading equipment and packing materials. Also referred to as the tare weight.

Line haul – The charges for the vehicle transportation portion of your relocation. These charges apply in addition to the accessorial service charges.

Load spread – Agreed pick-up dates.

Local move – A move within a particular geographical area like a town or district instead of a state or country. Learn more about local moves.

Long carry – An added charge for carrying articles excessive distances between the mover’s vehicle and the residence. Charges for these services may be in addition to the line-haul charges.

Motor vehicle inventory – A form used when transporting an automobile, motorcycle or boat that lists the vehicle’s miles and condition at both origin and destination. Also referred to as auto inventory.

Net weight – The actual weight of a shipment obtained by subtracting the tare weight from the gross weight.

Operating authority – The government permit that defines the scope of a carrier’s operation by area and commodity.

Order for Service – The document authorizing the mover to transport your household goods.

Order (Bill of Lading) number – The number used to identify and track your shipment. The number appears on all documentation and correspondence. Also referred to as the Registration Number.

Origin agent – The agent responsible for performing packing and preparing necessary documentation for the move. Click here to find your local agent.

Overflow – When articles to be shipped are left behind due to insufficient space on the primary van. An additional van(s) is then utilized for transportation and delivery. Also referred to as a leave over.

Packed by owner (PBO) – Used on the inventory to identify cartons that have been packed by the customer. Learn more about packing.

Packing date – A date set aside for packing. It is usually one day prior to loading of the goods.
Permanent storage – The warehousing of a shipment for an unspecified duration.

Pickup and delivery charges – Separate transportation charges applicable for transporting your shipment between the storage-in-transit warehouse and your residence.

Planner – Assumes the task of assigning a hauling agent to load, transport, and unload shipments as they are registered in Bekins Traffic Department.

promover_colorProMover Program – A certification program created by the American Moving & Storage Association (AMSA). The program gives consumers an easy way to separate reputable, professional movers from rogue movers. ProMovers must meet stringent requirements and agree to comply with the regulations set forth by AMSA as well as the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) and the Surface Transportation Board (STB). Bekins and all its agents are certified ProMovers.

Purchase order – A written authorization for billing a relocation to a company. It is sometimes used in place of the Order for Service.

Reweigh – When there is doubt about the origin weight of a shipment, a reweigh may be requested by the customer at destination. There is no charge for the reweigh; however, charges are calculated on the new weight.

Scale ticket – A voucher providing the weigh scale reading for tare weight and/or gross weight of a van.

Shuttle service – Use of a smaller vehicle to provide service when the residence is not accessible to the mover’s normal equipment. Shuttle service involves offloading the goods from the original equipment and reloading to a smaller vehicle. Depending on the weight of the shipment, this could involve several trips with the smaller vehicle. The shuttle charge is based on a rate-per-hundred weight. Also referred to as auxiliary service.

Spread dates – The combined dates for the agreed pick up and the agreed delivery.

Storage-in-transit (SIT) – Temporary warehouse storage of your shipment pending further transportation. For example, if your new home isn’t quite ready to occupy. You must specifically request SIT service, which may not exceed a total of 90 days of storage, and you will be responsible for the added charges for SIT service as well as the warehouse handling and final delivery charges.

Stretch wrap – The material and process used to protect overstuffed furniture (except leather and suede) from damage. Also referred to as shrink wrap.

Surface Transportation Board (STB) – The agency within the Department of Transportation responsible for the regulation and monitoring of railroads and rates for the household goods industry.

Table of Measurements – A document used to determine the cubic feet that furniture, appliances, cartons and miscellaneous articles occupy in the van. By converting the cubic feet into pounds, an estimated weight is acquired that is used in calculating the estimated cost for a move. Also referred to as a Cube Sheet.

Tare weight – The weight of a truck before a shipment is loaded, including all essential loading equipment and packing materials. Also referred to as the light weight.

Tariff – The mover’s required, published price, list of rules, regulations, rates and charges for the performance of interstate moving services.

Transit time – The time from when your belongings are picked up to when they are delivered to the designated destination.

Transportation charge – The cost of a single loading, transporting and unloading of goods comprise the charge.

Uncrating – Refers to the process of removing the wooden crating material from items that had been crated.

Unpacking – Services required to remove or undo packing of goods at the end of a shipment’s transportation. Learn more about Bekins unpacking services.

Valuation – The degree of “worth” of the shipment. The valuation charge compensates the mover for assuming a greater degree of liability than that provided for in the base transportation charges. Learn about Bekins valuation options.

Van line – A motor carrier with local agents that coordinates the movement of household goods and special products.

Van operator – The individual who oversees the loading, hauling and unloading of your household goods.

Visual survey – A visual survey is performed by the origin agent to determine which items are to be moved. The amount of packing required and any special services necessary to properly service your shipment are determined during the survey. A cube sheet is prepared and used to determine the weight. The weight is the basis for the moving cost. All elements of the survey come together to determine an estimated cost for moving your goods.

Your Rights and Responsibilities When You Move – A government-required publication given to all COD customers. Learn more about Your Rights and Responsibilities When You Move.

IMG_8188

The Importance of the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge

Bekins Van Lines corporate office accepted the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge yesterday, Aug. 20 to raise awareness for ALS as well as donate to ALS Association.

Bekins challenged all of its agents to do the same. Before dumping ice water on yourself, here are some things you should know about ALS from alsa.org.

  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), often referred to as “Lou Gehrig’s Disease,” is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. Motor neurons reach from the brain to the spinal cord and from the spinal cord to the muscles throughout the body. The progressive degeneration of the motor neurons in ALS eventually leads to their death. When the motor neurons die, the ability of the brain to initiate and control muscle movement is lost. With voluntary muscle action progressively affected, patients in the later stages of the disease may become totally paralyzed.
  • ALS is not contagious.
  • It is estimated that ALS is responsible for nearly two deaths per hundred thousand population annually.
  • Approximately 5,600 people in the U.S. are diagnosed with ALS each year. The incidence of ALS is two per 100,000 people, and it is estimated that as many as 30,000 Americans may have the disease at any given time.
  • Although the life expectancy of an ALS patient averages about two to five years from the time of diagnosis, this disease is variable and many people live with quality for five years and more.  More than half of all patients live more than three years after diagnosis.
  • About twenty percent of people with ALS live five years or more and up to ten percent will survive more than ten years and five percent will live 20 years. There are people in whom ALS has stopped progressing and a small number of people in whom the symptoms of ALS reversed.
  • ALS occurs throughout the world with no racial, ethnic or socioeconomic boundaries.
  • ALS can strike anyone.
  • The onset of ALS is insidious with muscle weakness or stiffness as early symptoms. Progression of weakness, wasting and paralysis of the muscles of the limbs and trunk as well as those that control vital functions such as speech, swallowing and later breathing generally follows.
  • There can be significant costs for medical care, equipment and home health care giving later in the disease.  It is important to be knowledgeable about your health plan coverage and other programs for which your may be eligible, including SSA, Medicare, Medical and Veteran Affairs benefits.
  • ALS Association has raised 41.8 million from the Ice Bucket Challenge Donations. Donations can be made here.

Below are the videos and photos from yesterday’s challenge!

Watch the video here on our new YouTube Channel.

 

 

 

Bekins storage in Hollywood

Throwback Thursday: Bekins in Southern California

Since 1891, Bekins Van Lines has been a leader of innovation in the household-goods moving industry. Throughout Bekins rich history, the specialization in storage became a primary service, especially in Los Angeles and its surrounding areas. For a special throwback Thursday, here is an article from the LA Times in 1989. Looking back how Bekins changed the storage business as well as the South California landscape.

Bekins: A Storehouse of History
LA Times
March 01, 1989
Leon Whiteson

They rise like medieval castle keeps above busy Southern California intersections. Their steep blank sides, relieved by rows of small windows, give no clue to the activities behind their fortress-like walls. Only the skyline signs reading Bekins Storage reveal the mundane purpose of these muscular architectural landmarks.

The era of the grand Bekins castles is past, along with the grandeur of the service that moved America when the entire country seemed to be shifting West. But as the company’s late president intended, Bekins’ powerful buildings stand as permanent landmarks on our changing urban landscape.

According to contemporaries, Milo Bekins believed that “moving is the American way.” He also believed that customers entrusting their personal possessions to Bekins needed the sense of reassurance offered by solidly built warehouses located on prominent sites. In a young and rapidly expanding city such as Los Angeles, where so many buildings seemed flimsy and transitory, he decided that his structures for temporary storage would appear unshakably permanent.

Bekins built its first reinforced concrete warehouses in the 1920s and ’30s. A prime example of its architectural style is the 55-year-old building at 929 S. Brand Blvd. in Glendale, a solid oblong box that towers seven stories high.

Bekins Santa MonicaAt street level, the arches of a recessed arcade mark a regular rhythm between the slender vertical columns that rise to the roof and end in finials resembling little dunce caps. Between the main columns are small pilasters that form frilly edges to the concrete cliff at top and bottom. Tiny windows make the building appear even bulkier, increasing its presence on the street.

Yet another landmark warehouse, an eight-story castle built in 1929, is located at the corner of Pico and Crenshaw boulevards. A ground-floor arcade houses a row of shops, including Bekins’ furniture sales division, and arches are two stories high, allowing light to filter into second-floor offices.

In its heyday the Bekins Co. owned more than 100 storage buildings in 14 states. In an attempt to streamline its operations in the face of stiff competition, Bekins began selling off its real estate in the early 1980s. By 1983, when purchased by Minstar Inc. of Minneapolis, Minn., Bekins’ stock of warehouses had been reduced to 55.

Founded in 1891

Bekins Van Lines was founded in 1891 in Sioux City, Iowa, by two young Dutch immigrant brothers, Martin and John Bekins. Martin moved west four years later, first to Omaha, Neb., and then Los Angeles. In 1895 the brothers organized the first transcontinental move from Sioux City to Los Angeles, and opened an office here in an old van at the corner of 2nd and Main streets.

bekins-storageOne year later, Martin Bekins owned six horse-drawn vans and a one-story brick storage building at 360 S. Alameda St. A five-story reinforced concrete building was later built on the site and still stands alongside the original warehouse.

The Bekinses were innovators in the moving and storage business. The first company in the West to specialize in household goods, Bekins later pioneered the concept of containerized storage. In 1903, Martin Bekins introduced the “side-winder” gasoline-powered moving truck to Los Angeles.

Martin’s son, Milo, took over as Bekins chairman in 1927, and built the company into the largest operation of its kind in the world. In the 1950s, 1,000 Bekins vans rolled across the country, serving a restless post-World War II population moving from the cities to the suburbs, and from one suburb to another.

A Simple Formula

The pre-World War II Bekins buildings were designed by structural engineers rather than architects. The vaguely Italianate style of decoration, featuring mini-pilasters and curly roof lines, was culled from the contemporary architectural pattern books popular among designers at the time. An example of the style can be seen at the 511 S. Fair Oaks Ave. warehouse in Pasadena.

Bekins buildings had a simple structural and design formula. Columns were spaced in 26-foot bays under 12-foot ceilings. At the rear were one or two high doors for loading and unloading goods. Ground floor frontages were glassed-in for small shops or offices. Big metal signs displaying the company name dominated the skyline.

LABekinsSMBThe warehouses have stored an extraordinary range of personal items over the decades, from cases of monocles to the Pentagon Papers. The latter, a top-secret study of U.S. military involvement in Indochina, was stored in the Bekins Beverly Hills warehouse at 215 S. Canon Drive, in “several metal handcases, a footlocker, 18 book volumes, a large cardboard carton and a large carton file,” according to an affidavit filed by the U.S. Department of Justice.

In the 1940s and ’50s, the style of the Bekins buildings changed. In keeping with the undecorated modernist fashion then coming into vogue, the warehouses became plainer and squatter.

Typically Featureless

The 1943 four-story concrete warehouse at 35 W. Huntington Drive in Arcadia, a similar design at 2101 E. Carson Street in Long Beach, and the 1953 five-story building at 1425 Holt Blvd. in Pomona are examples of the slab-sided, featureless and almost windowless blocks typical of this period.

The company also bought warehouses built by other storage companies. The 11-story Hollywood Storage Co. building at 1025 N. Highland Ave. was the tallest structure in Hollywood when erected in 1925. It was purchased by Bekins in 1939. And in 1943, a nine-story structure at 3625 S. Grand Ave., built in 1924 by the Birch-Smith Storage Co., was added to Bekins real estate inventory.

The original article can be found here: http://articles.latimes.com/1989-03-01/news/vw-725_1_bekins-vans

Inside of a classroom with back to school on the chalkboard

Save on Back to School Shopping

With another busy moving season wrapping up, it is about time to get your kids ready for school and with that comes back to school shopping. According to the National Retail Federation, the average family is expected to spend $606 per child for back to school shopping. If you have more than one child, the dollars add up fast. Here are a few ways to save this year:

Take inventory – Take inventory of what your child already has for clothes and shoes in order to avoid burning money on items that are already in the closet. Take the opportunity to teach your child a lesson in charity and donate any outgrown clothes or shoes. Articles of clothing that are beyond repair can be torn up and used as rags for cleaning.

Also, take inventory of office supplies sitting around the house. You may find some notebooks, folders, pens and pencils that can be of used for the upcoming school year.

Create a shopping list with your child and stick with it – After taking inventory you will have a pretty good idea about what items are needed for the year ahead. If you have just moved, be sure to consider what might be needed with the weather at your new home. Sit down with your child and discuss what supplies they think they will need. Stick to the list and avoid falling for the deals that aren’t needed.  Just because an item is “on sale” doesn’t mean you’re saving money by buying it. If you don’t need it, don’t buy it.

Take advantage of sales tax holidays – This is a great way to save if your state offers it. There are different requirements for each state, so do your research and double check what is being offered.

Plan lunch – If your child does not eat school lunch, you will most likely be the one to prepare it. The best way to do this is plan lunches for a week out by making a grocery list and sticking with it. Check for weekly deals on meat products and other items used for lunch. Consider going to big box stores to stock up on items that are non-perishable.

Get next year’s supplies this fall – The best and cheapest time to get school supplies is after school has already started. Stock up on supplies for the following school year or for next semester.

Back-to school swap – Coordinate with mothers of children the same gender as yours but different ages to host an annual clothes swap.  This is a great way to meet families in the area after moving, while saving money, too!

Track the sales and shop online – The easiest and most time-effective way to compare sales is online. It’s also easier to find coupons online and use them on the spot when purchasing items. By shopping online, you are also saving on gas and lunch that usually goes into a day of shopping.

Use apps to get some couponsShop Kick, Retail Me Not and Target’s Cartwheel offer coupons based on your location. With Target’s app, you can scan items and it will bring up their available coupons.

Happy shopping!